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Found 10 results

  1. A post by Tony on STH teeth a while back peaked my interest in extant sawfish rostral teeth. The two extant sawfish genera are Pristis and Anoxypristis. There is only a single extant Anoxypristis species, Anoxypristis cuspidata (Knifetooth or Narrow Sawfish). There are 4 extant species of Pristis, Pristis clavata (Dwarf Sawfish), Pristis pectinata (Smalltooth Sawfish), Pristis pristis (Largetooth Sawfish), and Pristis zijsron (Green Sawfish) Last 2016. This post is about a Pristis pristis (Largetooth Sawfish) rostrum. If you would also like to see pictures of an Anoxypristis cuspidata rostrum and/or a Pristis pectinata rostrum check out my previous TFF posts at the links below: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83865-extant-anoxypristis-cuspidata-knifetooth-or-narrow-sawfish-rostrum/&tab=comments#comment-895466 http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/86239-extant-pristis-pectinata-smalltooth-sawfish-rostrum/&tab=comments#comment-932077 Below is a picture of a Pristis pristis sawfish and other information from Last, White, de Carvalho, Seret, Stehmann, Naylor 2016 “Rays of the World: This rostrum is 19.5 inches by 3.5 inches at the posterior most rostral teeth. Pristis pristis rostrums have 14-24 equally spaced rostral teeth per side with the posterior most teeth located near the base of rostrum. This rostrum has 19 left and 18 right rostral teeth (Note one tooth is missing on the left side) and is shown below in dorsal and ventral views: Here is the basal view of the rostrum (shows a thin layer of skin with a good amount of cartilage visible): Dorsal side, two pictures of placoid scales on the rostrum surface with the second picture a close-up picture: Ventral Side, two pictures of placoid scales on the rostrum surface with the second picture a close-up picture: Continued in next reply Marco Sr.
  2. Lyme Regis Trip

    Firstly apologies for the lateness of this post, spent a week down in Lyme Regis from the 17th of December. Was out most evenings and some mornings due to the tide times, however i found hunting at night just as productive and with a lot less competition! The weather had been incredibly rough and was a bit unsettling at night when you could hear parts of the cliff falling down! The first few nights i mainly found ammonites and a few pieces of rolled bone (no photos of these, can put some up if anyone wishes me too) Best find was a partial ichthyosaur rostrum from below the Black Ven. Unfortunately no teeth and it has been very well rolled! None the less i was most pleased to find it. Found a couple more nice sized ammonites covered in pyrite and one well worn vertebra. See attached images. If anyone would like anymore photos please do not hesitate to ask. All in all a good week. Thanks for reading.
  3. I have had the pleasure over the last few years to get to know George Phillips , Paleontologist for the Mississippi Museum of Natural History. He is a long-term friend to the amateur community and a heck of an outstanding fossil expert. I enjoyed prepping various fossils for George and the museum of the last few years. Here are a couple pics.
  4. A post by @ynot on STH teeth a while back peaked my interest in extant sawfish rostral teeth. The two extant sawfish genera are Pristis and Anoxypristis. There is only a single extant Anoxypristis species, Anoxypristis cuspidata (Knifetooth or Narrow Sawfish). There are 4 extant species of Pristis, Pristis clavata (Dwarf Sawfish), Pristis pectinata (Smalltooth Sawfish), Pristis pristis (Largetooth Sawfish), and Pristis zijsron (Green Sawfish) Last 2016. I borrowed a Pristis pectinata (Smalltooth Sawfish) rostrum from a friend so I could take pictures of it. This rostrum is from a sawfish caught off of the West coast of South Florida many years ago. If you would also like to see pictures of an Anoxypristis cuspidata rostrum check out my previous TFF post at the link below: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83865-extant-anoxypristis-cuspidata-knifetooth-or-narrow-sawfish-rostrum/&tab=comments#comment-895466 A Pristis pectinata rostrum is 21-30 % of total sawfish length. Pristis pectinata reach a total length of at least 554 cm with reports of 760 cm total length likely exaggerations. Last 2016. This rostrum is 10” long so it is from a juvenile sawfish. Pristis pectinata rostrums have 20-30 rostral teeth per side. This rostrum has 25/27 rostral teeth (Note some are damaged and/or missing) and is shown below in dorsal and ventral views: The basal view of the rostrum (20 mm by 5 mm) shows placoid scales and a thin layer of skin on the dorsal side and on the ventral side above the cartilage of the rostrum. Dorsal side, placoid scales covering the rostrum surface: Ventral Side, placoid scales covering the rostrum surface: Edit: Note I should have stated that these rostral teeth are smooth without a posterior groove. That is a rostral tooth trait of young Pristis pectinata sawfish. I didn't notice this until I just looked at the rostral teeth again after reading that young Pristis pectinata sawfish rostral teeth don't have the posterior groove in Last, White, de Carvalho, Seret, Stehmann, Naylor 2016 Rays of the World. The below picture shows a first anterior rostral tooth (10 mm) that is smooth without a posterior groove. Below are pictures of 8 different rostral teeth (5 mm to 12 mm vertical height) 6 rostral teeth dorsal views: 2 rostral teeth ventral views: Fossil Pristis cf lathami rostral tooth (2.25”) from the Eocene of Virginia for comparison to the extant Pristis teeth: Unfortunately now Pristis pectinata is a critically endangered species. Over fishing has not only drastically reduced their numbers but it has also drastically reduced the size of the largest members of the species. Populations are now fragmented and this species is considered to be extinct through most of its original range. Marco Sr.
  5. Ichthyosaur Partial Rostrum

    Visited Port Mulgrave on the 10th March and found some lovely Ammonites then walked the shoreline to Staithes. Those of you who know the coast will be aware that whilst there are fossils at the Staithes end, it is Port Mulgrave and a few spots in between that are the most productive. Imagine my surprise, with the Cod and Lobster pub in sight at the end of my trip, when I looked down at the smaller of the two pieces just sitting there. After an hour searching the area I found the larger part which is a perfect fit. The pieces are very weathered and I think may have been exposed high up in the upper lias for quite some time. I have been back twice but nothing else has come down yet. The rest may well be up there. There is no pyrite present but it is too advanced a prep job for me so I have taken it to Mike Marshal of Sandsend. I know you can't make a silk purse from a pigs ear but he will no doubt work wonders. It is my best every find and I don't know if I will ever experience the same excitement fossil lint. Amazing.
  6. IOW UK dino

    Kats Looking forward to the dental microwear analysis already
  7. Alabama Cretaceous oddity

    Collected this specimen this past week in my favorite creek in south-central Alabama. Geology is Ripley Fm., Selma Group, Upper Cretaceous (early Maastrichtian). It is about 11.5 cm. long by 4.5 cm wide at its' widest point, and about 1.5 cm thick. I don't see any bone or cartilaginous structure on the ends, and there is no evidence of sutures observed in baculites from the same formation. I would appreciate any comments as to its' ID. Thanks.-- George
  8. Ichthyosaur rostrum 2 (other side)

    From the album Marine reptiles

    Ichthyosaur rostrum found on beach below Black Ven, Charmouth, U.K.
  9. Ichthyosaur rostrum 1

    From the album Marine reptiles

    Ichthyosaur rostrum found on beach below Black Ven, Charmouth, U.K.
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