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Found 34 results

  1. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  2. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  3. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  8. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  10. Coral ID help

    Looking for help on some fossils found today in Somerset County! In what appears to be Limestone. Photo #1, 2 and 3 are the same rock - A rugose coral (see internal structure.) One member thought Lithostrotion . #4 - At the bottom, looks like a tabulate coral? #5 - Coral?
  11. ADAM's SILURIAN

    Hoooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrraaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Here we are at last, into Adam's Silurian. Thanks for looking. First up is the Lower Silurian or Llandovery and I begin with a problem. I posted this one incorrectly in Adam's Ordovician as it had got it's label muddled up with an Ordovician Favosites I had that has vanished in the move here, but is being replaced by kind forum member @Herb Anyway, this, I remember now I've found the correct label, is from the greenish Browgill Formation, part of the Stockdale Group from a cutting near Skelgill (Skelghyll) in Cumbria, Northern England. It seems to be a tabulate coral, but I can't find any listed for this location, only mentions of small, rare, rugose corals. It has the star shaped corallites of a Heliolitidid, but seems to be tightly packed together like a Favositidid. A couple of species of Palaeofavosites seem to be close and are a bit star-shaped,, but anyone know any better? @TqB@piranha hmm who else? The coral bit, an external mold, is a maximum of 3.5 cm across and each corallite up to 2 mm.
  12. Hungry Hollow epibiont help

    Hello everyone! This past Saturday, Viola and I braved the cold to do some fossil collecting in the south pit of Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario (Mid-Devonian). When I got home and washed up my specimens, I saw something interesting on one of the horn corals - I think it's a brachiopod - am I right? And does anyone know its identity? Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  13. Rugose Corals

    I should preface this post by saying that the Paleozoic, marine ecosystems, and invertebrates are not generally my primary expertise, so I apologize if I am wildly off base or asking stupid questions. Sadly, I did not find these specimens myself, and so I do not have any particularly useful information on age or location. They were left in a desk drawer along with a collection of other invertebrate fossils, most (if not all) of which are Paleozoic in age. I have several different rugose coral species, and I would love to know if anyone can refine that identification further. I thought the colonial rugose coral might be an Eridophyllum species, but I would not bet much on my identification. The third is truthfully in terrible condition and I doubt there is much to say about it, but I thought I would see. Here are the pictures. Thank you in advance for your time and input. Specimen #1: Specimen #2: Specimen #3:
  14. Last summer my wife and I took a side trip on our way to Mackinac Island to hunt for Petoskey stones along the shores of Lake Michigan at Little Traverse Bay.Petoskey stones are a fossilized rugose coral, Hexagonaria percarinata, found in the Gravel Point Formation of the Traverse Group from the Devonian era.Glaciers deposited chunks of this coral that were subsequently rounded by wave action. When dry, the stone resembles ordinary limestone but when wet or polished using lapidary techniques, the distinctive mottled pattern of the six-sided coral fossils emerges. I hand polished this piece and had it set in a pendant by a local jeweler. Another form of fossilized corals are also found in the same location,Charlevoix stones.Charlevoix stones are Favosites an extinct kind of tabulate coral. While hunting for Petoskey stones I found this Actinostroma. Apparently these stromatoporoids are common but I thought that this one was a well preserved specimen.
  15. Although this is the same thin section of Rugose Coral posted earlier, they are substantially different in what has been revealed with further polishing. The original thin section was approx. 80microns thin. The additional polishing with 1200 and 2000 grit diamond disks has proved to reveal additional and unexpected detail at a thickness of 35 microns. The new slide photos were taken with a Canon 100D on a Zeiss 305edu microscope. Slide 1 is the cross section as previously posted. Hints of what lay hidden are visible, but the slide is too thick to see detail. Slide 2 is the thin section after another hour of polishing. There are some disc lines in the slide, but I was at the limit of my set up and feared polishing the specimen to oblivion. Slide 3 is viewed through a Dark Field stop. Slide 4 is a close look at the centre of the coral.
  16. Flabellum mortoni 1

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The coral is flattened and not curved. These are pretty abundant. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  17. Flabellum mortoni 2

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The coral is flattened and not curved. These are pretty abundant. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  18. Flabellum mortoni 3

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The coral is flattened and not curved. These are pretty abundant. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  19. Balanophyllia inauris 1

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  20. Balanophyllia inauris 2

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  21. Balanophyllia inauris 3

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    II am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  22. Balanophyllia inauris 3b

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  23. Possible Balanophyllia inauris 2

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    These are the only two specimens of this form in my collection. I highly question the identification but I can't find anything similar in the literature. Perhaps these aren't even rugose corals. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  24. Possible Balanophyllia inauris 1

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    These are the only two specimens of this form in my collection. I highly question the identification but I can't find anything similar in the literature. Perhaps these aren't even rugose corals. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  25. Balanophyllia inauris 6

    From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
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