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Found 39 results

  1. Id help please

    Hi. Kicking around Mt Tzuhalem yesterday and found a few bits that I'm curious about. The first I think is a gastropod cast but it seems to have spines? The second is a small baculite? Thanks in advance.
  2. Hello all Up for trade is this set of South-American teeth. It includes 11 Chilean and 4 Peruvian teeth. The C. chubutensis, Isurus desori and Carcharhinus cf. brachyurus (the last three are on the right side) are from Peru. The others (Megachasma pelagios, C. hastalis, Carcharhinus cf. brachyurus, Isurus retroflexus and a fish tooth labelled as dog fish (not sure if correct) and some unidentified teeth. The C. hastalis is just over 2 inch. The Megachasma pelagios is around 2 cm. The C. chubutensis is just under 2 inch and has a crack in the root, but is broken. More precise location is available with every tooth. I prefer to trade this as a set. Also up for trade are these partial teeth from the Santonian of Israel. Certainly an unusual location. What do I want in return? Squalicorax teeth from unusual locations, any Kem Kem stuff I find cool (teeth, bones, scutes, unknow stuff), reptile, amphibian or dinosaur stuff, Mosasaur teeth from Unusual locations or I'm open for any offer I like Due to Corona I can only ship after the end of the lockdown.
  3. Oncoids - Oncolites

    04/13/2020: End of my lock-down. Visited a locality with oncoids-oncolites in the Santonian - Lower Campanian Geistthal-formation (59) of the Gosau-basin of Kainach. Locality is near Kreuzwirt south of Geistthal and was told to my by a friend, so I will keep it secret. This is a specimen from block 1. Most of block 1 is still there, I removed only about 2 kg (2 specimens) of the about 40 kg heavy block. Only two more blocks of this material were found, despite really good outcrops just nearby (with alternations of conglomerates, sandstones and siltsones). There should be a better locality west of Geistthal, but have not found anything there during previous visits. Last but not least some typical landscape of the Gosau-basin of Kainach. Cherry trees etc. are blooming at the moment, but everything was soooo try. But we finally had some rain during last night! Franz Bernhard
  4. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so small that the photo's are not as sharp as I would have liked, but I think they are good enough. It is Squalicorax primaevus from the Middle Albian Argiles tégulines of Courcelles, Aube Department, France. See you guys tomorrow, Sander
  5. Cupulina

  6. Almost 2 weeks ago I went with a small group from the rockhound club up to the Vancouver Island Paleontology Museum and the Courtenay & District Museum to see their fossils. Weather was too crummy to do an actual collecting field trip at any place! I guess it's OK to post pics here. I won't post anybody's face. The lighting and some of the display cases themselves presented problems for photography at both places, besides which it was kind of a whirlwind tour, so these shots are the best I could do. I'd say the poor lighting was the worst thing about both places, but we're dealing with small museums with small budgets here, so I figure that can be excused. First, Graham Beard gave us an informative tour of the VIPS in Qualicum Beach. It is a one-room fossil display, aimed primarily at educating the public, and Graham's tour was likewise, which suited us fine as most of the rockhounds know next to nothing about fossils. I think we all got more out of it than we would have if we'd been left to view it all on our own. He not only explained what was interesting about many of the pieces but also recounted the stories around how some of them were collected or acquired. He started at the 'types of preservation' showcase, which featured a piece from the Appian Way site up toward Campbell River which contains Eocene plants. It had been sliced and peeled to reveal fine cross-section detail of the plants. Several new species have been described from here. If you look closely at the slab leaning at an angle on the stand you can see a sheet partly peeled off: Heteromorphic ammonites from Hornby Island and V.I.: The big dark one in front, I have a piece of the same taxon from Mt Tzuhalem. Mine is missing the crook part but looks identical to the straight part. I thought it was from my mountain until Graham told me it was from up along the Inland Island Hwy near Courtenay. (Nothing to collect there now, as that was when the hwy was being built or widened). It didn't have a label and Graham couldn't remember so I'm still not sure what it's called!
  7. Pholadomya sp. (Sowerby 1823)

    From the album Gastropods and Bivalves Worldwide

    10cm. long Gosau-Schichten Santonian Late Cretaceous Found in the Randobach above Russbach. Gosau, Salzburgerland, Austria
  8. A recent acquisition that I bought just because it's beautiful. Impressions of cidarids crop up quite often in Cretaceous flint but I've never been lucky enough to find one (and I live in the wrong area). Probably Temnocidaris sp., Upper Cretaceous, Santonian, Kent coast, southern England. Test fragment 13mm across
  9. From the album Gastropods and Bivalves Worldwide

    8cm. long. 3cm. diameter at the mouth with the lid valve intact. Hochmoos Schichten Gosau Schichten Santonian Late Cretaceous Found at Pass Gschutt, Salzburgerland, Austria
  10. Fossil hunting in the Santonian - lower Campanian Geistthal-formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach, Eastern Alps (Styria, Austria) As a whole, the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä is not very fossiliferous. In contrast to the St. Bartholomä-formation with its rudists etc., the other, much more extensive formations, especially the very extensive, somewhat tubititic Afling-formation, are generally very poor in fossils. Some are known, eg. ammonites, but their occurrences are rather elusive. One exception - or at least in part - are Trochactaeon snails. They are known since the beginning of geological documentation of the area (around 1850), but only as loose pieces. It took until about the 1960ies for the first finds of this snails in outcrops. However, only a few sentences were (repeatedly) published since then, only a list of the species is given (without any description), and also no detailed description of the occurrences and their exact locations. That´s the sad side. The good side is: There is at least one (permanent) occurrence of this snails in an outcrop at a major road! This occurrence is at the red X... Part of Geofast-map (left, squares are 2x2 km) and geological overview from Ebner (2000) (right). There seems to be not much correspondence between these maps. For orientation, see village Geistthal in upper part of both maps. ...and it is featured in an excursion guide from 2015 (from Hubmann & Gross, 2015): The snails are located in the upper part of the Geistthal-formation, a succession of gray conglomerates, sandstones and siltstones with very occasional thin coal layers and thin beds of calcareous onkoids. The lower part of the Geistthal-formation is a coarse-grained, red conglomerate; its the basal formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach. I have visited this outcrop in December 2015, and yes, the snails are still there.
  11. Rudist ?

    Hi, a friend of mine told me he found some Placentyceras in a place where the geologic ages go from the Albian to the Turonian-Santonian, but most of the stratas of that place are Cenomanian. I believe this fossil is not an ammonite, but rather an Oyster or a rudist. I mostly think about Requienia or Toucasia. The geologic file mention the name of Toncasia bayleia. Do you know if Toncasia is a synonym of Toucasia and do you think i'm right thinking this is a rudist ? Lenght : 7 centimeters.
  12. I need an ID for this clam. I found this clam in a concretion. it was taken from the Kevin member of the Marias formation. Th Kevin member is listed as Santonian Cretaceous. The location is 5 miles west of Loma Montana.
  13. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis teeth

    Here are two teeth from a fairly recently (2011) described Scapanorhynchus species from the Upper Cretaceous Santonian in New Mexico. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis has a dentition similar to S. lewisii and was likely very similar. My son and I do classroom science presentations about fossils and our shark program features Scapanorhynchus. He used the lewisii as the basis for his illustration and now we can actually provide teeth that are a closer match to that than S. texanus likely was. This also allows him to draw S. texanus in a more Sand Tiger like form which we both think it was. I put quite a bit of research in our programs and we strive for accuracy so I am really digging these teeth !!!
  14. In late February I went to a site in the Middle/Upper Santonian stage of the Bruceville Chalk Marl Formation, Austin Group, in Ellis county, Texas. While at the site I found a few inoceramids, possibly an anaptychus, and a chunk of rock that looks like it could have mollusk grazing traces on it. Then today I was organizing my collection and picked up the rock with the possible grazing traces. While I was handling the rock I happened to look at the bottom of it and spotted a small Squalicorax sp. tooth, my first tooth from the Santonian. It is 11 mm long and is pretty complete, with the left side of the root being exposed. I am not sure about the right side of the root, but it may still be there under the matrix. I have been trying to put it to a species. From looking through Welton and Farish’s book as well as elasmo.com the most likely candidates seem to be the two paleo-buckets S. “falcatus” and S. “kaupi,” and the species S. lindstormi. I am not terribly familiar with fossil shark teeth, so I am very curious what the more informed members of this forum can say about what species this could be. I am also wondering if the first picture could be of mollusk grazing traces. Would it be a good idea to try to prep it out further? And if so, what would a good strategy be with chalky/marly matrix? FIG 1: Possible mollusk grazing traces on the top of the rock. FIG 2. FIG 3.
  15. Micraster decipiens - 6

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Saint-Pierre en Port
  16. Laevicardium sp. (Swainson 1840)

    Shell preservation.
  17. Neithea coquandi (Peron 1877)

    Shell preservation.
  18. Calcified steinkern. 3 different samples, one showing a cross section and another showing the "lid".
  19. Vaccinites sp. (Fischer 1887)

    Shell preservation. 3 different samples, one of which shows a polished cross section.
  20. Nerinea (Parasymploptyxis) buchi

    I've included a longtitudinal section.
  21. Leaves - Vancouver Island Santonian

    This is not a great photo, it was taken after sunset at the site of discovery, and it's a bit dirty. I still need to trim the huge chunk and wash it off, and it now sits in a spot with poor lighting, so this is the best I can do for now, but maybe someone who knows Cretaceous flora can suggest an ID for these leaves based on the general outline? The one on the right especially has 3 clear lobes, and note the stems. Platanus? I have never found this type before, in 9 years of collecting up there.
  22. It's just an impression, but I find so few like this I had to keep it. Looked all over for the positive but could not find it. It seems so long and narrow for a Bostrychoceras, or is that just an aspect of the impression? 5 whorls visible.
  23. I know next to nothing about shark teeth but I take it this is a cow shark? I know some of you are shark tooth fanatics who I hope can narrow down the possibilities for me. I have difficulty getting good pics of this little thing... I could try for some better ones if necessary. The tooth itself is split between both parts of the matrix. Haslam Formation (Nanaimo Group), Cowichan Valley Vancouver Isl. (my usual collecting site, up the mtn.) This is only the 3rd shark tooth I've ever found, only two of which I still have, and the only one from Mt Tzuhalem so far.
  24. Not complete, but nevertheless a good sample.
  25. Mostly Phragmocone.
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