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Found 27 results

  1. Rugose or Tabulate Coral Colony?

    I believe this to be a coral colony. I'm leaning more towards a rugose colony, but am not positive as most of my experience has been with solitary horn (rugose) corals. Maybe its a larger species of tabulate? Or maybe I'm just over analyzing... I tend to do that. The whole specimen is roughly 4 inches x 4 inches(10cmx10cm) with it narrowing at the bottom to 3 inches (7.6cm) or so. I don't know the age as it was a gift, but I believe it is from the area (Central Kentucky, U.S.A). The individual specimens have flattened sides which makes me think of tabulate coral with its hexagonal shape, but that could be deformity. Then again, I think I can also see septum (circled in red). That may be pareidolia though. Any input would be appreciated!
  2. Just a short video of a quick trip to the beach last week to enjoy the spring sunshine!
  3. Rugose Coral

    All, I went fossil hunting at a new site a little north of downtown Nashville and hit paydirt with these large pieces of rock; they are absolutely packed full of rugose coral
  4. Rugose coral??

    Hello: My father in law had these specimens in a drawer and we were trying to identify. He worked all over the country so there is not telling about the location. My internet sleuthing says rugose coral? Thanks for any input.
  5. First I will say that the number and size of the photos makes it so that uploading directly to the forum more of a job than I'm ready for at this time. Actually I had to divide the prep photos into two different links because there were too many to upload on one album. Secondly and more importantly big thank you to @piranha for linking me to the identification of my rugose coral. From the PDF linked I have came to the conclusion that the rugose coral is a Zaphrentis cliffordana. It's truly the only real match of the corals listed. Now the prep. I started with a Dremel engraver with a very small tip (I forgot the size I've had it for years). I took matrix away and away and away. After several hours I started to hit it lightly with a metal pick (think of a straight dental pick). I also took the Dremel engraver and started to work away my prep channels/lines as best I could making the stone around the coral smooth to the touch. Doing this also allowed for some of the natural stone and other fossils in the matrix to show up. Next comes something I've never tried and maybe others haven't either. I started to scrape, cut, and whittle away at the smooth matrix with a pocket knife (a sharp one) this made it really smooth to the touch and the stone was fairly easy to do this to. Doing this really made the stone and what makes it up stand out (sort of like polishing it without the shine). After all that I hit the fossil with the an air blast to get rid of all the loose dust and matrix. I then gave it a good soak in peroxide and hit it with a nylon brush and a tooth brush. After everything was dry I coated the fossil side of the matrix with a matte finish clear coat. This gives the matrix and fossil a slightly wet appearance making it stand out way more than the normal dry stone. Here is part one of the prep. The first photo was taken after just a few strokes of the Dremel engraver. https://imgur.com/a/KAiPDDW Here is the second part when I started to smooth the matrix around the fossil. https://imgur.com/a/rJHM1ZK Sorry I didn't do step by step photo upload but I'm not that good at editing photos and my phone which I used this round took too large of photos and there were way too many (around 60 photos nearly). I at the very least was hoping to get the before and after photos uploaded but they were too big too.
  6. Fossil help

    I have many types of Rugose coral as shown, but what is commonly in the middle? Calcite, quartz? Rare? Also what type of fossil are the other two?
  7. Can someone please help me out here? I'm new to all of this and my friend is asking me about this fossil he stumbled upon today in Ohio. I've been researching other posts but I'm not 100% on what I'm looking at here. Thank you!
  8. Coral/Worm

    This is from north(sort of)western Maine. The formation is of Emsian age and is related to a marine delta.The horn measures 4cm x 2cm. Horn corals from this quarry are all full of trace fossils. This one is quite different though. Instead of crossing septa it seems to parallel them. It also is more tube like as opposed to the others that are solid rods. Could it have been a worm that lived commensurately with the coral leaving it's waste in the abandon base of the tube ?
  9. Horn Coral

    Hi folks. I cleaned up the horn coral that I posted a pic of earlier. (was wondering if I could find it easily, then realized all I had to do was look for my watch. The missing Timex was much easier to spot. ) Here is pics of it. It is the largest of the many I have found here. Regards,
  10. Penn Dixie Partials

    Hello, all! So I am cleaning out my workshop to make room for a lot of new material coming in and to prepare for the upcoming season. I have wayyyyyy too much Penn Dixie material. I have, at this point, committed all of my complete bugs away. But I still have quite literally, TONS, of other material. What I am offering is Edlredgeops rana partials, this includes entire prepped bugs that are missing cephalons, stand alone cephalons, pygidiums, large but broken cephalons, half bugs, etc. (Please note, I am not offering any of these as complete. There is the real chance that some of the unprepped material COULD be complete, but I am not offering them as such. I also have Greenops pygidiums and partials, beat up examples with broken cephalons, etc. I also have a few Bellacartwrightia pygidiums laying around, and perhaps a few broken and partials of them as well. I also have massive quantities of hash plates from the Bay View coral layer, brachipods (Mucrospirifer, Pseudoatrypa, Rhipidomella, Spinatrypa), Spyroceras cephalopod partials, rugose and tablulate corals, clams, and other random bits. I am interested in trading for similar material from other locales. I am not expecting anyone to offer up prime specimens for any of this material, but I would love anyone else's throw-aways that include vertebrate material, plants, small fish, and the like. I am also considering minerals and gems. (Again, throw-aways are all I'm looking for, quantity beats quality on this one.) I will cover shipping domestically in the US, but can't really afford to ship out a ton of international packages this month. (I will still do international, we just might have to work something out.) If anyone is interested, please message me! I want this stuff gone as quickly as possible, it's getting to the point where I can't walk in my workshop anymore! If you let me know what you're interested in I will take photos of some examples, but it would take me a full weekend at least to photograph everything that I have available. This is perfect for anyone wanting to practice prepping as the Windom shale that most of these bits are in is relatively easy to work and there are lots of attractive pieces that will look very nice prepped, just aren't worth the time and effort for me at this point. Cheers!
  11. Rugose Coral

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Solitary Rugose Coral Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  12. Coral External Mold

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Rugose Coral External Mold Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  13. Rugose Coral

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Rugose Coral Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  14. Geodized Rugose Coral Mold

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Rugose Coral Paleozoic Delaware River, New Castle, Delaware
  15. Rugose Coral Cross-Section

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Rugose Coral Paleozoic Delaware River, New Castle, Delaware
  16. Rugose Coral- top view

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Rugose Coral Paleozoic Bowers Beach, Kent County, Delaware
  17. Rugose Coral

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Rugose Coral Paleozoic Lewes, Delaware
  18. Coral

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Rugose Coral Paleozoic Bowers Beach, Kent County, Delaware
  19. Rugose Coral

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Rugose "Horn" Coral Paleozoic Bowers Beach, Kent County, Delaware
  20. Shore Treasures

    Several years ago, I found a brachiopod and some rugose coral embedded in a couple pebbles while beach combing at Cape Henlopen State Park. I found another few wandering inland at the park. A few years later, I found one at Bowers Beach. This summer I've made it a project to see how much I can find and how far north it goes. My guess is all the way up the river, but I'll stick to DE for now. This week's stop was Battery Park in New Castle. Sure enough, among the chunks of industrial slag and other miscellaneous rubble were several distinct corals. Also found at bowers beach were two pieces of petrified wood. The marine fossils are all from the Paleozoic, but which era I haven't narrowed down yet. The DE Geological Survey doesn't seem to have any published documentation on it. The wood is pleistocene. It was found on Bowers Beach and most likely washed down from a known area of southern New Castle County/Northern Kent County. Next stop: an off-the-beaten-path access point for the Delaware River in Claymont, about as far north as I can get and still be in Delaware!
  21. Confused about coral

    If this is a Tablate coral wouldn't it have "tabulae"? Help, either I'm getting conflicting info or am losing my ability to read. Is there an easy mnemonic device to tell the coral apart?
  22. Possible Rugose Coral?

    Hello everyone. This is my first post. I've had this fossil ever since my father gave it to me as a kid. I know a friend of his gave it to him to give to me so i don't have any information about it other than that. I've always suspected a coral of some sort. This is really the first time i've tried to identify it more clearly. The closest i found on line in pictures were horn coral like caninia torquoia. I tried to get the best pictures i could to post of it with any markings.
  23. Help me ID this "rock"

    I found this many years ago as a child on a beach, either in Florida or North/South Carolina, but I'm not 100% certain. I always assumed it was maybe fossilized poop of some sort, or maybe even fossilized coral. The "rock" is very dense, can scratch almost anything(note glass), and is maybe .5-2lbs. I have dropped it onto concrete from approx. 3-5ft, and it chipped the concrete, and I at least noticed no changes to the "rock". No odor, not even when I originally found it. Non-magnetic. One Side of this "rock" appears to have a crystal-like structure/pattern, but going from the center to the outside. I've included pics: https://i.imgur.com/hmglsiL.jpg https://i.imgur.com/v0KFYv4.jpg https://i.imgur.com/dTiw952.jpg https://i.imgur.com/3QZqrfJ.jpg https://i.imgur.com/iJqIBYM.jpg https://i.imgur.com/SP3ykwU.jpg https://i.imgur.com/UWibNML.jpg https://i.imgur.com/Ory9WDp.jpg Yeah, after about a week of researching I'm thinking(like 85-95% sure) it's a Fossilized(?) Horn Rugose Coral. Looks very much like these pics on this page: http://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/2015/10/09/woosters-fossils-of-the-week-a-rugose-coral-and-its-encrusters-from-the-middle-devonian-of-new-york/ and it also looks very familiar to these/this pic(s): http://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/files/2015/08/3-Wanakah-corals.jpg The one pic I included( https://i.imgur.com/v0KFYv4.jpg) looks like calcite crystals I am also curious how old this item may be, and I think it's app. from the Ordovician to Late Permian era, so maybe 485.4–443.8 million years to 298.9–252.17 million years old. Any help is greatly appreciated, and thanks in advance!
  24. From the album Copenhagen, Louisiana finds

    was informed per forum that this is a Eocene Rugose Coral (Horn Coral) with Predation borings. Found in a creek bed in the Copenhagen, Louisiana community.

    © &copy

  25. Rugose "Horn" Coral

    From the album Mississippian Fossils from Northwest Arkansas

    Rugosa Horn Coral Mississippian Era Bentonville, Ar

    © ssx

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