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Found 32 results

  1. Scallop

    From the album Virginia Miocene

    Chesapectin nefrens Westmoland County, VA Choptank Formation Middle Miocene C. nefrens is fairly common in the Choptank Formation, but the level of sculptural detail preserved in this particular specimen just blew me away when I gently brushed off the loose sediment.
  2. Scallop

    From the album Virginia Miocene

    Chesapectin nefrens Westmoland County, VA Choptank Formation Middle Miocene C. nefrens is fairly common in the Choptank Formation, but the level of sculptural detail preserved in this particular specimen just blew me away when I gently brushed off the loose sediment.
  3. First attempt!

    Went to Virginia a few months ago and came home with a few Chesapectin nefrens encased in solid rock. This one was only exposed as a ring of shell material in a ball of clay, calcite, iron ,broken shell and who knows what else. Normally I prep things with soft brushes, dental picks, a water pick, and very gentle fingers. That wasn't cutting it this time and I had to get aggressive. I spent 3+ hours with a rotary tool and zero practice. It's no museum piece, but it's not horrible. I could simply collect the same species, from the same member of the same formation, at a much closer spot, where the matrix is much looser, but I gotta learn sometime. Suggestions for next time?
  4. First attempt!

    Went to Virginia a few months ago and came home with a few Chesapectin nefrens encased in solid rock. This one was only exposed as a ring of shell material in a ball of clay, calcite, iron ,broken shell and who knows what else. Normally I prep things with soft brushes, dental picks, a water pick, and very gentle fingers. That wasn't cutting it this time and I had to get aggressive. I spent 3+ hours with a rotary tool and zero practice. It's no museum piece, but it's not horrible. I could simply collect the same species, from the same member of the same formation, at a much closer spot, where the matrix is much looser, but I gotta learn sometime. Suggestions for next time?
  5. Never identified a fossil before!

    Hello, I am very new to this. I am a bio teacher with no experience in paleontology but I have to teach it! I recently found an intact top and bottom scallop shell off the James River, in Surry county, Virginia. I know it belongs to the Chesapecten genus, but not sure what species it is. Some friends have tried to help but I don’t understand what they are talking about. Possibly found in either the Yorktown formation or Eastover formation. Please help!
  6. Found this amongst some rocks and Agatized Coral at Dunedin Causeway in FL. Can anyone confirm that it's actually a fossil? And not just a modern cement mixer or something?! Pretty sure it is a fossil! Thanks
  7. Monotis?

    Hi there. Found this rock a few months back, assuming for the moment that it's a monotis sp which are pretty common to Triassic marine sediments here in NZ. Any other opinions would be appreciated.
  8. On my recent trip to the Caloosahatchee (while waiting for the Peace River to descend a bit) a friend and I went to our favorite place, as I recounted on my recent A DAY ON THE CALOOSAHATCHEE post under the Trips section of the forum. Besides the things I can identify, I found what I think is a piece of antler, though it doesn't look like a whitetail deer antler to me, so I hope someone might be able to help ID it. I also found a small delicate scallop I was not able to ID . Over the years I found many kinds of scallops, i seem to recall seeing a similar one once in a post identifying Ft Thompson formation scallops, but can't locate that now. Any help in the little scallop would also be appreciated. And finally, we found 1 exceptional Vasum Horridum that i showed under my Trip post. The one posted here, had a few broken points, but still has cleaned up well and doesn't look as shabby as when I first found it. I these Vasum are spectacular, and the complete ones are extraordinary. (OOPS, THE VASUM IMAGES RAN PAST MY ALLOWED SPACE, SO i'LL GO BACK TO MY TRIP POST AND ADD THEM IN THERE)
  9. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  10. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  11. Pleistocene Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus in Pleistocene matrix among the much more recent seas shells lying on the beach at Cape Hatteras
  12. Chesapectin nefrens

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Collected loose on the beach in St. Leonard, Maryland middle Miocene Choptank Formation Drum Cliff Member Chesapectin nefrens is an index fossil for the Drum Cliff Member of the Choptank Formation, meaning that whatever chunk of matrix one may find fallen out of the cliffs, the precise layer is known so that other fossils in the same block can be identified. These are a very common find at St. Leonard and other places, but I particularly liked the coloration on this one!

    © Heather JM Siple 2018

  13. Greetings, TFF crew. I seriously doubt that there's any great mystery to what this fossil is, but since it's my first self-liberated fossil, I decided to post. I'd go out on a limb and say that it's some type of miocene scallop. I was driving through a local canyon, not far from the now forbidden zone in Old Topanga, when I spotted a decent sized piece of sandstone between the road and the crumbling hillside. I had my GF go out and grab it while I kept it safe with other cars. We could see what looked like the wavy edges of a scallop at the outside of the sandstone. There are still a few more in evidence. I was fairly careful, but perhaps not careful enough in retrospect, and didn't have a thin "liberating" tool, so I used the only cold-chisel I have. I tapped around, maybe 4mm from the subject's edge, and it split. I then used a little pick to clean out most of the sandstone. Unfortunately, some fossil material came off with a piece of the shell, but it's mostly intact. Surely I could have done a bit better, and will the next time. I'm still rather jazzed to have my first stone produce some "color". There's also a little dark piece that caught my eye. It's probably 10mm in length. It's probably some sort of quartz fragment, but then again maybe it's some sort of coprolite. Poop springs eternal, right? (Sorry) Cheers all.
  14. estero scallop, pleistocene, id?

    I came across this beautiful scallop, and unfortunately it was tightly bonded to a piece of limestone ( I only had my fingers to chip it out, and that wouldn't have worked, couldn't even dig at the hard clay) but it was so beautiful with all the little spines. when I tried to i.d. it from the Florida Paleontology site, I could only come up with Antillipecten antillarum...is that a good guess, or does someone have a better one. Perhaps someone recognizes it instantly. I found it on a construction site near Estero FL, which means it is probably pleistocene. Thanks.
  15. For awhile now, I have been trying to pin down this scallop. I think it is an argopecten, possibly comparilis, or evergladesensis, but the images I can find on line of those, seem to show ribs that are rounded on top. These shells have very flat ribs, with a very slight indentation running down the center of each. The shells are offset a bit. I found them in the northern most edge of ochopee member of the Tamiami formation, along with euvola hemicyclica, and a really lovely little urchin test, the exact name of which I don't recall as I sit here typing. I have a collection of 30 different sizes I am trying to put together in a ryker box, but have not yet done so, because I just don't know the id...a friend suggested I check out dimarzipecten crocus....but that kind of obscure reference is wa-a-ay beyond me. I'd rather put to use someone's knowledge, if you know what it is, would you please take a moment and explain Why you i.d. it as you do. Much appreciated.
  16. Big scallop from France

    Hi all, So I just purchased this nice huge scallop for a killer price. Though not complete, i still love it. Its from the quarry of Lacoste, in Vaucluse, Southern France. From the Miocene. Well, it was sold to me as Chlamys latissima, but in some of my books it mentions Chlamys gigantea instead. So I was wondering, what species is it? Oh, also, does anyone know more precisely how old the scallop is, and what formation it is from? Thanks in advance! Max
  17. World Of Fossils Logo

    Hi all, Just wanted to share with you the new logo I recently finished for my World Of Fossils website (I said previously that I would try to get it done by the end of 2017... But it's gonna take longer than that, because I basically have to restart. At first I was using Weebly, a simple drag-and-drop, but I decided to actually move on to my own domain and program everything using HTML, CSS and others. I'm lucky that my ICT teacher is helping me. So it's gonna take quite some time still before the website is finished I'm afraid.) Anyways, so here is the logo. I watermarked it for copyright safety issues (as it's going publicly online, I'm scared that someone might steal the logo and claim it as their own). So, some info about it: the programs I used were Inkscape and Paint.net. The globe in the middle is a reconstruction of Pangea. The three fossils are, from left to right: a trilobite Gerastos tuberculensis from Morocco (bought), a cowshark tooth Notorhynchus cepedianus from Calvert Cliffs (traded), and a scallop Mimachlamys varia from the Zandmotor (found). All fossils from my collection. The drawings are made from actual pictures of the fossils. I quite like it, let me know what you think of it! Best regards, Max
  18. Bivalve "scallop" Peru

    Hi I recently obtained this specimen at a street market in Peru. Its 5cm x 4cm. Looks scallop or oyster like. Any ideas on id and age? Regards Dennis
  19. Scallop

    Found on the beach near Matoaka Beach cabins. This specimen has several pearl buds, including some that developed around predation holes.
  20. Scallop

    Chesapectin nefrens is an index fossil for the Drum Cliff Member of the Choptank Formation. This example is particularly nice because the interior is almost completely layered in pearl.
  21. Scallop

    This is an index fossil for the Drumcliffs Member of the Choptank Formation. Donated to the Delaware Museum of Natural History
  22. A great mailbox find

    Today I had a great surprise in my mailbox: some beautiful Nodipecten collierensis scallops, from Florida!!! Many of you know how much I love fossil seashells, so obviously I was eagerly awaiting these. Thank you so much to Rod @dalmayshun, from whom I got those little beauties as a gift! Max
  23. Scallop: fossil or not?

    Hi all, I found this partial scallop yesterday. I found it on the Acrocorinth, in Corinth (Greece). I'm not really looking after the species, even though obviously if someone can tell it it would be great. I'm more looking to see whether it is fossil or not. Here are my pro/con arguments: Pro: • thick and heavy • found at about 400m altitude • I had to dig it out of the dirt Con: • very colorful • shiny • no references of fossils being found here Anyone know if it is fossil or not? Thanks, Max Here are some more pics of it, when wet: And I also found this nearby. Looks like coral/bryozoan or something like that (I'm really not sure: this could easily be a concretion):
  24. A scallop: Mimachlamys varia

    From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A nice complete scallop from the Zandmotor, of good size too.
  25. Chesapecten

    A small specimen of this species, but a nice one. They get quite a bit larger. I have one pushing 160 mm wide but it is in poor shape.
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