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Found 326 results

  1. All, I have been finding a few dermal denticles in Northeast Oklahoma Pennsylvanian shales. Based on published reports and images from our area, I believe these are Petrodus. I’ve attached an image of two denticles I found yesterday. I’ve been looking for images of the entire shark because I’m curious about the animal’s overall appearance; however, I’m only finding images of the denticles. Do scientists know what these sharks looked like, and if so, does anyone know of resources containing overall images? Best wishes.
  2. Greetings experts, enthusiasts, and fellow pareidolia sufferers. I just got back from spending a couple of nights at Jalama Beach Park. I did manage to get in a little bit of rock splitting while there. I didn't see anything fish-like. After searching for a bit before my back said "no more", I reached the pick end of my hammer over towards a larger chunk of material and gave it a whack on the side where I thought it would split. It split nicely. At first I didn't see anything, and maybe I still didn't see anything, but something did stand out as unusual no matter what it actually is. At the bottom of that balloon shaped staining there is iron-colored staining(?) that is reminiscent of a human fingerprint. And while I know it's impossible for it to be a trilobite in such a formation, the imprint looks like a trilobite stain. The overall shape of the staining also looks like a horseshoe crab. All of that said, I'm thinking that it's most likely a seaweed fossil print something of that nature. Any thoughts are appreciated. If anybody would like another image of another area on the split, let me know. Cheers all. MrR.
  3. Petrified wood?

    Found this at the edge of a shallow stream bed that flies down from Smoky Mountain region in East Tennessee at Indian Boundary Lake near Tellico Plains Tennessee at edge if Cherokee National Forest. It measures 2" long, 1.75" at widest 1/2" deep at deepest. A bit more flat on one side. Cross section shows a thin outer layer. Outside look reminds me of wood but I don't know. Looks like photos too big so I will load another below.
  4. Shale fossils, ventura CA

    Hello, I found these shale fossils on sulpher mountain hiking trail in Ventura california. I think one might be a fish scale and I have no idea of what the other could be. Any ideas? Thanks for looking
  5. I thought this 6" split was an interesting conglomerate of various barchipods and others impressions from a drift pile near Newberry, MI. About the only impressions it lacks are a good trilobite impression, (though there is a softly pressed one on the other side) and graptolites. I don't know what any of these are, but they are pretty common in my splits... the little #3 image has brothers in almost every split ranging from 1/2 Inch long to 8 inches long ( longest one I have found there. ) such a cool degrading hill. Everyyear I go, more rocks have tumbled out of the hillside , waiting to be picked up. Locals come and scoop the stone up and use it for refurbishing their driveways...Nothing earthshaking here I suppose, but lovely, lovely fossils, all of them impressions or thin remanants like # 7.Most of the impressions do contain some remnant of the original creature, so they are fun to look at, but none of them would survive being chipped out of the rock. Almost forgot, I am actually interested if anyone knows what # 6 is, that ridged brachipod. thanks.
  6. Florissant I.Ds

    At Florissant Colorado (dated to the Eocene) my family and I found these fossils and I would like to I D them to know what I found. I didn’t have a 12 inch/30 centimeter ruler so I used my six inch to make a ruler on a piece of paper it is accurate I promise. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.
  7. Has anybody found crinoids in kinnekulle sweden? I have only found one small bracipod and a small gastropod and are these crinoids and in what layer should i look for more crinoids and shells? On top of the quarry theres shale i only find trilobites and squids there but anyways are these crinoids or something else?
  8. Fossil fish fin?

    I found this fossil yesterday near Whitby at Runswick Bay. Ammonites and belemnites are common here in the Jurassic cliffs, but I also found this. I am unsure as to whether it may be part of a fish or something else entirely- can anyone help?
  9. Hello to all! Hope everyone is doing well, cause after my recent finds I am definitely doing well . So a little backstory: 10 years ago in grade school when I used to collect fossils with my father, we would never find any good fossils in shale. Always layer upon layer of the bland gray rocks with nothing even close to a fossil. For the longest time I never even bothered glancing at the large sections of shale dotting the many rivers of Toronto. jump ahead to the beginning of the month when I read some posts from @JUAN EMMANUEL showing some very nice nautiloids from shale. At first I didn't think anything of it and figured I'd never find anything THAT nice in shale. But, jump to a week later: While exploring a new location, I happen across a large section of layered shale on the riverbank and figured I'd try my luck - and started doing some digging. I pretty quickly came across a shell. A second shell. Then a third, fourth, fifth, and after chipping back the layer I found dozens of very tightly knit shells to my surprise. I was shocked to find anything after thinking for years that Toronto shale held almost nothing of interest. But still - they were ambonychia shells which I already have plenty of in my collection. So I keep looking around and chipping away at other layers, thinking maybe I'll find something a little more exciting. An hour goes by while digging in a somewhat awkward position, and my legs start to fall asleep so I readjusted my legs and out of the corner of my eye I noticed something right near my knee. My heart absolutely skipped a beat as I realized what I had found: A perfect and complete trilobite in the shale. After taking a closer look I realized there was in fact TWO of them right near each other! I hadn't found a trilobyte of this quality since grade school when I used to go with my father - let alone two. I just sat there for about 2 minutes staring at them, thinking they were going to shatter as soon as my pick got anywhere near them. Ultimately, luck played in my favour and the trilobites came out perfectly! But, the story doesn't end there, oh no! So now I'm going back to all these old places, primed with the fresh new knowledge of how to hunt shale. Although the work is pretty messy and uncomfortable, it seems to pay off quite nicely. And before I know it, a couple days later I end up finding yet another trilobite. But the crown jewel of the month came last weekend when I found two different nautiloids - one being an absolute MONSTER specimen, and the other being my most complete nautiloid ever (it even included the tip at the very end!). I just gotta give a big thanks to the people on this forum. Without the knowledge shared on this forum, I would likely have still been stuck in my ways avoiding any piece of shale in sight. I also have also included some other fossils that I found this month. [All fossils found in Humber, Etobicoke and Mimico river/creeks riverbanks - located in Toronto ON, Canada // Georgian Bay Formation // Ordovician (485.4 - 443.8Ma)] The first set of trilobites In Situ from humber river. The first two trilobites on the left and the later one on the right. The many pieces of nautiloid that came out during extraction. They unfortunately broke VERY easily so I figured there was no point stressing about it coming out in less than a dozen pieces. Here is what it looked like when all the pieces were assembled together (with the help of a little super glue of course). It even seems to have the very tip of the nautiloid as well (which would be a first for me)! here are a couple other decent pieces I found as well:
  10. Leaf Stem in shale perhaps

    Went looking for ferns and plants today. Spent my lunch hour splitting shale nearby. This one caught my eye. The ghosted pattern around the stem is interesting. I feel like it’s part of it seeing how symmetrical it is. And ideas? Length of the stem part is 2 1/8” (Don’t have a metric ruler handy) To me, the bottom portion is the base, so the shape is confusing.
  11. After some awesome advice from FF members, my family made it out to the Lost River quarry in WV (Devonian shale). We found a bunch of bivalve and trilobite partial fossils and two fossils that we can't ID (pics below). The first was found in a split piece of shale so one part mirrors the other (pieces are ~3x3in). Unsure if this is a fossil but any insight is appreciated! The second is a very small (1/4in) circular, striated fossil. Thanks!
  12. Location is in Missouri The area is dated to the Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale I was cracking Open some Concretions I found and this Came out of one! Unfortunately not in One piece. I was fortunate to find almost all of the pieces, including the tip, but do not know what adhesive to use Never the less I would like to know what species this is from! I have found various prehistoric fish parts from the rock Pile this has come from, Such as teeth from Eugeneodontida and Cartilage. The tip
  13. Mollusk ID Requested

    All, I found this fossil in a shale deposit of Pennsylvanian age in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale is probably Chanute formation and contains other marine fossils. I would appreciate any help with ID. Best wishes.
  14. Lepidostrobophyllum or something else?

    Hi all, I discovered this rather unusual fossil at an exposure of shale a few feet above the Mahoning coal of the Glenshaw formation, which is Westphalian D in age. I was thinking that it is probably just Lepidostrobophyllum, as the Mahoning coal is pre Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse so lycopod material is relative common within its horizon. For those of you that don’t know, Lepidostrobophyllum is a leaf like part of the Lycopod reproductive cone. However, I have found arthropod material at this exposure before and just wanted to make sure that it is in fact Lepidostrobophyllum and not something else. Thanks in advance
  15. Pecopteris sp.

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  16. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern leaf with colorful iron oxide coating left by the plant itself Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  17. Neuropteris ovata

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Fern pinnae Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  18. Cordaites sp.

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Leaf cast with iron oxide coating left by the plant itself Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  19. Alethopteris2.JPG

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern leaf impression Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  20. Alethopteris fern with Cordaites leaf

    From the album Plants of the Lewellyn Formation

    Tree Fern Leaflet The white highlights are most likely kaolinite left from the plant itself. Columbia County, Pennsylvania Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation
  21. Folks, I found this fossil mollusk from a shale deposit in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale is of Pennsylvanian age (probably Chanute formation), and contains other marine fossils. I would appreciate any help with ID. Best wishes.
  22. Fossil ID: Mahoning County Ohio

    Hello, I came across this while collecting some rocks to test. I did not take it for a fossil at first, but I am at a loss concerning what could have formed the pattern of the rock. The raised lines which I can only describe as “veiny” are really well defined and contoured. The dimensions are 4cm x 1.75cm x .75cm. I believe the rock is shale and it was found in Northern Mahoning County near Youngstown, Ohio alongside a river. The geologic map suggest that the rocks in the area may be from the Pennsylvanian period. Any help you guys can offer would be appreciated.
  23. Hi all, I didn't see anything about number of photos in each post so I have a few different IDs I am asking for help with, I've read the guidelines and will try to ensure I cover everythnig. These fossils are from North Cowichan on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. I believe this is the Maple Bay Formation in the Nanaimo Group and is from the Cretaceous period. The rock was very friable/fractured and may fossils were not collectible but I did collect a few and get pics of some in the field. 1. Bactulite? 2. Bryozoan? 3. Ammonite? (8 x 5.5 cm) - I can't quite get a good picture of it but there is an impression of what looks like a ribbed coil ~ 3 cm wide like a segment of ammonite) 4. Brachiopod? (sorry, forgot the ruler in that one but it is ~ 2 cm in diameter) Thanks for any assistance
  24. First off, sorry for taking a “field photo”. I took a photo of this and then we left it back at the pit (it’s pure chaos trying to keep 3 kids in order lol). We found a good bit of these darker things near the top of a shale pit in Mifflin Co (I think we’re still in Mifflin, if not it’s the southern tip of Centre). That one on the left by itself is around 2 1/2 inches long (~63mm). I tried to do some research and I think there was also some burrows in the shale in that area, but I’m a total noob so maybe I’m just seeing what I want to see (I’ll get photos of them next time we go out). Hopefully that’s enough info to get started. Let me know if I can add anything else or get more photos when we go back!
  25. Hi, just wondering what you guys use to extract fossils from shale thanks.
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