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Found 18 results

  1. Do you have ice age animal bones, teeth, or tusks found in British Columbia, and want to learn more about them? Or share a story about them? If so, the British Columbia Megafauna Project wants to hear from you! Ice age animal remains are dispersed across museums and private collections and there is no synthesis on the condition of these specimens, their species, their provenience, their age, or to when they date. In effort to remedy this, we are a research group based at Simon Fraser University looking to partner with individuals to better understand the Late Pleistocene in British Columbia. Our goal is to know when these animals lived (from radiocarbon dating), information on their health and age (from the bones), composition of their diet, and how and where they moved across ice age British Columbia (using stable isotope analysis). We are traveling the province to visit collections this summer. If you are interested in analysis, we can do minimally invasive sampling on-site, and will not take away your bone, tusk, or tooth. All results will be shared with participants, and participants will be gratefully acknowledged (or maintain anonymity) in SFU Megafauna Project research. For questions, more information, or to discuss collection specimens, we can be contacted on this forum, and at: Archaeology Isotope Lab: archiso@sfu.ca Phone: 778 782 5045 Website: https://www.sfu.ca/megafauna.html
  2. I went by the Corps of Engineers office and got signed up to visit the Waco Research Pit but I forgot to ask the hours the pit is open? Does anyone know? The office is closed now, and I'm thinking of going in the morning. Russ
  3. Hello everyone, I’m writing a paper on the great white shark. Can anyone recommend good reliable sources that touch on the topics of its evolution, diet/prey, reproduction, habitat range, lifespan, etc.? Thanks a lot!
  4. Research and Maps

    I found these maps quite usefull. You may as well. These are the highest resolution maps I have found, and free no less. https://ngmdb.usgs.gov/topoview/
  5. How an Amateur Collector Changed Paleontology Forever To those of The Fossil Forum, I wish to share with you the story of Maiasaura peeblesorum and Marion Brandvold, both good mothers. Maiasaura was discovered forty years ago in June of 1978; this is the month and year of the Maiasaura. Marion and her son, David Trexler, found fossils fascinating long before Jurassic Park popularized dinosaurs. They would often take a vehicle out and go prospecting in their backyard geologic formation known as the Two Medicine. One hot summer evening when walking back to the vehicle, Marion took a small detour and came upon some tiny fossilized bones. In 1937, the Trexlers had opened a rock and jewelry store, and over the years had created a successful jewelry manufacturing and wholesale business along with their ranching interest. However, Marion's heart was always with the land and the animals, and when her husband passed away, she opened a retail store for her merchandise rather than try to keep up with the wholesale business. That way, she still had time for the ranching and rock hunting that she loved. Marion and David had discovered a partial dinosaur in 1971, and they traveled the State of Montana to compare it to all the wonderful previous discoveries they had read about that had been made in Montana. To their surprise, the only dinosaur on display in the entire State was in a little museum in the basement of the high school in Ekalaka, Montana. It had been assembled by a couple of ranchers who had worked with paleontologists from elsewhere who had come to the State, collected, and left. Chagrined that nothing was left behind when professional work was done, they decided to start a small museum in the back of the family store. The goal was to display a dinosaur skeleton from their local area. After all, if ranchers from Ekalaka could do it, so could they. As far as professional training was concerned, Marion had to rely on her familiarity with the ecology of the modern world, as she had no formal education on the subject. However, a ranch foreman when she was young had taught her the art of tracking, and had shown her how each organism interacted with other organisms and its environment. So, when looking for fossil skeletons, Marion expected to see very young and very old animal pieces, but not much in-between. On the fateful evening mentioned previously, Marion, Dave, and Dave's wife, Laurie, were out collecting what they believed to be a fairly complete duckbilled dinosaur skeleton. It is a long, tedious job collecting all the bones present in a dinosaur, and they had uncovered 15 or so at that point. As tools were being put away, Marion went for a little walk, and when Dave and Laurie caught up with her, she was sitting on a small mound of dirt with a big smile on her face. She said, "look what I found!" She was holding several baby dinosaur vertebrae. Within a few minutes, they had found many more, and Dave had found a piece of a jaw with obviously duckbilled dinosaur teeth attached. However, the entire jaw section could be covered by a nickel! They had a baby dinosaur to go with their adult in the museum. Bill Clemens, a mammal paleontologist from Berkely, had stopped in Marion's shop on his way to dig on fossil fish with some colleagues, and was impressed with what had been done in creating a fossil museum without any formal training. At the fish site, he encouraged Jack Horner, then a fossil preparator at Princeton, and Jack's friend Bob Makela, a high school teacher from Rudyard, Montana, to stop at Marion's shop and see the displays. A few days later, Jack and Bob left the fish site and visited Marion's rock shop and museum. Jack introduced himself to Marion, and for the next few hours, they had a wonderful time going over the specimens Marion had on display. Jack then asked if she had anything else, and she showed him a couple of the vertebrae she had picked up from the baby site. Jack's interest was immediately piqued, and he asked if she had more. Marion directed him across the street to where Dave was reassembling the baby bones they had collected. Jack realized immediately that Marion and Dave had something they didn't understand. He asked, "do you know what you have here?", and Dave replied, "Obviously not, since you are so excited." The concept of babies and old animals dying and being preserved in the fossil record, it turned out, was only partially correct. While that cycle probably did occur, baby bones were generally not preserved in the fossil record. The bones Bob and Jack were staring at turned out to be the first baby dinosaur remains known from North America. Jack asked to be allowed to borrow the fossils in order to write them up in a formal publication. The bones were carefully wrapped and placed in a coffee can, and Jack transported them to Princeton. A visit to the site was also in order, and Marion and Dave took Jack and Bob out to the site. Dave also showed Jack a poorly preserved skull that Laurie had discovered, and Jack offered to try to remove it and clean it up for display in Marion's museum. However, after a few years and the specimen was recovered and prepared, it turned out to be the type skull for Maiasaura, and Laurie donated it to Museum of the Rockies, where Jack was working by then. Baby dinosaurs together in a nest past hatching showed a totally different picture of what dinosaurs were thought to be. Jack returned for many years, and eventually the Museum of the Rockies purchased the land where the babies were discovered. The area has become a mecca for paleontological research. The discovery of all this led to a massive shift in the view paleontologist and indeed science as a whole had for extinct animals and modern reptiles. A realization occurred that dinosaurs were truly living, breathing, majestic animals who cared for their young, much like the life we often see around us today. Hungry and thirsty, often looking for a mate, just trying to stay alive in an unforgiving world were the dinosaurs. Far from terrible lizards, they were much like animals and we humans are today. All this came from Marion’s tiny little find. It was her tiny find which led to a surge of interest and public attention. It was her tiny find which started Jack Horner’s career. It was her tiny find that indirectly caused Spielberg to help create Jurassic Park which in turn inspired many into paleontology and many more into other sciences. Those she indirectly inspired have contributed a near inconceivable amount to mankind through science. They range from medical researchers curing diseases, to those looking for extraterrestrial life, and all the way down to myself. A great many started their interest in the sciences with an early love of fossils and dinosaurs. A love Marion Branvold started and continues through her past contribution. Sadly, I never had the opportunity to meet her and she passed away in 2014, at the age of 102. Over the course of my short time in paleontology, I had the honor to stand where her tiny find was made. As the search for more discoveries continues I have been privileged to search with both Jack Horner and Dave Trexler. In the great quest for knowledge, she played her part well, now it is for us to carry on with the next act. What a massive contribution from an amateur and so tiny a find. As others ogle over the next major discovery, keep all this in mind and tell us more of your own tiny find. Eric P. Made with great assistance by David Trexler
  6. It's great to see that this board is so active, and that there's such a good, positive atmosphere here for amateur-professional interaction. So, in that spirit, it seems that there's scope for a new permanent topic. There is a wealth of extraordinary fossils in the collections here, and we've seen the rewards that a good collaboration can bring in the gallery... and there are probably also a lot of palaeontologists, around the world, who would love something specific to work on that is a bit inaccessible for them. There may also be people working on monographs of particulalr groups from particular areas. Why not give them a place to advertise their needs? There's also the issue of collectors/amateurs who have found something they feel ought to be described, but can't find anyone who wants to do it. A parallel thread showcasing available new fossils might also be a really good avenue to go down. At the moment, the site probably isn't on the radar of most palaeontological researchers (including some of the amateur ones), but there are places like the Palaeonet listserver where this board could be brought to their attention. It could really start building some hefty bridges, if the idea takes off. I've certainly got a 'want' or two that I could throw in to begin with! Is this a route the forum would like to go down, at least to try it? I'm happy to announce it on Palaeonet, if so!
  7. Hi all, Someone has told me that researchers generally can't publish papers on fossils that are retained in private collections, but i am unconvinced. Is this really the case? I'm drawing a blank on thinking of notable examples of fossils that have been published which are held in a private collection, but i'm sure such cases exist. Perhaps anyone on this forum has a personal example of a situation where a fossil they found was published in the literature and that they still have ownership of it? What if someone finds a fossil and a cast is made for study but the original is kept by the finder. Is this really a problem for research procedures?
  8. I have just started searching recentley have alwayd been interested. Been finding some coral fossil chunks up by lake erie in ohio. Really got me interested in searching. I have been researching but i am still a little confused and coukd use some tips and instruction on what to be looking for and where to look! I have no one iam learning from trying to self teach and iam reading but the words are not translating to the search thank you!
  9. I'm looking to add a specimen to Collections (my blastoid, seen at this link: LINK), and I'm hung up on Order and Family. My field guide gave me the genus and species, and Wikipedia gave me the Class, but I can't seem to find any sites online that routinely show Order and Family--except TFF's Collections, which doesn't (yet!) include any blastoids. Can anyone point me to a resource where I can find this info for a variety of Devonian and Ordovician fossils?
  10. New research says T. Rex couldn't run

    From my local university http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/tyrannosaurus-rex-couldnt-run-says-new-research/
  11. AMNH papers made public

    I'm not sure if this has been posted anywhere else on the forum. If it has, I apologize. AMNH has digitized all of its research papers and made them available to the public for free. All you need to do is clink on the link below and type the subject you wish to search. . http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/5/discover
  12. …..One of many match boxes passed onto me by one of the longest serving members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. With the promise of giving the fossils (which are encased inside) some much needed TLC. The majority of these housed match box fossils were collected in the mid-1980s. A brief scribble on the box or a very small moth eaten note is supplied with the contents, with very little other information attached. But for me that’s where the fun begins. As you push the somewhat tatty draws of the match boxes open, a story to research unfolds. With the British Palaeozoic, Mesozoic and Caenozoic books to hand I begin. These are clearly Brachiopods with a penned clue “Filey Brigg “but why, when and how have they come to be!
  13. Interesting debate , I'm finding it difficult to comprehend. All suggestions welcome, I've qouted the headline below , with the link. "In these austerity-hardened times, why should palaeontology be funded over health research, team sports and performing arts?" https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/nov/09/is-palaeontology-a-waste-of-public-money?CMP=share_btn_tw
  14. I shall be visiting " Darwin's " The Sandwalk this week. For some deep thinking on plesiosaurs. http://www.aboutdarwin.com/pictures/Sandwalk/Sandwalk.html Where do you like to ponder on fossils
  15. Dear all, As of late I have been in discussion with a researcher from the Ammonoid Palaeobiology Lab at the University of Bath in England (https://aplbath.wordpress.com/projects/). The researcher is interested in using Ammonoids/Ammonites from the Norian through to Hettangian for conducting a study. He is specifically interested in using specimens from private collections to augment his research (which delights me, because I am all for amateur-academic collaboration!). I think this would be an excellent opportunity to demonstrate the usefulness of private collections. I am going to donate some specimens for research, and it would be great if other collectors could assist me as I don't have many specimens. YOU DO NOT have to donate the specimens; you can lend them (depending on if they are suitable specimens). If you have any questions, or specimens you are interested in loaning or donating I would love to hear from you and we can discuss it further. I should mention if costs (i.e. shipping) are an issue I assure you we can get around this without you being out of pocket. Please let me know if you have any questions. Best wishes, Joe
  16. Help With An Ongoing Research.

    Hi, there. I am seeking for help on an ongoing research. You see, there is two fossil sites in wich I work as a graduate student. We are developing a new method to identify isolated Bison teeth using multivariate statistics. Until now we beign able to differentiate between two ecotypes, a large form and a small form. These are not sexual differences (we alrealy test them and find the sexual difference does not correspond with our findings). The help I need now is if you know someone or directly posess skulls of fossil North American fossil bisons with attached teeth. I only need to identify your skulls and to measure all individual teeth. I currently use 5 variables and all I need is to measure them. Of course, I don't need you to send me the fossils or something like that, I just need you to measure them and send me close up pictures with a scale bar. The species I look for are Bison latifrons (giant bison) and Bison antiquus (ancient bison). I'm already seeking for museum's collections but they have few skulls with teeth on them. If know museums wich have a large number of them I appreciate you give me some info. This are the teeth I need to measure in the upper jaw. I'm also looking for some jaws that are associated with skulls in order to identify the species. This are the teeth I need to measure in the lower jaw. I will be very very thankfull if you can help me people. Thank you very much for reading. HAVE A NICE DAY.
  17. Recently, guidelines for posting in the ID section were put in the FAQ section: "Identification Posting For The Uninitiated". There, handy tips are provided to help people pose their ID questions in such a way that other members get the information needed to help them come to a conclusive identification (good photographs, any available age/locality data, etc.). All in all a very useful shortlist. However, reading it I felt something was missing. If someone takes the trouble of producing good photographs and provides all age/locality data he/she has, then this person deserves an answer to match the effort. Therefore, it would be nice if "Identification Posting For The Uninitiated" also includes a "how to properly respond" section. Not sure whether I am in the position to write this, but here are a few things I believe would help posters who respond to ID requests provide answers that are of better assistance with identification. >Please provide your arguments as to why you come to a certain identification (diagnostic features visible on presented photo, age constraints, etc.). These arguments are much more educative than the species name you provide: "what properties do I need to pay attention to if I want to distinguish X from Y?" (Being grossly similar to some specimen on a photo found online is a rather poor argumentation if without any additional reasoning.) >Please accept uncertainty. Sometimes specimens are too poorly preserved (i.e. lacking diagnostic features) and cannot be identified up to species or even generic level. In these cases, providing an identification up to some higher hierarchical level (e.g. order, phylum) is just as valuable. Actually, it is more valuable than an incorrect (misleading) ID at the species level, if you ask me. >Please try to provide references. This could be Google images of similar specimens, but should ideally also be literature references. God knows my own answers in the ID section often don't comply with the standard set above, so I don't really have a right to talk, I guess. However, it is good for us all to have something like this to aim for while providing answers in the ID section. Also, are any additions to the list?
  18. Hi everyone, I would like to shear my blog on micropalaeontology with you, and I hope you find it helpful. It is my honour to receive and shear your opinion in micropaleontology. The blog needs time to be completed, and I am ready to know your suggestions about it. Link: Micropalaeontology Blog Regards, Majed
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