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Found 78 results

  1. Fossil Horn of ancient Rhino

    Hi all, In the 80's my uncle took a horn from an extinct ancient rhino from Indonesia. It is definately a fossil, it is like stone. And quite heavy, 3.5 kg. (The ruler is in cm) I would like to know from what kind of rhino specie it is. Has anybody an idea? Thank you very much!
  2. White River Rhino Skull Prep

    Today I got this mostly complete Subhyracodon skull from the White River formation, South Dakota. Right now it still looks a bit rough since it's been crushed a bit and there's a bunch of sediment stuck all over the place. The specimen has been pretty well stabilised. So it's not very fragile thankfully enough. Almost all the teeth are present. Only one maxillary tooth is gone and the very tip of the premaxilla is gone. The 2 posterior premax teeth are still there, but the anterior ones are gone. Roughly half of the braincase is also missing on the back of the skull. Otherwise the skull is quite complete. Initial unpacking. Starting prep outside After some exploratory prep using dental picks. I will likely start removing much of the bulk of the matrix in areas such as the orbit and nares with powered tools. The different isn't very visible right now since I was mostly working on small areas and further cleaning up areas where bone was already mostly exposed. Stay tuned for more!
  3. Another strange large molar

    I almost didn’t realize this was a tooth until I polished it with a magic eraser because the algae was so think. I found it in Florida. Any thoughts?
  4. Extinct Rhino tooth!?

    Hello. I recently found what I believe to be a M2 or M3 from a Teleoceras Proterum!?? (Common name Archer Short-legged Rhino from the late Miocene) It was found in Manatee county, Florida. It is about 2” long (50mm) by 1.5” wide (38mm). Do you agree with this ID information? I am floored by this find Thanks for looking.
  5. Bones - vertebra

    I think wooly rhino
  6. Partial Pelvis Bone

    I was hunting with a friend in an area that produces more late miocene fossils than Pleistocene fossils. But this is Florida and we have a lot of modern cows. Nothing to say that a random bone from the halocene did not slipped in here. My friend has a lot of history in Florida miocene fossils, having worked in the Bone Valley Phosphate mines for 30 years. During those years, he had found extensive large mammal fossils. He tossed this bone to me and said he thinks it is Rhino. I am looking to validate or disprove.
  7. Just wanted to share this neat piece of art my fiance' made me . Its needle felted .
  8. Hey everyone! On Wednesday, as I finally had some time, I decided to take Sara out to my favorite hunting spot: the Zandmotor (Netherlands). I definitely did not regret that decision! If you've never heard of the Zandmotor before, it's an artificial beach extension just south of The Hague, and the sand that was used was dredged from the North Sea and is full of Ice Age megafaunal mammal bones and tons of Eemian shells. If you want to see some more of my finds and hunts there, just look up "Zandmotor" in the TFF search bar and you should find a bunch of stuff When we got there it was raining, which annoyed me a little bit because the forecast said it wouldn't... The rain also makes the sand stick to the fossils which can become annoying when looking for small fossils or trying to recognize the thing you just picked up. But, having just spent an hour in the bus to get here, I didn't want to turn back immediately. Luckily the rain stopped within half an hour, and I wasn't even on the Zandmotor yet (I have to walk about an hour from the bus stop to the Zandmotor itself) and after that the weather alternated between cloudy and sunny which was nice. While I usually always take a pass by the shell banks, today I decided to only walk along the shoreline to increase the chances of finding good mammal stuff. In fact, there had been a strong eastern wind on Tuesday which helped uncover a lot of the bones and make them wash ashore. This did not go unnoticed, there were a lot indeed! Here is my first big find of the day, a great complete horse astralagus!
  9. Hi to all. Here is one drawing which i drew 3 hours ago. It's a Elasmotherium sibiricum or Siberian unicorn . Enjoy Darko
  10. From the album Vertebrates

    Juvenile Woolly Rhino (Coelodonta) Jaw - Pleistocene the bank of the LENA river near of the city Yakutsk (Yakutia, North Siberia), Russia.
  11. Pleistocene (Ice Age) fossils ID

    Hi all, Planning to better organize my small fossil collection in a single showcase, so with emphasis on Mezozoic finds I'll probably be able to devote max one shelf to the Quarternary. Would be good to clean up and recheck the ID (I know just a half anyway). So a bit of help will be appreciated:) The items: 1. Woolly mammoth tooth?
  12. I'm not a huge fan of large bones but here we go: a glimpse to mammalian fauna of California 7-12 million years ago. Video is from our Christmas break trip to South California/Nevada. My favorite was a rhino tooth.
  13. Rockhound Finds Fossil Rhino Bone

    Pooch sniffs out prehistoric prize: Canine discovers 250,000-year-old woolly rhino bone By Today, Today news, April 5, 2019 https://www.todaychan.com/2019/04/05/pooch-sniffs-out-prehistoric-prize-dog-discovers-250000-year-old-woolly-rhino-bone-2/ Yours, Paul H.
  14. Anyone know if this is legit? I saw this a little while back and was intrigued. Rhino jaw fossil from thailand. What kind of rhino would this be also? The teeth dont look like the majority of rhino teeth I have seen.
  15. I am looking for an attractive woolly rhino cave painting image, either a diagram or photograph. I want to print it 8x10 so it should have decent resolution, and I need to be free to legally reproduce it for personal use. I would like to use it for a fossil display background. Can anyone help? I already found the one below, but would like a better one if possible.
  16. https://www.sciencealert.com/climate-change-probably-slayed-the-siberian-unicorn https://cosmosmagazine.com/palaeontology/unicorns-did-exist-until-they-didn-t
  17. Take a look at this awesome new addition to my collection: an etruscan rhino vert! Got it a week ago for my birthday. Etruscan rhino lumbar vertebra Stephanorhinus cf. etruscus Novi Sad, Donau River, Hungary Pleistocene sediments; Pleistocene; 130'000 y Front Back Top
  18. Ashfall fossil beds

    Visit to Ashfall fossil beds in North East Nebraska recently. It's out of the way for about anyone, but worth a visit. I didn't get too many photos, but here are a few. The statues show the "rhino barn" in the background. A few shots inside, and the "first building" has some very cool stuff removed from the pit, and a nice section of a plesiosaur from a niobrara deposit nearby.
  19. Hunting with Steve

    Summer is usually a drag for SW Florida fossil hunting. I was flushed out of the Peace River on May 28th and have not been back. So I was commiserating (generally whining) with my pretty constant (in season) hunting buddy Steve a week ago. What can we do,, what can we do? Steve was a drag line operator for most of 25 years in Bone Valley Phosphate mines and has lived within walking distance of the Peace River most of his adult life. So, he and I both made suggestions on a Florida Fossil Focused agenda for what turned out to be yesterday!! 1) Arrive at Steve's home and unidentified fossil museum to check out some of his treasures and maybe purchase a few of my favorite tiny horse teeth from the Miocene era phosphate mines. Here are just a few of my new tiny horse teeth.... 2) Take a road trip in the Vicinity of Fort Meade, checking out feeder creeks to the Peace River, to determine whether these smaller creeks present an opportunity for fossil hunting. I am not trying to dissuade anyone but it is worth your life to go into many of the creeks I saw. As an example, little Paynes Creek is normally 1-2 feet meandering thru the woods. We went over a bridge where it was a torrent 30 feet wide and 8 foot deep. Best to wait until that subsides. 3) We were on a historical trip back in time visiting the Phosphate mines from 30 years ago and 100 years ago, passing old rusting mine buildings, cemeteries where mine towns used to be and are not any more, roads that went nowhere, huge tracks of land with no trespassing signs from MOSIAC Company. Steve talked about places he work for decades that had perfect Red Megs that no one bothered to pick up because the money was in mammal fossils. He said that in the 1970s, anyone could walk into the mines searching for fossils. The owners did not care as long as you stayed away from buildings and equipment during working hours. Kids would go searching for fossils on Sundays. 4) We were in the area , so we stopped at the Phosphate Mine Museum in Mulberry Florida. Really interesting place, I liked the baby Gomph tooth, Rhino tusk, Croc, and dugong ribs... In that 1st photo above, that is a Drag line bucket from decades ago. The museum fills the area with pebble rock that contains small fossils and tiny shark teeth from the mines. There was a family with 2 kids digging for fossils. I was fortunate to have some waste fossils in my pickup that I gave them and they thanked me profusely. I am not selective when I hunt, I pick up almost everything that is not rock, sort it out at home and on my next trip back, dump it back in the river, so broken unidentified bones, dugong ribs, ray teeth, turtle pieces, etc, etc. Sometimes fragments of gator . mammoth, mastodon, horse teeth. 5) From the museum, we went across the street for the big mac meal with fries and a drink. And then back to searching for those feeder creeks and defunct phosphate mines. All in All , it was a better fossil day than I had in over a month. We talked about visiting more local museums (Bradenton, Clewiston, Ft Myers), Steve loaned me a book on Florida Artifacts and so I have a lot of fossils activities to do for a few weeks until I need another day, hunting with Steve.
  20. Montbrook Florida Fossil Dig

    So, I volunteered to help excavate Gomphotheres or Rhinos or something from 6-10 myas under the guidance of Richard Hulbert and the University of Florida's Paleontology department. Yesterday was the last day of the October, 2017 to May 2018 digging season. It is intended to avoid the wet and rainy season. I am pleased that my work would help advance the dig, but I volunteered because I thought that I would enjoy it, and I did. I was given great directions and I arrived at the site just before 10 am. It was on a Horse/Cattle farm out in the middle of rural Florida. It was basically flat land leading to a hole surrounded at various points with Sandbags. Richard distributed volunteers to work on the accomplishment of 4 tasks: Excavate and Plaster Jacket 1 Rhino Adult Skull, 1 Gomph Baby/Juvenile skeleton, 1 Rhino baby skeleton, a femur and humerus from 1 or 2 Gomphs. I was assigned along with John, to assist an experienced volunteer, Susan in working on the baby Rhino skeleton. The Skull had not yet been found. After 2 hours of scrapping and digging around the skeleton mass with a screwdriver, we had the start of discovery trenches. If we found any small bones (usually toe or ankle bones, fish vertebrae, catfish spines, and some turtle shell and bones), we bagged them separately. Had we found anything that might be part of our rhino, we would have left it for inclusion in the plastic jacket) . Here is a photo of Susan and John as we were digging: The Rhino is between them. After about 2 hours, we reached a problem: Both trenches, mine and John's had bones in them: Richard came over to advise. I was trenching on the left, Richard's foot is next to the start of a Gomph bone going UNDER the Rhino skeleton. On the right, John s starting to uncover many bones. Richard suggested that I dig under and around the Gomph bone to see if it ended shortly and whether we had a possibility of extracting it without damage to the Rhino. He suggested that John pursue a slightly different path trying to avoid the bones. Unfortunately, John exposed the baby Rhino's bones above but could not find a clear path and I could not find a way to extract the Gomph bone. Because this was the last day and we had little or no flexibility, Richard decided to repack the baby rhino with sand, then sandbags, then more dirt/clay and finally a tarp to attempt protection from weather and floods in the wet season.. Well, maybe next time. However, the other 3 tasks were completed !!! Here is that other Adult Rhino Skull excavated, trenched, in the process of being plaster jacketed. Wrapped in a plaster jacket. After the plaster dries, Richard used a sledge hammer to drive 2 shovel heads under the Adult Rhino skull, and break thru the underlying sand and clay. Then roll it over into a steel web meshing, still a couple of steel rods thru the web mesh and get 6 pall bearers to carry the remains up the hill to the Museum van. I was one of those 6. We had a nice day, overcast to keep it a little cooler. I left at 3 pm with a 5 hour drive home. The driving rains started at about 4 pm and continued for the rest of the day. All in all, a great weekend.
  21. I am on a Trip to University of Florida at Gainesville Research & Collections Laboratory for Vertebrate, Invertebrate, and Paleobiology. This was today. Pretty busy with a Haile Quarry trip in the morning and then on Sunday a volunteer at a University of Florida fossil dig. Enough time to share some of the best photos... Most of this will be delayed until I am back home on Monday Photo #1 Teleoceras Photo# 2 Gomphothere Photo# 3 Possibly new ancestor of Gomphothere Photo# 4 Gomphothere Photo# 5 Baby Teleoceras Photo# 6 Rhizosmilodon fiteae skull held by Richard Hulbert, Director of Vertebrate Collection Lab Photo #7 Rhizosmilodon fiteae Photo #8 Bear_dog Photo #9 River Otter mandible There are details that will have to wait... Enjoy, Jack
  22. Coelodonta antiquitatis 5th cervical vertebra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The 5th cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Pleistocene
  23. Coelodonta antiquitatis 4th cervical vertebra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The 4th cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Pleistocene
  24. Coelodonta antiquitatis 3rd cervical vertebra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The 3rd cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Pleistocene
  25. Coelodonta antiquitatis 1st Dorsal Vertabra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The first dorsal vertabra of a Woolly Rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Late Pleistocene

    © Olof Moleman

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