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Found 319 results

  1. Fossil fish fin?

    I found this fossil yesterday near Whitby at Runswick Bay. Ammonites and belemnites are common here in the Jurassic cliffs, but I also found this. I am unsure as to whether it may be part of a fish or something else entirely- can anyone help?
  2. Hello to all! Hope everyone is doing well, cause after my recent finds I am definitely doing well . So a little backstory: 10 years ago in grade school when I used to collect fossils with my father, we would never find any good fossils in shale. Always layer upon layer of the bland gray rocks with nothing even close to a fossil. For the longest time I never even bothered glancing at the large sections of shale dotting the many rivers of Toronto. jump ahead to the beginning of the month when I read some posts from @JUAN EMMANUEL showing some very nice nautiloids from shale. At first I didn't think anything of it and figured I'd never find anything THAT nice in shale. But, jump to a week later: While exploring a new location, I happen across a large section of layered shale on the riverbank and figured I'd try my luck - and started doing some digging. I pretty quickly came across a shell. A second shell. Then a third, fourth, fifth, and after chipping back the layer I found dozens of very tightly knit shells to my surprise. I was shocked to find anything after thinking for years that Toronto shale held almost nothing of interest. But still - they were ambonychia shells which I already have plenty of in my collection. So I keep looking around and chipping away at other layers, thinking maybe I'll find something a little more exciting. An hour goes by while digging in a somewhat awkward position, and my legs start to fall asleep so I readjusted my legs and out of the corner of my eye I noticed something right near my knee. My heart absolutely skipped a beat as I realized what I had found: A perfect and complete trilobite in the shale. After taking a closer look I realized there was in fact TWO of them right near each other! I hadn't found a trilobyte of this quality since grade school when I used to go with my father - let alone two. I just sat there for about 2 minutes staring at them, thinking they were going to shatter as soon as my pick got anywhere near them. Ultimately, luck played in my favour and the trilobites came out perfectly! But, the story doesn't end there, oh no! So now I'm going back to all these old places, primed with the fresh new knowledge of how to hunt shale. Although the work is pretty messy and uncomfortable, it seems to pay off quite nicely. And before I know it, a couple days later I end up finding yet another trilobite. But the crown jewel of the month came last weekend when I found two different nautiloids - one being an absolute MONSTER specimen, and the other being my most complete nautiloid ever (it even included the tip at the very end!). I just gotta give a big thanks to the people on this forum. Without the knowledge shared on this forum, I would likely have still been stuck in my ways avoiding any piece of shale in sight. I also have also included some other fossils that I found this month. [All fossils found in Humber, Etobicoke and Mimico river/creeks riverbanks - located in Toronto ON, Canada // Georgian Bay Formation // Ordovician (485.4 - 443.8Ma)] The first set of trilobites In Situ from humber river. The first two trilobites on the left and the later one on the right. The many pieces of nautiloid that came out during extraction. They unfortunately broke VERY easily so I figured there was no point stressing about it coming out in less than a dozen pieces. Here is what it looked like when all the pieces were assembled together (with the help of a little super glue of course). It even seems to have the very tip of the nautiloid as well (which would be a first for me)! here are a couple other decent pieces I found as well:
  3. Leaf Stem in shale perhaps

    Went looking for ferns and plants today. Spent my lunch hour splitting shale nearby. This one caught my eye. The ghosted pattern around the stem is interesting. I feel like it’s part of it seeing how symmetrical it is. And ideas? Length of the stem part is 2 1/8” (Don’t have a metric ruler handy) To me, the bottom portion is the base, so the shape is confusing.
  4. After some awesome advice from FF members, my family made it out to the Lost River quarry in WV (Devonian shale). We found a bunch of bivalve and trilobite partial fossils and two fossils that we can't ID (pics below). The first was found in a split piece of shale so one part mirrors the other (pieces are ~3x3in). Unsure if this is a fossil but any insight is appreciated! The second is a very small (1/4in) circular, striated fossil. Thanks!
  5. Location is in Missouri The area is dated to the Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale I was cracking Open some Concretions I found and this Came out of one! Unfortunately not in One piece. I was fortunate to find almost all of the pieces, including the tip, but do not know what adhesive to use Never the less I would like to know what species this is from! I have found various prehistoric fish parts from the rock Pile this has come from, Such as teeth from Eugeneodontida and Cartilage. The tip
  6. Mollusk ID Requested

    All, I found this fossil in a shale deposit of Pennsylvanian age in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale is probably Chanute formation and contains other marine fossils. I would appreciate any help with ID. Best wishes.
  7. Lepidostrobophyllum or something else?

    Hi all, I discovered this rather unusual fossil at an exposure of shale a few feet above the Mahoning coal of the Glenshaw formation, which is Westphalian D in age. I was thinking that it is probably just Lepidostrobophyllum, as the Mahoning coal is pre Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse so lycopod material is relative common within its horizon. For those of you that don’t know, Lepidostrobophyllum is a leaf like part of the Lycopod reproductive cone. However, I have found arthropod material at this exposure before and just wanted to make sure that it is in fact Lepidostrobophyllum and not something else. Thanks in advance
  8. Pecopteris sp.

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  9. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf with colorful iron oxide coating left by the plant itself Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  10. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern pinnae Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  11. Cordaites sp.

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Leaf cast with iron oxide coating left by the plant itself Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  12. Alethopteris2.JPG

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern leaf impression Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  13. Alethopteris fern with Cordaites leaf

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern Leaflet The white highlights are most likely kaolinite left from the plant itself. Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  14. Folks, I found this fossil mollusk from a shale deposit in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale is of Pennsylvanian age (probably Chanute formation), and contains other marine fossils. I would appreciate any help with ID. Best wishes.
  15. Fossil ID: Mahoning County Ohio

    Hello, I came across this while collecting some rocks to test. I did not take it for a fossil at first, but I am at a loss concerning what could have formed the pattern of the rock. The raised lines which I can only describe as “veiny” are really well defined and contoured. The dimensions are 4cm x 1.75cm x .75cm. I believe the rock is shale and it was found in Northern Mahoning County near Youngstown, Ohio alongside a river. The geologic map suggest that the rocks in the area may be from the Pennsylvanian period. Any help you guys can offer would be appreciated.
  16. Hi all, I didn't see anything about number of photos in each post so I have a few different IDs I am asking for help with, I've read the guidelines and will try to ensure I cover everythnig. These fossils are from North Cowichan on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. I believe this is the Maple Bay Formation in the Nanaimo Group and is from the Cretaceous period. The rock was very friable/fractured and may fossils were not collectible but I did collect a few and get pics of some in the field. 1. Bactulite? 2. Bryozoan? 3. Ammonite? (8 x 5.5 cm) - I can't quite get a good picture of it but there is an impression of what looks like a ribbed coil ~ 3 cm wide like a segment of ammonite) 4. Brachiopod? (sorry, forgot the ruler in that one but it is ~ 2 cm in diameter) Thanks for any assistance
  17. First off, sorry for taking a “field photo”. I took a photo of this and then we left it back at the pit (it’s pure chaos trying to keep 3 kids in order lol). We found a good bit of these darker things near the top of a shale pit in Mifflin Co (I think we’re still in Mifflin, if not it’s the southern tip of Centre). That one on the left by itself is around 2 1/2 inches long (~63mm). I tried to do some research and I think there was also some burrows in the shale in that area, but I’m a total noob so maybe I’m just seeing what I want to see (I’ll get photos of them next time we go out). Hopefully that’s enough info to get started. Let me know if I can add anything else or get more photos when we go back!
  18. Hi, just wondering what you guys use to extract fossils from shale thanks.
  19. Went up to Douglas Pass, Colorado today for a hike with my wife. I have always hunted for fossils at the Radar Dome location. Today we decided to scout around for another location to collect. Hiked up a very steep hill to a shale exposure and found this larvae after only 1 minute of looking. We had not come prepared today to collect anything. Will probably head back up next weekend. The larvae is approx 2.25 cm across. There are also some parts of other larvae on the piece.
  20. New York fossil trip by mail

    A while back, @Darktooth and I did a little trading. Somewhere in the mix, he mentioned that his educational outreach (and collection) would benefit from some examples of C. chubutensis. I sent a couple of examples and it seems all that cuspy goodness went to his head. I received a COVID care package from Dave a week or so ago that contained a complete New York fossil trip in a box! I was completely blown away and the objects have given me quite a bit of entertainment. The field-trip-in-a-box was complete with lovely hand written tags, so everything was ready to put right into a large riker box. No way Dave could have known this, but my family has been self-quarantined because my son had a known COVID exposure. This care package has been a welcome distraction, to say the least! My absolute favorite is the Grammysioidea. I'd seen these in past posts and online. They are just as cool in person as in pictures. Thanks for the awesome collection and distraction Dave! Case with fossils and labels Bembexia sulcomarginate Dipleura dekayi Grammysioidea alveata Greenops sp Greenops sp Greenops sp Rhipidomella sp
  21. Folks, These photos are from a small section of shale I picked up in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale contains marine fossils of Pennsylvanian age. I have questions about a couple of the labeled objects. I’m thinking the center one may be a brachiopod (or possibly a bryzoan--it's hard to tell because of the crinoid plate resting above it). The one on the right looks to me like a bryzoan. However, I’m a novice at identification so I’d appreciate any opinions. The putative bryzoan appears to have grown on the crinoid stem. Best wishes.
  22. Hi all! Well, now I am into splitting shale finding conodonts and will post my best ones soon, but I've come across several of these which are comparable to images in the forum and on references to Listracanthus denticles?. It was found in Pennsylvanian Stark shale member in Kansas City two days ago. Is that a fair i.d.? They're are all very similar, but I've found this as well- a "carbonized" film with a structure that doesn't have straight lines, but somewhat veinated? Very difficult to get pics of that so provided several in different light. The first is 27mm long and the black piece is only about 2-3mm at most. Am I on the right track on the first, and any ideas on the second? same, fish fin, plant impression/other? thanks! Bone Then here's the other one- found in a different slab of shale but same level- the bottom "ridge" appears to diverge in the first couple pictures, then there appears to be divergence in the middle in the darker pics. Any thoughts welcomed! Bone
  23. All, I wonder if someone may have an opinion about the object(s) in the small nodule shown here? The entire nodule is about 0.63 inch wide x 0.75 inch long x 0.5 inch thick (1.6 cm x 1.9 cm x 1.3 cm). It came from an area of shale that is likely of Pennsylvanian age in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale from this location has many fossil marine invertebrates. I'm assuming its a mineral formation, but any thoughts would be appreciated. It is very hard to get the 3-D relief to show up in photos, so several angles and lighting conditions are shown. Best wishes.
  24. Trace fossils or water residue?

    So- been starting to look for my first conodonts in black shale in the Kansas City area and I commonly see what appears to be mineral deposits left when water seeps through layers, then dries, but these are in winterset limestone (as best I can tell) and while they look similar, maybe these are trace fossils? thanks for taking a look! Bone
  25. burrow.jpg

    From the album Mancos Shale - Grand Junction, CO

    Marine burrow. Found this down in the Mancos shale, loose. Possibly from the overlying Mesaverde formation. I have seen many burrows in the Mesaverde sandstone.
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