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Found 20 results

  1. Around Salt Lake City in 3 Days

    So I’m still snowed in so here’s a trip from warm Early June. My friends and I wanted to hit all the closest rock locations around Salt Lake City and search for fossils and cool sedimentary geology (a couple of them being sedimentary geologists). We visited the Southern Oquirrh Mountains and a few canyons over on the east side of the valley at the base of the Wasatch Mountains. Here are the stratigraphy columns for both provided by Geolgic History of Utah by Lehi F. Hintze and Bart J. Kowallis. I did not lead this trip so I am not certain which rock layers the fossils were each from (I’ll point out the ones I do know) but I’ll say we went through the Cambrian and Mississippian in the Oquirrh Mountains and basically everywhere on the Salt Lake City column.
  2. As there are some polished fossil-rock specimens from this formation in the Christmas auction, I would like to present some background info with (mostly) some field photographs, so I have put this in “Fossil Hunting Trips”. The Palaeozoic of Graz is a thrust sheet within the Eastern Alps, composed of Silurian to Pennsylvanian sediments. It consists of three separate nappes, the most fossiliferous formation is the Plabutsch-formation within the Rannach nappe. This Devonian formation is of Eifelian age (ca. 395 Ma), about 100 m thick and mostly made up of a very dark, gray-blueish to black, fine-grained, thickly bedded limestone. Superficially, it weathers to a medium to light grey color. Geological map of Styria with the Palaeozoic of Graz situated north of Graz. Stratigraphic column of the Rannach nappe of the Palaeozoic of Graz, Plabutsch-formation is Nr. 4. From Hubmann & Gross, 2015. Thicknesses of formations are not to scale! The Plabutsch-formation crops out at various places to the west and north of Graz and more than 100 fossil sites are known within this formation. The most abundant fossils are corals, brachiopods, stromatoporids and crinoid fragments. Other fossils like gastropods, bivalves or trilo-bits are very rare. In a paper from 1975, about 50 coral species are listed, but less than 10 are abundant: Tabulata: Favosites styriacus Penecke, 1894 Pachycanalicula barrandei (Penecke, 1887) Thamnopora boloniensis (Gosselet, 1877) Thamnopora reticulata (Blainville, 1830) Striatiopora? suessi Penecke, 1894 Rugosa: Thamnophyllum stachei Penecke, 1894 Zelophyllia cornuvaccinum (Penecke, 1894) Do you feel that there is something strange with this list? Yes, it is! Most species have their type locality within this formation and were first described by Penecke, except T. boloniensis (T. reticulata was also erected by Penecke as Pachypora orthostachys and later synonymized with an earlier described species). In my opinion, this does not reflect a high degree of endemism, but an urgent need for revision… The most abundant fossil is Favosites styriacus, which can form massive colonies up to 0.5 m in size. Here is an example from Hohe Rannach Mt. (1018 m) north of Graz, photo 05/26/2018, Col-Nr. 4093, length of pocket knife is 9 cm: As most fossils in this formation, it was found in scree and float in a wooded area. Nr. 4093 is waiting near the pocket knife toward the lower right corner… Another Favosites styriacus, north of Fürstenstand Mt. (754 m), northwest of Graz, photo 10/30/2015, not in collection. Tabulae are very well visible, weathering is usually your friend there!
  3. Horn corals?

    Hi everyone, My niece found this item in Cape May NJ. During the years, I have found many Bryozoan pieces as well as many Tabulata and Rugosa. She thinks its a tooth... to me it looks like a colony of horn (Rugosa) corals.... what do you think? Thanks Pedro
  4. Hi! I just received a couple nice works on Fossils. In Index Fossils of North America (1959) I see Pycnostylus (Fletcheria) listed as a Tabulate! (Subclass Schizocoralla) (Whitleaves 1884) Fossilworks lists subclass Rugosa fosillid shows the following: Hill, 1981. Rugosa and Tabulata Ivanovskiy, 1965. Fossil Rugosa Wow! What a way to confuse a newbie! My specimens I found match the illustrations and descriptions in Index Fossils, I am happy to say. It must be the German in me, but I go nuts for accurate taxonomy (when I can get it). How can this change? How can it be BOTH rugosa and tabulata? Can it? I know some things change with further research.... but THIS should be fairly elementary!!??!! I know the index is older... but I would not think THIS would change much up to today! Species, yes. Even genus, perhaps. But subclass? Sorry if I'm a bit confused! Hoping someone can shed some light on this! David Ruckser
  5. Great day in Paulding, Ohio

    First trip of the year today to the "Fossil Gardens" at Paulding, Ohio. This is quarry spoil of mid-Devonian age, Silica Formation. There was not a cloud in the sky, and temps were relatively warm at 43 deg. F. I was the only one there for most of the day, and it was extremely peaceful. What a great day. Here are pics of some of the finds. These are "farm fresh" and haven't even been washed yet, but I did take time to polish some horn corals and get some acetate peels (couldn't wait). A large Cystiphylloides rugose coral.
  6. Polished Horn coral 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polished Horn Coral fossils SITE LOCATION: Western Sahara, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Devonian age (358-416 million years ago) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  7. Polished Horn coral 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polished Horn Coral fossils SITE LOCATION: Western Sahara, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Devonian age (358-416 million years ago) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  8. Horn Coral Group.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Horn Coral SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  9. PDF request

    Would anyone happen to have a pdf of the paper found below please... Zaphrentis and the Zaphrentidae (Devonian; anthozoa, rugosa) by: W.A. Oliver Jr. Bulletins of American Paleontology Issue: 372-373 page: 5 - 24
  10. Rugosa Coral?

    Hello again just wanting to confirm that this is a rugosa coral that I found in northeast missouri. Thanks.
  11. Hi all. This is my first post to the ID forum. I'm stumped on this one. It was found near Kingston, NY. Comes from Middle Devonian Hamilton Group (probably Marcellus Fm). Matrix is a brownish-gray shale. It's a mold of something with small branching (or budding) tubes, dense transverse rings, terminating in cone-shaped depressions. My first guess is some form of branching rugose (horn) coral, where each terminal cone is a corallite. But I wonder if it might also be a sponge -- though sponges usually don't preserve like this, right? In the pictures below, the scale bar has divisions of 1 cm, and in the last photo there is a penny in the background for scale. Thanks for any ideas... Bob
  12. Hi all, a new listing just went up for a pair of Siamosaurus teeth. Siamosaurus teeth are extremely rare. I might be tempted, if not for the fact they are misidentified fossil corals, possibly Rugosa family. You can tell by the vertical lines running down the body, the lack of the distinct theropod teeth shape, the huge size of the fossils, and the poor provenance data (they are identified as Miocene). I have messaged the seller about this mistake. Take care to warn anyone you know who's looking for rare dinosaur teeth.
  13. Carboniferous coral ecology

    This one is from palcubed,2009,and ONLY contains B&W pix I like it wilsonrugoscoralecologyencrustpal3.pdf
  14. A few bits to move on. What do you have? I like ammonites but am open to ideas
  15. Rugose Coral, Solitary, oblique view

    From the album Carboniferous Fossils from Lawrence County, Missouri

    Burlington-Keokuk Formation Osagean Series, Lower Viséan (presumed) Lawrence County near Greene County border, Missouri, USA
  16. Rugose Coral, Solitary, lateral view

    From the album Carboniferous Fossils from Lawrence County, Missouri

    Burlington-Keokuk Formation Osagean Series, Lower Viséan (presumed) Lawrence County near Greene County border, Missouri, USA
  17. Rugose Coral, Solitary, apical view

    From the album Carboniferous Fossils from Lawrence County, Missouri

    Burlington-Keokuk Formation Osagean Series, Lower Viséan (presumed) Lawrence County near Greene County border, Missouri, USA
  18. Rugosa?

    I broke this out of a very hard chunk of Osagean limestone from Lawrence County, MO. The top disintegrated, unfortunately. There was a hole in the rock about the size of a penny, which allowed my daughter to spot the fossil. But that meant it wasn't protected from weathering, and as a result parts of the top were the consistency of rust when we found it. It appeared that the septa originally converged to a nice point. Is this rugosa? And if so, what type?
  19. Rugosa Coral

    I have been told that this is a piece of rugosa coral. It was found about 5 miles from the Tennessee River, near Scottsboro, Alabama. What do you think? It was found on a gravel road with similar colored rocks, etc. about 50 years ago. Age? Era?
  20. Rugosa

    Actinocyathus(Lonsdaleia)floriformis. Moscow basin ,Novogurovsky stone quarry,Serpukhovian Stage,Tarusian Substage. Petalaxis stylaxis. Moscow basin,Moscovian Stage,Podolskian Substage.
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