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Found 18 results

  1. The Black Hills Institute sells a number of replica of their Stan T rex specimen to museums and here are some images of one being put together. Dialogue mostly by Pete Larsen. This specimen will be hung and going into a very confined space. No idea who is their client. STAN is the largest, most complete, Tyrannosaurus rex, of the male (or gracile) morphotype, ever found. Finished mounting the skull, Stan T.rex skeleton. It is, indeed, the nicest T.rex skull. Finished the ribs, scapula, arms, and gastralia. If you were swallowed by a T.rex, and made it nearly to the end of the alimentary canal, and had x-ray vision, this is the the view you would see just before becoming a coprolite One of the common mistakes made by those of us who mount theropod dinosaur skeletons is to mount the scapula-coracoids as if they were the scapulae of mammals. This is the correct configuration. Not only do articulated specimens verify this hypothesis, but (in non avian theropods) the furcula must articulate with the scapulae. mounting the pelvis Here’s how you fit a 20+ foot long tail in a 10 foot space! Had to beef up the front post in the sacrum-ilia steel support, which will hold more than 60% of the total weight. Here you can see the supporting steel before we closed the mold and poured the polyurethane foaming resin. This cast skeleton will be hung, so we needed to add a skyhook between Dorsal 1 and Cervical 10 Ilia and Dorsals Here is the left side of Stan’s pelvis and left leg, laid out in preparation for mounting. This skeleton is going into a very tight spot that takes a lot of engineering to make everything fit and still provide a pleasing and anatomically correct pose.
  2. Velociraptor skull

    I hope this is the correct section because i didnt make this, i simply bought it online in a fossil bundle. I was wondering what members think of this model.
  3. Hi there, I am looking for accurate replicas of actual dinosaur fossils: claws, teeth, skulls, skeletons, etc. I have seen several different resin replicas floating around eBay and Amazon, etc. but I am not looking for toys or other enhanced replicas or cheap models. I am looking for actual casts of real specimens, something worthy of a museum (maybe not museum price though?). I am especially interested in claws and skulls, both for reference material and display. Something durable too, so no ceramic, glass, etc. Does anyone know of a reputable site for this? Also, if you have any cool replicas, I would love to see them. Post pictures of them here! @Troodon
  4. First up, the seller of this egg stated upfront this is a replica, so this isn't a scam warning. Here, we have an oviraptor egg that could fool even experienced collectors. It looks realistic because it's made out of real oviraptor eggshells. It's even covered with a coating of matrix. This is common practice; I've seen hadrosaur eggs are faked this way, with plaster mixed in to make the egg seem round and heavy. For reference, here's a real Oviraptor (Elongatoolithus sp.) that's been professionally prepped. Oviraptor eggs are commonly faked, so four ways to get a real one is: 1) Get a prepped one, preferably with matrix removed. The eggshell should be black 2) Avoid eggs that are perfect. Real eggs have cracks, and sometimes missing entire chunks of shells. 3) Get one without a matrix base. This isn't a sure-fire method, but I've noticed many fake oviraptor eggs have matrix bases, whereas I can't say the same of those free of matrix. Perhaps the fake eggs require a matrix base for support during their construction process. 4) Price. Again, this is arguable, but the real Oviraptor eggs I've seen often comes with price tag several times that of dubious ones. Having sent some eggs for prepping in the past, this is justified because the cost and time of prepping may cost more than the actual egg. Some scammers like to lure people in with bargain prices. Chinese eggs flood the market, and for many collectors, a dinosaur egg is a must-have. There are more fakes than there are real ones, so take extra care if you seek to buy one. As always, if you're unsure, post pictures here and we will try to help.
  5. Hey guys I remember the ROM has on display a slab cast of Mistaken Point, Newfoundland fossils on the Dawn of Life Preview Gallery. Being an admirer of Mistaken Point is there a place where we could perhaps get these replicas? Or are collectors allowed to go to Mistaken Point and take casts of the fossils there for keepsakes? I understand no one is allowed to take fossils there due to government laws so I am hoping that casts are an excellent alternative for amateur collectors.
  6. My first cast and paint EVER!

    Last Saturday I decided to try something new. I had made a couple of plaster casts in the past, but NEVER painted any before. I don't like painting the walls in my house so never though I would enjoy painting a replica but by golly it was a BLAST! To start with the casting I made 5 teeth, and 3 broke, but 2 came out somewhat decent. I decided to paint my 3 broken ones first just to try it. The fourth tooth in the pictures is a REAL fossil rom Hell Creek, not a cast! I did not have it with me while I was painting so I was just trying to go off of memory. I used a matte sealer for the root, and a high gloss sealer for the crown. They both have a shine to them though! Tell me what you guys and gals think! I promise I won't be offended, in fact if you can offend me you have done something no one has done before! Hmm which one is real? Nope not this one. It could use a little more blending at the crown and root I think. The mold I used seems a bit fabricated from the real deal, but it looks nice! I think the white I added on the tips bothers me the most, but I was trying to give it that shine. Lets see what the real deal looks like. Not the greatest trike tooth out there, but its nice! No idea what is going on with this side of it. A little enamel peel, but it is to be expected. I thought I remembered the crown being darker? Eh, its still a cool piece!
  7. Tully Monster Replica

    This my latest attempt at the newest version of a Tully. Cast in urethane plastic and airbrushed in acrylic paint.
  8. I am taking a risk that some unprincipled Forum member will try and snatch this purchase from me. However, I thought the educational benefit of my evaluation system would outweigh that possibility. This beauty is currently available for sale via an Internet auction site. It is labeled as a "Rare Synanceia verrucosa (sic) Stone Fossil Fish Skeleton" Here are the reasons I am poised to spring for the $49.95 (free shipping) price. It's RARE. The seller says so right there in the offer. That makes the price a bargain. I know it's really rare, 'cause I've never seen anything like it. The seller provides the SCIENTIFIC NAME. That alone proves that the seller is a well informed individual, probably a scientist themselves. The seller has a 99.6% positive rating!!! The geological age is given as "unknown." This is additional proof of the items authenticity. A fraudulent seller would simply provide a fiction for age. Look at the robust preservation of the bone! Even from a photo one can see it's exquisitely preserved. No cracks or breaks are visible. Obviously there is no repair. The prep looks wonderful. The bone has been expertly freed from the surrounding matrix with no obscuring matrix left in place. You will note that the bone is preserved in 3D proving that this is no "painted on" forgery. I could go on and on with my scientific evaluative techniques. However, this should be sufficiently instructive to inform Forum members of some simple reasoning tools to assure avoidance of acquiring spurious fossil material. No need to thank me, gotta run and get that bid in.....
  9. I'm pretty new to fossil collecting, however I'd like to dive right in. I've been looking at the FossilShack, however I was wondering if there are any other reputable dealers within the US? I've heard eBay is a great place, but I don't know which dealers to avoid, does anyone know of any? I'm also interested in buying an authentic looking replica for a friends birthday. I don't want to pay a fortune (college student), but I'm mainly looking complete skulls and claws. Thanks!
  10. Pterodactylus kochi

    Hello, Here some photos from my last works, Pterodactylus kochi. The scale is always 1/1 and I used a real replica 1/1 size for the good dimensions . It's a common one you can find easily on the web : Another one flying: Cheers!
  11. Mounting a Psittacosaurus Replica

    I recently bought a Do It Yourself Psittacosaurus skeleton cast. And I thought it would be fun to share the process of mounting the skeleton. I already had a skeleton cast of a juvenile Psittacosaurus but now I also have an adult version! As it came painted, I could just have mounted it as is. But I wanted to give it a more interesting post rather than a a straight spine and tail. Since the spine and tail come in bundled segments of vertebrae. I thought I would cut them apart so that I could create curves better. And as I was modifying it anyway, I might as well improve it here and there as well. Some parts like the vertebral foramen on the vertebrae and some fenestra are filled in on the original cast. So I decided to dril some holes to make the details a bit more accurate. Size comparison with the adult and juvenile skeleton. The frame I made for the juvenile is pretty basic and primitive so I want to make a better and prettier mount for the big one. Drilling out the vertebral foramen in the middle and separating the vertebrae. Process of drilling holes and opening up the inside of the skull to more accurately reflect actual openings in a real skull. I'm not done smoothing out the new hole syet though. So right now it still looks quite ugly. More to come soon!
  12. I made this at Vo-Tech my senior year with AutoCAD and our 3D printer. Hope you all like it
  13. I've started to put together an entry for the "Paleo Re-creations" forum but it will take some time to get all the info entered in and ready to post. My first step has been to create a gallery. I've begun to garnish it with information regarding each plaster or resin cast. Currently, I have the album loaded to the gallery titled "My fossil replicas (casts in plaster and resin)." My Isotelus replica has comments attached now. I'll provide information about each image via comments. Upon completion of that task, I'll write a short article posted here on "Paleo Re-creations" describing my successes and failures so that we can have discussions regarding making fossil replicas as amateurs. I am looking forward to learning a great deal from each of you on this subject. What I know I will happy share with all of you. Bill Heimbrock - billheim@cinci.rr.com
  14. isotelus plaster cast with base

    From the album My fossil replicas (casts in plaster and resin)

    This is a plaster cast of an Isotelus maximus trilobite from the Late Ordovician of Cincinnati, Ohio that I produce for my fossil club for sale at gift shops in the area. 100% of the money goes to the club and I bill the club for the materials. Sales have been kind of slow. It's not a popular item for some reason. Not sure, but my hand paining is a little splotchy and I guess people have been desensitized to replicas because of mass production. The plaster is just plaster of Paris I buy in a big bag at hobby stores. I first spray paint the whole thing, top and bottom with grey primer. After a couple of days, I use masking tape to cover the top of the shale, leaving only the trilobite exposed. I then spray paint it with dark taupe and then with the same paint in dark brown. I immediately wipe most of the dark brown off with a paper towel, leaving the darker colors in the grooves the same way you would see it look on a real Isotelus trilobite. A final touch before removing the masking tape is to buff the trilobite with a shammy cloth or lint free cloth. Yes, I have to touch up the shale with paint after I remove the tape. The tape does not do a perfect job of masking these fine details. Send questions to the Paleo Re-Creations Forum.

    © Bill Heimbrock and the Dry Dredgers

  15. This mammoth molar was given to me a few years ago, and the owner could not tell me much about it. Based on the photos, can anyone tell me if it is real or a replica? I tried pushing a red hot pin into it to see if it was resin or not, and the pin did not go through. And based on the number of enamel ridges, does anyone know which species it might be? Thanks a lot.
  16. Sanctacaris, Cambrian Predator Replica

    This is my Sanctacaris replica I make.
  17. Cambrian Model Aysheaia

    This is another of my Burgess shale replicas
  18. As far as I am aware, the vast majority of folks here have fossil collections that were dug up by yourselves. But what would you say to casts and replicas? For most folks, it is snarge near impossible to own the skull of a Tyrannosaurus Rex, or the imprint of a 2.5 feet long Meganeura dragonfly or a 6-inch Megalodon tooth. Thus replicas and casts come into the picture, and many museums and exhibitions use reps and casts as well. Would any of you purchase casts or replicas?
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