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Found 62 results

  1. Take a look at this awesome new addition to my collection: an etruscan rhino vert! Got it a week ago for my birthday. Etruscan rhino lumbar vertebra Stephanorhinus cf. etruscus Novi Sad, Donau River, Hungary Pleistocene sediments; Pleistocene; 130'000 y Front Back Top
  2. Ashfall fossil beds

    Visit to Ashfall fossil beds in North East Nebraska recently. It's out of the way for about anyone, but worth a visit. I didn't get too many photos, but here are a few. The statues show the "rhino barn" in the background. A few shots inside, and the "first building" has some very cool stuff removed from the pit, and a nice section of a plesiosaur from a niobrara deposit nearby.
  3. Hunting with Steve

    Summer is usually a drag for SW Florida fossil hunting. I was flushed out of the Peace River on May 28th and have not been back. So I was commiserating (generally whining) with my pretty constant (in season) hunting buddy Steve a week ago. What can we do,, what can we do? Steve was a drag line operator for most of 25 years in Bone Valley Phosphate mines and has lived within walking distance of the Peace River most of his adult life. So, he and I both made suggestions on a Florida Fossil Focused agenda for what turned out to be yesterday!! 1) Arrive at Steve's home and unidentified fossil museum to check out some of his treasures and maybe purchase a few of my favorite tiny horse teeth from the Miocene era phosphate mines. Here are just a few of my new tiny horse teeth.... 2) Take a road trip in the Vicinity of Fort Meade, checking out feeder creeks to the Peace River, to determine whether these smaller creeks present an opportunity for fossil hunting. I am not trying to dissuade anyone but it is worth your life to go into many of the creeks I saw. As an example, little Paynes Creek is normally 1-2 feet meandering thru the woods. We went over a bridge where it was a torrent 30 feet wide and 8 foot deep. Best to wait until that subsides. 3) We were on a historical trip back in time visiting the Phosphate mines from 30 years ago and 100 years ago, passing old rusting mine buildings, cemeteries where mine towns used to be and are not any more, roads that went nowhere, huge tracks of land with no trespassing signs from MOSIAC Company. Steve talked about places he work for decades that had perfect Red Megs that no one bothered to pick up because the money was in mammal fossils. He said that in the 1970s, anyone could walk into the mines searching for fossils. The owners did not care as long as you stayed away from buildings and equipment during working hours. Kids would go searching for fossils on Sundays. 4) We were in the area , so we stopped at the Phosphate Mine Museum in Mulberry Florida. Really interesting place, I liked the baby Gomph tooth, Rhino tusk, Croc, and dugong ribs... In that 1st photo above, that is a Drag line bucket from decades ago. The museum fills the area with pebble rock that contains small fossils and tiny shark teeth from the mines. There was a family with 2 kids digging for fossils. I was fortunate to have some waste fossils in my pickup that I gave them and they thanked me profusely. I am not selective when I hunt, I pick up almost everything that is not rock, sort it out at home and on my next trip back, dump it back in the river, so broken unidentified bones, dugong ribs, ray teeth, turtle pieces, etc, etc. Sometimes fragments of gator . mammoth, mastodon, horse teeth. 5) From the museum, we went across the street for the big mac meal with fries and a drink. And then back to searching for those feeder creeks and defunct phosphate mines. All in All , it was a better fossil day than I had in over a month. We talked about visiting more local museums (Bradenton, Clewiston, Ft Myers), Steve loaned me a book on Florida Artifacts and so I have a lot of fossils activities to do for a few weeks until I need another day, hunting with Steve.
  4. Montbrook Florida Fossil Dig

    So, I volunteered to help excavate Gomphotheres or Rhinos or something from 6-10 myas under the guidance of Richard Hulbert and the University of Florida's Paleontology department. Yesterday was the last day of the October, 2017 to May 2018 digging season. It is intended to avoid the wet and rainy season. I am pleased that my work would help advance the dig, but I volunteered because I thought that I would enjoy it, and I did. I was given great directions and I arrived at the site just before 10 am. It was on a Horse/Cattle farm out in the middle of rural Florida. It was basically flat land leading to a hole surrounded at various points with Sandbags. Richard distributed volunteers to work on the accomplishment of 4 tasks: Excavate and Plaster Jacket 1 Rhino Adult Skull, 1 Gomph Baby/Juvenile skeleton, 1 Rhino baby skeleton, a femur and humerus from 1 or 2 Gomphs. I was assigned along with John, to assist an experienced volunteer, Susan in working on the baby Rhino skeleton. The Skull had not yet been found. After 2 hours of scrapping and digging around the skeleton mass with a screwdriver, we had the start of discovery trenches. If we found any small bones (usually toe or ankle bones, fish vertebrae, catfish spines, and some turtle shell and bones), we bagged them separately. Had we found anything that might be part of our rhino, we would have left it for inclusion in the plastic jacket) . Here is a photo of Susan and John as we were digging: The Rhino is between them. After about 2 hours, we reached a problem: Both trenches, mine and John's had bones in them: Richard came over to advise. I was trenching on the left, Richard's foot is next to the start of a Gomph bone going UNDER the Rhino skeleton. On the right, John s starting to uncover many bones. Richard suggested that I dig under and around the Gomph bone to see if it ended shortly and whether we had a possibility of extracting it without damage to the Rhino. He suggested that John pursue a slightly different path trying to avoid the bones. Unfortunately, John exposed the baby Rhino's bones above but could not find a clear path and I could not find a way to extract the Gomph bone. Because this was the last day and we had little or no flexibility, Richard decided to repack the baby rhino with sand, then sandbags, then more dirt/clay and finally a tarp to attempt protection from weather and floods in the wet season.. Well, maybe next time. However, the other 3 tasks were completed !!! Here is that other Adult Rhino Skull excavated, trenched, in the process of being plaster jacketed. Wrapped in a plaster jacket. After the plaster dries, Richard used a sledge hammer to drive 2 shovel heads under the Adult Rhino skull, and break thru the underlying sand and clay. Then roll it over into a steel web meshing, still a couple of steel rods thru the web mesh and get 6 pall bearers to carry the remains up the hill to the Museum van. I was one of those 6. We had a nice day, overcast to keep it a little cooler. I left at 3 pm with a 5 hour drive home. The driving rains started at about 4 pm and continued for the rest of the day. All in all, a great weekend.
  5. I am on a Trip to University of Florida at Gainesville Research & Collections Laboratory for Vertebrate, Invertebrate, and Paleobiology. This was today. Pretty busy with a Haile Quarry trip in the morning and then on Sunday a volunteer at a University of Florida fossil dig. Enough time to share some of the best photos... Most of this will be delayed until I am back home on Monday Photo #1 Teleoceras Photo# 2 Gomphothere Photo# 3 Possibly new ancestor of Gomphothere Photo# 4 Gomphothere Photo# 5 Baby Teleoceras Photo# 6 Rhizosmilodon fiteae skull held by Richard Hulbert, Director of Vertebrate Collection Lab Photo #7 Rhizosmilodon fiteae Photo #8 Bear_dog Photo #9 River Otter mandible There are details that will have to wait... Enjoy, Jack
  6. Coelodonta antiquitatis 5th cervical vertebra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The 5th cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Pleistocene
  7. Coelodonta antiquitatis 4th cervical vertebra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The 4th cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Pleistocene
  8. Coelodonta antiquitatis 3rd cervical vertebra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The 3rd cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Pleistocene
  9. Coelodonta antiquitatis 1st Dorsal Vertabra

    From the album Mammal Fossils

    Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799) The first dorsal vertabra of a Woolly Rhino. Location: North Sea, Netherlands Age: Late Pleistocene

    © Olof Moleman

  10. Christmas Presents

    The holidays are here. I am running out of days. I have gone hunting 3 times between Sunday and today, in really cold temps for Florida. Today I am on a flight to Connecticut, then Atlanta, and South Carolina returning on the 26th. It will be great to see family and friends in cooler climates. Yesterday, I was at a new location for me, hunting with 2 fossil addicted friends. It was cool but not frigid and a lot of fun sharing stories and talking Florida fossils. One hunting buddy is a Florida Bone Valley Fossil/Meg/Artifact dealer. I met him 5-6 years ago when he invited me over to see his collection. There was a large Rhino tooth that I really loved, but felt was way beyond my budget. But every time I would visit his collection, I would envy that tooth. This year I decided to purchase that tooth... Step up to the plate for my Christmas present. It was plucked out of the Bone Valley phosphate mines in the mid 1980s and I know right where this beauty is going into my growing Florida Rhino collection. Those of you who are overly observant my have noted a Meg pointed to by my index finger. My friend may have thought he was overpricing the Rhino tooth, so he added a BV Meg as a Christmas present. I had a GREAT day yesterday. This one is a little dinged up but easy to get excited over. He purchases a lot of his inventory but he FOUND this one on private property. Think about that.. looking down and seeing this beauty. Happy Holiday to all my TFF friends. May you get the presents you desire!
  11. Early rhino skulls

    I'm looking for some help from any expert of the White River Badlands to help with the ID of these two partial fossils skulls I'm working on prepping. I purchased both of these at auction from old collections so sadly I don't know the locations they were collected, but I'm confident that they're White River specimens from the Oligocene. I'm pretty sure that both of these are examples of early rhinos like Subhyracodon and Hyracodon but I'd love some help with ID if possible. The first skull (first 3 photos with the darker teeth) is the largest at roughly 25cm across (although this is partial skull only) and has beautifully preserved teeth (albeit a very fragmented skull). The second skull has lost a few teeth (second 3 photos with more orange colored teeth) but the skull is better preserved - roughly 22cm across - this one as a much shorter snout. Both skulls have a reverse side hidden by matrix which I'm yet to remove. I'm hoping that the preservation is better on the other side. Looking at these closely, I believe these are two different species as the dentition looks different. I'd welcome anyone's thoughts.
  12. Rhino Jaw Repair

    Next prep job is a major repair. This poor jaw discovered what happens when potential energy is converted to kinetic energy! It needs some serious oral work. I'm using PVA adhesive where possible and Paleobond where I have to. Most of the bone is very porous so the PVA will hold well once set (it takes several hours). Here's the jaw after an hour of consolidation and piecing back together. Later today, or tomorrow, I'll continue the gluing process. Originally, this jaw was put together with something like Gorilla Glue and it's all over the place in one side. Once I have it back together, I'll scribe off the glue and do some restoration on the cracks.
  13. Please help with several bones

    Dear Guys, I recently found some bones that are difficult to me to identify- possible mammoth rib proximal end, rhino zugoma and unidentified radius bone in Late Pleistocene sand layers of Varena Town, South Lithuania (it is Eastern Europe). The width of mammoth rib proximal end is 6,2 cm in the articular part, the bone layer in the cross section is massive. The length of possible rhino zygomatic bone is 5,6 cm and it has specific texture in the skull surface near eye. It is also massive and I see that thickness of bone is about 1,5 cm. The partial radius is 10,2 cm length and 3 cm width in the lower articular part. Any idea what this should be? Best Regards Domas
  14. Hi, A few weeks back I posted in the ID section about a fragment of mammal molar I had found whilst collecting at Hamstead. The Hamstead to Bouldnor coast is an Eocene/Oligocene locality and one the best sites in the UK for tertiary vertebrate remains from crocodiles, turtles, fish, and quite frequently mammals too, and was deposited in a paludal environment in the Hampshire Basin. I was aware it was a fragment of a rhinoceros tooth but couldn't be sure if it was from a more modern Pleistocene type like Stephanorhinus or a much more older rhinocerotid like Ronzotherium, an early hornless rhinoceros which is a a very rare part of the post Grande Coupre mammal fauna found in the Bouldnor Fm. Only 6 finds attributed to Ronzotherium have been discovered here since the late-19th century, the last record I can find is from 1999, all have been referred to the species romani. After the suggestions of some users on this forum and further research online I excitingly noticed some similarities to the molars of Ronzotherium. Straight away I contacted Dr Martin Munt, the curator at the Isle Of Wight's paleontological museum 'Dinosaur Isle' to bring the find to his attention in case it was from Ronzotherium. He passed the images on to colleagues at the Natural History Museum in London, who confirmed the molar as being from Ronzotherium. This was really exciting news to hear considering the rarity of material like this in the Bouldnor fm. The museum staff were really excited too and asked if it would be possible for me to bring the specimen in for them to borrow for a period and look at it in further detail. Suffice to say the molar is on it's way to the museum tomorrow afternoon to be dropped off and spend some time the laboratories there, and if needs be I'm more than happy to make a permanent donation to help learn more about the species and the UK's tertiary past. It's a really exciting find that I feel really lucky to have discovered, and definitely makes 6am starts and Saturday mornings scrambling through fallen trees and mudslides worth it! (I've attached a picture of the specimen below along with a reconstruction of the species, the proto and metaloph are present and so is an intact lingual valley, the enamel is also really well preserved)
  15. Possible rhino bone found

    Dear Guys, I have found one interesting piece of bone which is quite hard to identify. The mammal specialists said that it is femoral head and I saw that the end of a rhino femur looks quite similar. The same thing could be with hippo, too. It is 8,8 cm length. Any idea what is this? Best regards Domas
  16. Partial Rhino Jaw prep

    I got this broken up jaw recently and finished putting it together (and some cleaning) today. I still have a little matrix to remove, but it's already good looking Its from the White River Formation in Wyoming. I'm not 100% certain on ID but I'd pretty sure it can be called Subhyracodon sp.
  17. Big mammal vert from North Sea

    Hi everyone! I received this vert from the Natuurhistorisch Museum Rotterdam. It was in a big box with many other fossils fished from the North Sea (Pleistocene). The size of the vert makes me think of rhino or bison, even possibly mammoth. I asked already on Fossiel.net and they said it could be a chest vert from a bovid or a horse. But no definitive answer came up... What do you all think? Any help appreciated, Max
  18. Coelodonta antiquitatis cervical vertebra

    Fourth cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino.
  19. Coelodonta antiquitatis cervical vertebra

    Third cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino.
  20. Hi all, I have a Ogliocene-aged partial fossil jaw from the White Rivers Badlands. The seller identified this as a Hyracodon nebraskensis. It measures 2.8 inches across. However, two other friends with White Rivers fossils protested this ID. One said it's Subhyracodon instead. The other believes it could be Oreodont. Can anyone tell if this is a rhino? Thank you.
  21. Coelodonta antiquitatis cervical vertebra

    5th cervical vertebra of a woolly rhino.
  22. Coelodonta antiquitatis axis vertebra

    Axis vertebra of a woolly rhino.
  23. Coelodonta antiquitatis atlas vertebra

    Atlas vertebra of a woolly rhino.
  24. Coelodonta antiquitatis ulna

    The left ulna of a woolly rhino. The distal joint is missing.
  25. Coelodonta antiquitatis ulna

    The right ulna of a woolly rhino. The distal joint is missing.
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