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Found 39 results

  1. Fossilized cretaceous sea worm?

    Found small sea urchin next to the ammonite in Lake Texoma Duck creek formation over the weekend. While I was cleaning the sea urchin, I noticed something that caught my eyes. It appears to be a small worm that lived in Cretaceous sea, gotten attached to the sea urchin and fossilized at the same time. Anybody familiar with sea worms like this?
  2. Echinoids

    The first 8 are echinoids and echinoid spines, I have seen plenty of photos of them while researching forams. Doctor Mud.....I can not confirm it but I do think you may be right about the last two being some sort of echinoid, This thing is only about a half a millimeter in size, I can't find anything online that looks like it but will keep at it.
  3. Please help identify some Big Brook finds!

    I took a trip to Big Brook in Monmouth County, NJ yesterday and found some things that I need help identifying. Any help would be appreciated! Pic #1: Possibly sea urchin spines?
  4. My sea urchin build I've had the stuff for a while and decided to start assembling the little bugger.
  5. What is this fossil?

    Hello, I was shell hunting today on Holden Beach and found, what I believe, is a fossil. It appears to be some type of sea biscuit(based on photos I’ve found online). It is very hard and filled with some type of compacted sediment. Any ideas what it might be and how old it is?
  6. Diplodetus Echinoid

  7. I decided on a whim to go fossil hunting yesterday. I took off on the 2 hr drive to get to my favorite area the North Sulphur River Texas. I jumped off in three creeks to see footprints everywhere. I decided to go try a creek I spotted a few years ago but never tried. It paid off. I found my first NSR echinoid after 4yrs of heavy hunting. Echinoids are quite rare at NSR. I also found a really cool Pachydiscus ammonite with an Inoceramid on it. I think I"ll try that creek again in the future.
  8. This is another piece discovered at an estate sale, which of course means I do not have the info such as location it was found, etc. It has some amazing detail, spiny legs? but it's so squished into the matrix I have no idea what it could be. Hope to receive more info. The piece is approx. 6 x 4"
  9. Texas fossil hunt trip

    I and my 8 years old boy a great time fossil hunt in Texas. During our time in Austin, with Erose help, we hunt at Texas 360 and found a nice sea urchin, some devil toe snail (oyster,) and shells. It was raining so I didn't spend much time there. After Christmas, we start our fossil hunt trip. We stop at Meridian road cut for some heart sea urchin, coral, and shells. Then drove to Mineral Wells Fossil Park. My son love this place so much because the fossils are so easy to find and he love crinoids. We didn't find any shark teeth or trilobite but we are happy. My son want to assembly the crinoid pieces to make full crinoids then we decide to put everything we found at Mineral Wells Fossil Park to make Pennsylvanian period ocean floor. We stayed at Fort Worth for the night. The next morning, me and my son visited the 2 sites KimTexan gave us (thanks Kim.) I went to the first site, parked the car at the day care (read Kim post carefully) and crossed the street. We walked for about 15 minutes and couldn't find anything except for this, please help me identify this fossil if they are actually fossil. It was so cool and my son want to get back to the car. On the way back, we found the first echinoid. I walked my son to the car and came back for more echinoids. I walked around another 10 minutes without any echinoid but I realized the white rocks I steps on are fragment of ammonites. I decided to search for a complete ammonites or at least a good fragment. And I found this. This is what it look like after I remove some matrix I found 2 more echinoids and got back to the car to go to the second site. The second site has a lot more fossils and is very easy to find. I found many echinoids which are all less than 1 inch, a complete ammonites, and 3 pieces of fossils which I don't know what they are. I found this ammonites in the clay. Since I have no tool with me, I walked back to my car to get a garden shavel (the only thing I have) and a bottle of water. i pulled the water to the clay to make it easy to extract the fossil. Here is what it look like after I clean it up We went back to the hotel to pick up my daughter and husband, checked out and drove to Dallas for lunch then to Waco to visit Waco Mammoth National Monument and back to Austin. We had a great time hunting and so happy with the fossils we got.
  10. Sea Urchin

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Boletechinus sp. Late Cretaceous Mount Laurel Formation C and D Canal, Reedy Point North Delaware City, Delaware, USA
  11. Sea Urchin

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Hemiaster delawarensis Late Cretaceous Mount Laurel Formation C and D Canal, Reedy Point North Delaware City, Delaware, USA
  12. echinoid morphology

    BeadleCLASSIndispensablechinoi-1995-Evolution.pdf Steven C.Beadle Retrodisplacement of the oral and anal openings of dendrasterid sand dollars Evolution,49(6),1995,pp 1203-1214 edit: apologies/size,1,3 Mb approximately second edit:"1005" changed to "1995"
  13. I'm looking for as many as possible urchin spines all sizes to reconstruct an urchin. I would also like matrix to mount it on preferable from the same area as the spines. I can trade fossils from Washington a prepared crab or unprepared either of your choosing.
  14. Sea urchin non det.

    From the album Invertebrates

    Sea urchin non det. Middle Triassic Crailsheim Germany Diameter 7cm
  15. Hello everyone, For this first report I take you to visit a small site in the Hauterivien. A few kilometers from the village of Hauterive which gave it its name. (Sorry for the quality of the photos I was with my nephew aged 14. And the rain made us go home prematurely) In this region the Hauterivien is composed in its upper part of a yellow limestone called "Pierre jaune de Neuchâtel". (It has served a lot in the construction.) Below is layers of marl called "Marnes d'Hauterive". These are the layers we are going to explore. Some views of the career: In this photo, we can see the succession of layers: Snow and water did their job of clearing during the winter: Much of the site is still subject to winter landslides. We will avoid setting foot there. The wall is still unstable. A sample of the finds of the day: Lamellaerynchia, Musclina and Plicarostrum make up most of the brachiopod fauna of the quarry. I still managed to get my hands on a much less common Belothyris. And on this copy that I have not yet identified. I have not found anything comparable on this site yet. Some sea urchins that can be found on the site: The inevitable and very common Toxaster retusus: Holaster Intermedius: Pseudodiadema rotulare: That's all for this ride.
  16. Magnosia nodulosa

    From the album Fossils from Switzerland

    A beautiful but small (0.4 cm long) Magnosia nodulosa from the quarry Schümel near Holderbank (Switzerland). In the "Birmenstorf-Member" small sea urchins arent that rare but also not comon.
  17. Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA Morocco Middle Jurassic (about 170 Million Years Ago) Phymosoma is an extinct genus of echinoids that lived from the Cretaceous to the Eocene. Sea Urchins are a group of marine invertebrates that today can be found in almost every major marine habitat from the poles to the equator and from the intertidal zone to depths of more than 5,000 metres. There are around 800 extant species and the group has a long and detailed fossil record stretching back about 450 million years ago to the Late Ordovician Period. Commonly called "Sea Biscuits" of Sea Urchins Echinoid is Latin for "pickle". When alive these animals were covered with movable spines which gave protection and provided locomotion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Phymosomatoida Family: Phymosomatidae Genus: Phymosoma
  18. Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA Morocco Middle Jurassic (about 170 Million Years Ago) Phymosoma is an extinct genus of echinoids that lived from the Cretaceous to the Eocene. Sea Urchins are a group of marine invertebrates that today can be found in almost every major marine habitat from the poles to the equator and from the intertidal zone to depths of more than 5,000 metres. There are around 800 extant species and the group has a long and detailed fossil record stretching back about 450 million years ago to the Late Ordovician Period. Commonly called "Sea Biscuits" of Sea Urchins Echinoid is Latin for "pickle". When alive these animals were covered with movable spines which gave protection and provided locomotion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Phymosomatoida Family: Phymosomatidae Genus: Phymosoma
  19. Sea Urchin Fossil - Madagascar a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - Mepygurus depressus Madagascar Callovian stage of the Jurassic Era circa 144 to 208 million years ago This type of Sea Urchin, "Mepygurus depressus", like a (sand dollar), is an extremely flat form of echinoid. They are a slow moving creature, feeding primarily upon algae, as they burrow through the soft sand in our oceans. Sea Urchins have a rigid skeletal system, known as a test, which is comprised of several interlocking plates. On the top of their bodies are five visually paired rows of perforations of their endoskeleton, which are formed in a perfect star shaped pattern. These perforations act as a gas exchange system for the Sea Urchin. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Cassiduloida Family: Clypeidae Genus: Mepygurus Species: depressus
  20. Sea Urchin Fossil - Madagascar a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - Mepygurus depressus Madagascar Callovian stage of the Jurassic Era circa 144 to 208 million years ago This type of Sea Urchin, "Mepygurus depressus", like a (sand dollar), is an extremely flat form of echinoid. They are a slow moving creature, feeding primarily upon algae, as they burrow through the soft sand in our oceans. Sea Urchins have a rigid skeletal system, known as a test, which is comprised of several interlocking plates. On the top of their bodies are five visually paired rows of perforations of their endoskeleton, which are formed in a perfect star shaped pattern. These perforations act as a gas exchange system for the Sea Urchin. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Cassiduloida Family: Clypeidae Genus: Mepygurus Species: depressus
  21. Sea Urchin Fossil?

    Hello there all! I have not been able to do much fossiling over the last few months as I have been busy with this and that, however in the last week I was able to take a couple of trips up to Mathesons Bay. The bay is situated in Leigh, north of Auckland and belongs to the Cape Rodney formation. The fossil bearing rocks in the bay are early Miocene, between 22 and 20 million years old (Otaian in New Zealand's geological scale). The specimen I'm wondering about was found in coarse sandstone, along with some quite nice little brachiopods ( in fact there is a piece of brachiopod attached to it). It is only a fragment but the piece has rows of knobs ranging from 2mm to 0.5mm in diameter running along its curved surface. There does not seem to be a clear pattern in regards the size of the knobs in each row, which leaves me wondering if it is a echinoid or not. However, it is possible the the variability in the knob's size is down to weathering, as the specimen is quite worn.. As far as I have read, the only echinoid known from the locality is Phyllacanthus titan, with that known from its fossilised spines alone (a few fragments of which I found, one quite near the specimen in question). I am wondering if this piece is from Phyllacanthus titan, or some other type of sea urchin. Thanks a lot! Here are a couple more pictures, the specimen is rather worn and a little difficult to make out I am afraid..
  22. Apex?Que?

    When three guys with that kind of reputation in echinodermology get together to write a paper,you just KNOW it's going to be good. Highly recommended,particularly if you love your Loven,Mortensen,Raff,etc. Extremely well illustrated,IMHO Saucepourtpical 04 me.pdf
  23. Preparing a sea urchin

    Hi all, First off, I am a real noob when it comes to prepping fossils... This is why I have a question for you, which I don't think would be too hard for you pros out there. Some of you may have seen this sea urchin before; anyways I wanted to prep it, as I believe it will look quite nice after a good prep. There is just one problem though: the matrix is very hard (compared to what I'm used to). So how should I clear all this matrix? The tools I have are very limited, but I can buy new things (as long as they are very cheap materials). I have: one long thin metal needle, one strong pointed needle, one strong small chisel, and one thing to blow the matrix away (sorry if I don't have the correct terms)... If needed I can post a picture of the tools. Here is a picture of the fossil:
  24. My newest find

    Last Friday i visited some quarries near Gundelfingen (Danube). In the Upper Marine Molasse (do i say this right?) i found some beautiful oysters but i also was in a quarry where you can find fossils from the white jurassic. There i found some bivalves, brachiopods and this ... A sea urchin with a length of 1cm I know that many of you have lots of sea urchins but for me its a nice find ! Firstly they are rare here in my area and that is only my second sea urchin, which i found in my life Shadefully the urchin is damaged but can somebody determine this one? Another picture: Please dont make fun of this shabby specimen Thanks for your interest !
  25. Sea Urchin-Cuba

    Is this a common sea urchin. Found in cuba. My friend says they are a different than what is found in florida.
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