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Found 21 results

  1. Last summer my wife and I took a side trip on our way to Mackinac Island to hunt for Petoskey stones along the shores of Lake Michigan at Little Traverse Bay.Petoskey stones are a fossilized rugose coral, Hexagonaria percarinata, found in the Gravel Point Formation of the Traverse Group from the Devonian era.Glaciers deposited chunks of this coral that were subsequently rounded by wave action. When dry, the stone resembles ordinary limestone but when wet or polished using lapidary techniques, the distinctive mottled pattern of the six-sided coral fossils emerges. I hand polished this piece and had it set in a pendant by a local jeweler. Another form of fossilized corals are also found in the same location,Charlevoix stones.Charlevoix stones are Favosites an extinct kind of tabulate coral. While hunting for Petoskey stones I found this Actinostroma. Apparently these stromatoporoids are common but I thought that this one was a well preserved specimen.
  2. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  3. Although this is the same thin section of Rugose Coral posted earlier, they are substantially different in what has been revealed with further polishing. The original thin section was approx. 80microns thin. The additional polishing with 1200 and 2000 grit diamond disks has proved to reveal additional and unexpected detail at a thickness of 35 microns. The new slide photos were taken with a Canon 100D on a Zeiss 305edu microscope. Slide 1 is the cross section as previously posted. Hints of what lay hidden are visible, but the slide is too thick to see detail. Slide 2 is the thin section after another hour of polishing. There are some disc lines in the slide, but I was at the limit of my set up and feared polishing the specimen to oblivion. Slide 3 is viewed through a Dark Field stop. Slide 4 is a close look at the centre of the coral.
  4. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The coral is flattened and not curved. These are pretty abundant. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  5. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The coral is flattened and not curved. These are pretty abundant. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  6. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The coral is flattened and not curved. These are pretty abundant. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  7. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  8. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    II am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  9. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  10. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    These are the only two specimens of this form in my collection. I highly question the identification but I can't find anything similar in the literature. Perhaps these aren't even rugose corals. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  11. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    These are the only two specimens of this form in my collection. I highly question the identification but I can't find anything similar in the literature. Perhaps these aren't even rugose corals. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  12. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    I am pretty confident in this identification. The curve is in the plane of the longer axis which is supposedly diagnostic. These are cited as the most common coral in the Manasquan Formation. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  13. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    These are doubtfully T conoides. They do have a curve in the plane of the smaller axis which is supposedly diagnostic. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  14. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    These are doubtfully T conoides. They do have a curve in the plane of the smaller axis which is supposedly diagnostic. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  15. From the album Eocene Corals of NJ

    These are doubtfully T conoides. They do have a curve in the plane of the smaller axis which is supposedly diagnostic. Found in Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  16. Thin sections made from Rugose Coral sent to me by forum member CanadaWest.. There are seven corals in this collection. The thin sections were photographed using a polarizing microscope or a stereo microscope with a simple polarizing kit. I was not successful in making good thin section from all of the specimens so some photos are not the best possible. This post is in four parts. Part 1 Coral 2 Rugose Coral, Carboniferous, Livingston form., Invemere, BC Photo 2 - The initial polishing of a transverse section did not look promising, but a detail (Photo 3) looked interesting Photo 4 is the same transverse section with further polishing and photographed with a stereo microscope with the Darkfield stop in place. Photo 5 is a detail at 15x magnification with crossed polars only. The Rugose Corals are also presented as web slide shows.
  17. A thin section view of a Rugose Coral Dibunophyllum from the Carboniferous time, Sappington Formation, Montana Photo 1 the rugose coral Dibunophyllum Photo 2 the end from which the cross section was cut. Photo 3 a full scan of the thin section at 2.5x Photos 4 to 6 show cropped views of the thin section at 5x and 10x. HTML version
  18. The microscope thin section photos are of a Rugose coral, Heliophyllum is an extinct genus of coral that existed predominantly in the Devonian period. This specimen came from Mejdovb, Morocco. The coral is from a group of Rugose corals sent to me by forum member CanadaWest.. The thin section slices of the coral clearly show where the softer parts of the coral were replaced by minerals. The specimen. Cross section and transverse slices. Selected area cross section details Selected area transverse section details.
  19. From the album Ordovician

    Rugose coral Middle Ordovician Amsterdam Formation Rock City Falls Saratoga CO., NY
  20. Nothing but rain and more rain here for the longest time. Stumbled on this rock in a pile of landscaping stones. I've found small bits of this but not with segmented cylinder/cone stems. Also bryozoa? The gaps are filled with quartz I believe. These pics are just one side. All but one is covered in stems and bryozoa? Thanks for looking.