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Found 16 results

  1. Psuedocorax

    Hey all, I am once again coming to you, as this board has some incredible people on it with a vast wealth of knowledge. I have a question about the genus Pseudocorax. Do they have serrations, or don't they? Welton and Farrish write that the crowns of P. granti are smooth..."cutting edges smooth and very thin." Yet I see photos on the net of P. affinis that definitely have serrations. Does ones specie of Pseudocorax have serrations while another doesn't? Thank you in advance for any information relating to this! Randy
  2. Asking for more squalicorax help

    I have done some more research on the squalicorax that I posted about a few weeks ago. I ended up examining 886 teeth or fragments thereof. Of these, 79 showed a fossilization process in which the serrations (and sometimes the whole cusp) was covered with a white mineral. 48 were so worn that sometimes the serrations could barely be made out. 254 were too small or fragmented to be of any use (which does not preclude that they were of the same species as the rest). The remaining 632 all had the ornamentation that is so unusual. They can be found only on the labial side of the cusp (forgive my previous posts saying that they were on the lingual side...a stupid mistake on my part), and the majority are on the mesial edge of the cusp, although a smaller percentage have the ornamentationon the distal edge, and even fewer have them on both. . There are three types of ornamentation, the least common being a horizontal band below the top of the cusp. The second type consists of a small circular indentation, and can be found anywhere on the serration. The most common is a vertical triangle, with the apex of the triangle towards the top of the serration. I have no clue as to whether this is due to ontological heterodonty, sexual dimorphism, placement within the jaw, or something else. If anybody could check their S. falcatus examples (the closest that these teeth resemble), or any other Coniacian squalicorax, and see if this ornamentation is found beyond the fauna I am working on. I have corresponded with Mike Everhart (Oceans of Kansas), and this is new to him. All help will be greatly appreciated! I will post two pictures here, then two more immediately after. Thanks again! Randy
  3. Squalicorax

    Hey everyone, I don't have a lot of comparative material at hand, so I am asking for your help. I am working on a large shark fauna from the Cabezon area of New Mexico. The teeth are very beat up, possibly due to wave action on offshore sand bars. However, upon close inspection of the better teeth I have discovered that the serrations on the lingual side of the teeth contain indentations (or possible enable folding...see the photo). I have some squalicorax teeth from the Turonian, about 25 miles from this site, that were described in the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 52 (Bourdon, et. al., I was the tail end author) that also have these features. The closest we could identify these teeth were to slap a cf. or an aff. on them. Those of you who have identified to species squalicorax, could you check and see if they also have these lingual indentations or folds? Are these normal on all squalicorax species? Thank you!!! Randy Pence
  4. Hybodus

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Hybodus Houtienensis shark spine Permian to Cretaceous shark (impressive!!!!!) beautiful serration teeth down the back.
  5. Tooth with serrations?

    I came across this tooth in a local shop. Could only get two pics but I zoomed in on one to show the cutting edge. The tooth is labeled "carnosaur" and it's close to one inch in length. Not sure if this tooth is dinosaur or crocodile. I came across a previous thread here on the forum with pictures of a similar cutting edge that suggested it may be a mosasaur. Hoping for a possible ID before a possible purchase. Thank you!
  6. Smooth Tiger

    Hey all, This isn't so much a Fossil ID as it is a question. Can Tiger Shark teeth have smooth cutting edges if they're worn down enough? If so, then this tooth would certainly attest to that. I'm fairly certain that it came from the jaws of Physogaleus contortus (technically not a Tiger, but I call it one anyway). The strange thing is that it almost entirely lacks a defining feature of Tiger Shark teeth: serrations! The only evidence of a serrated edge are on the distal shoulder, but even there they are incredibly worn down. On the blade of the crown itself, the cutting edge is perfectly smooth, like a Hammerhead tooth. My question here is not if teeth can be worn down, because I know this. Some are so worn that they become unidentifiable! My question, rather, is why is the rest of this tooth hardly worn down at all while the serrations are doing a disappearing act? Do serrations on fossilized sharks teeth erode faster than the rest of the tooth? Thanks in advance for any help.
  7. Possible raptor tooth?

    So.......I've recently gotten into fossil collecting. It's very addicting, I'll admit. Anyway, I recently bought a neat little Kem Kem tooth that was supposedly listed as a "dromaeosaur" or "raptor" tooth. It wasn't too expensive, and of a decent size and quality, so if by chance it wasn't some sort of raptor tooth, I wasn't going to cry about wasting money. I have no idea why, since ignorance is bliss, but I had a sudden urge to look up identifying raptor teeth and stumbled across this impressive site (thank you for existing!!!!). I am now quite certain that my Kem Kem "dromaeosaur" tooth is most likely from some abelisaurid species, which I'm totally fine with since I was planning on buying one anyway. I'll post pictures of it later, since I already own it and can (hopefully) have it identified to the most likely species at my leisure. However, I stumbled across this tooth on my search for elusive raptor teeth. The seller has surprisingly (and respectably) titled it as an unclassified tooth from the Kem Kem area. To my amateur eyes, it looks like it might possibly belong to a raptor? It is supposedly 0.6 inch long. These are the only pictures the seller has provided so far, hopefully they will work. It looks like the mesial serrations (hopefully I'm using that right! New words, yay!) look like they curve slightly to the lingual surface at the base, at least to me.... I roughly sized up a picture of a ruler with millimeters to the pictures of the tooth. There are roughly 4 serrations per millimeter on the mesial side, and 3 per millimeter on the distal. What do you think? Lingual surface is the first picture, labial is the second.
  8. Serrated Kem Kem Teeth

    Was hoping to get a little help narrowing down an ID for two strange teeth from the Kem Kem Beds. I have no idea what the first might belong to, but wondering if the second might be some sort of serrated croc tooth? Hope the pictures are clear enough. The first tooth measures a tad over 9mm and serrations are 3 per mm. This second one is 14mm with 2.5 serrations per mm. Both teeth look to be complete, minus the root.
  9. South African shark tooth ID

    I just got this interesting white shark tooth, it was found somewhere on the west coast of South Africa. It has beautiful wavy edges, and looks to represent an early example of either escheri or hubbelli/carcharias. Id love to hear some thoughts on what lineage this tooth would be from given its location. Also, what species would you assign it to? cheers!
  10. Hi Everyone, I have been collecting fossil teeth for a couple of months and I have noticed that all of the hemipristis teeth I have collected have complete and sharp serrations on them. However, the teeth of other species that I collect, such as megalodons, do not tend to have complete and sharp serrations. Does anyone know why hemi teeth tend to keep all of their serrations despite the millions of years of wear and tear?
  11. Serrations per mm

    As most of you know by now, I am hosting a World Oceans Day. Beyond Eocene lake fish I am pretty ignorant. SOOOO this is a learning experience for me as well. I know people use a serration per mm count to ID dinosaur teeth that are closely related. Can this be done for shark teeth? because to me, a lot of them look similar. Are there any other teeth out there that we can use a serration per mm count to ID?
  12. Carcharodontosaurus tooth

    Tooth of a Carcharodontosaurus.
  13. Raptor tooth

    Tooth of a velociraptorine raptor. Specifically the serrations of the tooth are typical of Saurornitholestes.
  14. Shark Tooth Id

    Hello everybody! I have this fossil shark tooth. It measures 1&1/4 inch on its mesial side. It looks like an otodus obliquus but it is thinner and has some serrations on the middle of the one side.. Could it be an itermediate species? Anyone can help me ID ? Thank you very much in advance!
  15. Mosasaur Teeth

    Hi, I got a question: I have bought a tooth from the mosasaur Liodon. It is very find and all, but then i found this website, that said that the teeth from Liodon doesn't have any serrations. Then i got a little confused, because on the Liodon tooth i bought, i can clearly see serrations. So is this not a Liodon tooth after all, or is this just wrong information? Can somebody clear this out for me?
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