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Found 14 results

  1. Cretolamnid?

    Back again for more information. These teeth are driving me nuts. I am working on a Coniacian deposit from north central New Mexico, and have gotten around 20,000 fossils from sifting and screen washing ant hills. The vast majority are scapanorhynchids (over 12,000), but there are at least 25 other species represented. These teeth come from a possible barrier island deposit, and the wave action prior to fossilization must have been intense, since almost all the teeth are missing roots. There are around 1500 teeth that look like scapanorhyncus cf. raphiodon, but they have no striations. I was informed by Shawn Hamm that these probably are scapanorhynchids that simply have the striations worn off, something he has seen in the Atco formation in Texas. However, there are around 1500 other teeth that were identified as Cretolamna by Bruce Welton (who personally viewed the collection), but this is disputed by Shawn Hamm, who thinks they are either scapanorhynchus or possibly dallasiella (although I am not aware that this genus has been recorded in New Mexico). Anyone out there want to venture an opinion? I will be put two more photos on another post. Randy
  2. Here is a video I made, measuring the cusp of a Scapanorhynchus fossil shark tooth from Frankstown, MS. I used the technique suggested by a previous post regarding the measurement of the tooth cusp of "Carcharocles, Carcharodon and Isurus using anterior teeth." Does the technique and measurement I performed appear legitimate? fossil shark tooth | measuring in inches in centimeters
  3. Dipped S. texanus

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Neat coloration on another S. texanus tooth. Collected 7/18/19.
  4. Scapanorhynchus texanus

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    S. texanus teeth from POC. Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 7/18/19.
  5. Fiery Scapanorhynchus texanus

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    The teeth found in POC can take on a reddish and/or orange color. This goblin shark tooth was quite colorful! Collected 6/21/19.
  6. Can you find the shark tooth? (4)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of S. texanus. Collected 6/21/19.
  7. Can you find the shark tooth? (2)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of S. texanus. Collected 6/21/19.
  8. Can you find the shark tooth (1)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of S. texanus. Collected 6/21/19.
  9. Scapanorhynchus texanus

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Teeth of S. texanus. Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 6/21/19.
  10. After the Hybodontids, our program starts to transition toward the modern sharks. We introduce lamniform sharks and the cow sharks. We will not be able to spend much time at all on the Cow and Crow Sharks. They only get a brief introduction and a look at the teeth. Squalicorax is an important species for us even though we do not spend a lot of time on it. The students in first few classes we do presentations for will be going home with Squalicorax teeth from Morocco. We would like to spend more time on the Cow sharks eventually but we only have one tooth to show them and we will have to edit content to free up space for them but I will work on that down the road. The primary focus in this section is Scapanorhynchus. The first shark art Carter did was a Goblin and we do give them a lot of time in the presentaton. They look cool and have been around for a long time. We present the kids with a nice assortment of teeth and some cool science. The teeth were important adaptations for catching fish and the snout had the ampullae of Lorenzini for sensing changes in the electro magnetic fields around them. We compare this to the modern hammerhead which we do not cover in the program but gives the kids a sense of how the adaptations of hammerheads work. We also talk about fin structure and being able to tell they were slow swimmers. The extend-o-matic jaw is another adaptation we cover with this species. I am happy with the fossil representations for now though I really want to add more Cow Shark fossils at some point and Anomotodon would also be a good addition. The fossils for the presentation.. Pic 1 Hexanchus andersoni from STH. I know H. andersoni should chronologically fit later but Cow Sharks fit here and this is the only one we have for now. Pic 2- Squalicorax pristodontus from Morocco. This is our largest Squalicorax tooth. The kids will get these teeth to take home so while we do not spend a lot of time on them, the teeth are very important to the program. Pic 3- Scapnorhynchus texanus and Scapanorhynchus puercoensis. Our nice little Goblin Shark display with some of our best teeth. Two of the texanus teeth are over 1.5 inches and the puercoenisis teeth are uncommon I believe and pretty super cool.
  11. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis teeth

    Here are two teeth from a fairly recently (2011) described Scapanorhynchus species from the Upper Cretaceous Santonian in New Mexico. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis has a dentition similar to S. lewisii and was likely very similar. My son and I do classroom science presentations about fossils and our shark program features Scapanorhynchus. He used the lewisii as the basis for his illustration and now we can actually provide teeth that are a closer match to that than S. texanus likely was. This also allows him to draw S. texanus in a more Sand Tiger like form which we both think it was. I put quite a bit of research in our programs and we strive for accuracy so I am really digging these teeth !!!
  12. I found this tooth and got SO EXCITED! I am still learning and starting this hobby, but very fast becoming addicted! So far all I wanted to find was a shark tooth and after finding two Ptychodus whipplei teeth, I saw this! I am thinking Scapanorhynchus. Found in North Dallas with other Cretaceous fossils.
  13. Some finds from a few recent trips to a couple different spots.
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