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Found 263 results

  1. Mysterious Skull from Liaoning

    Hi, this skull is from Liaoning, China in Yixian, early Cretaceous. Any idea what it is? Whether it is reptilian or mammalian species?
  2. Permian Claw ID

    This claw was found in some micro-matrix I recently ordered, and I need help with a possible ID, I was thinking possibly Varanops or Edaphosaurus. It is advertised to be from the Ryan formation, now called the Wellington formation. The claw is just shy of one centimeter long
  3. Possible hyphalosaurus, heavily restored

    Hi all, First post on this forum. I recently purchased a collection of fossils from an estate, which were largely unlabelled. This wasn't an issue for the majority, basic Ammonites, etc. However, this was an interesting piece. I've had a look at it under a USB scope, it looks like it might be real but very heavily restored. However, I'm not an expert on these by any means. I originally thought it might have been a small Keichousaurus, but Hyphalosaurus seems to be a closer match. Would anyone have an idea on the identity, and any input on whether or not it is genuine? Thank you, John
  4. Reptile leg bone ID

    Need help ID’ing this leg bone. Is it a crocodile or turtle? I’m thinking right Humerus. Thank you for all your help Matt Aquia Formation, Paleocene, Maryland
  5. Good morning, please take a look at this artifact I discovered a few weeks ago and help me identify if this is something other than a rock with unique features and patterns. I have spent FAR too much time closely inspecting it and I'm convienced that it is something other than a naturally forming rock. Altough I'm not an expert in geology, I have collected thousands upon thousands of artifacts which is one of the reasons this one clearly stood out to me. The color, shape, pattern, and texture is very distinct. Please note that this artifact is not whole and has been broken in half. The photos are top down. What I see is a fossilized creature curled up in what could be an egg or borrow. It looks to be reptillian based off the patten of what could be the underbelly on one side of the fossil and the shape of the what I believe woud be the snout of the head (again it has been partially broken off). Also, there seems to be a long tail that wraps around the circumfrence of the unit and centered in the middle is the snout/head. When carefully observing the interior of where the break occurred, there apprears to be the spinal column (color differentation) originating from the head that may have lead to the torso as well as part of the torso. Lastly, there appears to be some digits to a claw (encircled). If anybody want to contact me for additional details, please don't hesitate.
  6. I'm seeking feedback on what exactly is this bone-looking structure. It seems to closely resemble the tip of an alligator's toes. Do you think this is something that could happen to naturally forming rock? I cropped in closely to the image so it can be clearly seen. It measures 8mm from top to tip. I would sincerely appreicate any expert insight into what this could be.
  7. Specifically on the east coast if possible, but west coast suggestions are welcome too. I've found videos of them being discovered such as the one bellow and I know which states they're in, but no specific location is given. Any and all help is very much appreciated, thank you.
  8. An archosaurian egg ?

    Hello everyone, I am a Belgian student in biology, and I love paleontology. Last week, I was walking on a slag heap near my home in the town of Marcinelle, at the coal mine called "Bois du Cazier". My attention was mainly focused on fossils of carboniferous plants (sigilaria, cordaites, calamites, etc ...). But at one point, I picked up this pretty little pebble which seemed to me to be a fossilized archosaurian egg. The slag heaps do not really respect the order of the geological layers, so it is very difficult for me to pin a year on it. I wanted to ask you if it was possible to : - confirm / deny that it is a fossilized egg - date it approximately, in view of the material that composes it (in my opinion, it should belong to the Mesozoic area, because of the colour and the fact that it was necessary to logically pass through this layer when digging, before arriving at the carboniferous veins) - identify the order, maybe the family to which he may have belonged. Please excuse-me for my bad English, Thank you in advance for your answers !
  9. Whitby Vertebrae

    Just opened this nodule on a beach in the Whitby area, I can’t help thinking that it looks like a couple of verts, can anyone confirm this and maybe suggest a species? I’ll put better pics up when I get home if needed. Thank you for looking
  10. Hi all! I got a digital microscope for christmas and I'm finally getting around to uploading the photos I've taken on it. Here are some closeups I took of a piece of bone I found when I hunted the Cloverly formation in Montana for a morning back on my first ever trip out west in 2013. Looking back on that experience with the knowledge I have now, I can truly appreciate what a rare experience I had as I've learned that this particular formation is rare to be able to hunt on. I'll tell the whole story of how my family and I made it onto this ranch in the first place, but that's for another time. Pics from the cross section: Pics of the surface of the bone:
  11. Hi everyone, I've been hesitant to post this fossil on here for a while as I didn't know if I wanted to hear a response which would contradict what I had hoped this would be. However, I recognize that to maintain a reliable and accurate collection I would have to properly identify what I found. The fossil in question is a possible partial egg that I found last year in the White River formation of Wyoming (Late Eocene/Early Oligocene) w/PaleoProspectors. This formation is known to produce fossil bird and reptile eggs (in fact, someone found a large, complete egg on this ranch the week before I was out there) so I knew that there was a possibility. When I found it most of the inside still contained sediment, which I have since gently scraped away to the best of my abilities. It has an odd dent in the top and no obvious pores, but the overall shape and the apparent shell make me think this is an egg. It is 8 mm tall and about 10 mm in diameter. I want to know what you all think. I would especially like to hear the opinions of @CBchiefski @jpc @MarcoSr @Auspex@Troodon Interior of the egg before I cleaned out the matrix. After I scraped away the matrix. Here's two views of the top.
  12. Kem Kem Claw and Phalanx

    Seller doesn't know what it's from beyond claw and phalanx from Kem Kem in Morocco. Price is pretty good, so it tempts me if anyone has any idea what it's from. I have seen these crop up as raptor claws or deltadromeus claws elsewhere--which to me seems more speculative putting a name to it than it actually being from one of those species. But if anyone knows anything, that would be great.
  13. Hello! As soon as lockdown is over, my friend and I are planning a fossil trip, most likely to the Jurassic coast. Now, we've done Charmouth, Lyme Regis to death. Can anybody recommend any other good locations for finding reptile bits? The find rates don't need to be as high, but it would be nice to try somewhere new
  14. I was wondering if there are any permian to cretaceous reptile/amphibian fossils that even an newbie like me can acquire without having to dig or pay a huge price for,I looked for permian and triassic stuff and it is really hard to find such things Are barasaurus legal to buy?
  15. Lance Fm. Sacrum?

    Here's an interesting looking partial bone I found in the Lance fm. of Wyoming back in 2018 with PaleoProspectors. The guide I was with thought it could've been from the hip region of a reptile, possibly a champsosaur. After a few years of gradually improving my identification ability I now think it's a partial sacrum, but I am not sure. I want to know what my fellow forum members have to say about it.
  16. Here are my new fossils! And how my collection looks now. For size comparison the enchodus tooth to the right in the picture of the entire collection is 5,6cm long (2.2 Inches long)
  17. Please help identify

    Hi I found this rock in desert around pinion hills or lake l.a. area. Looks like has teeth jaw. I first noticed what looked like a nasal cavity..
  18. What is it

    Anyone know what kind of dinosaur? im going to start grinding on it with the dremel
  19. Whose teeth?

    I found this on a gulf coast beach near Venice Florida. There were many shark teeth and other fossils in the area. I believe it is a reptile tooth, but do not know how to tell if it is an alligator, or some other aquatic reptile. It has a fine ridge running up one side. Any clues or help with ID is appreciated.
  20. Titonian bone

    On our last hunt in the late jurassic deposits Natalie found a niece pice of bone. Marine reptiles are found in those deposits but there are also acasionaly remains of land animals like dinosaurs since the deposits were made near the coast. we have no idea of what kind of bone it is or from what it might have belonged, any imput is welcome:
  21. Charmouth bone

    I and @Pterygotus(who gave me permission to mention him in this topic) had a minor disagreement over whether or not this was bone. I thought it was bone because it displays obvious cell structure and my tour guide said it was bone. Any suggestions? thanks in advance!
  22. nj Cretaceous tooth id please

    if some one can id this tooth pleasealthough worn and ,bottom and top damaged, could it be plesiosaur
  23. Sauropterygia bones

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 13 cm long stone with three nothosaur vertebrae and another unidentified small bone piece from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). The verts are very small, especially the one beside the bone fragment. The bigger ones are about 2 cm long. Detailed pictures:
  24. Nothosaur tooth

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A nicely preserved 3 cm long Nothosaur tooth from a triassic "Bonebed" from a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg).
  25. Sauropterygia bones

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 20 cm long stone with a couple of bones from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). On the plate are two vertebrae, one rib and two unidentified bones. The quality of the bones is partly not good (especially the vert in the middle is bad preserved). The prep was not too difficult but it took quite a long time to finish it. Some more pictures:
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