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Found 695 results

  1. I’m Located in Savannah, GA but take day trips to Summerville, SC often. We find very good teeth here in Savannah including Megs at our more secret islands on the banks. I usually go with my wife and son but I wanted to find better spots in Summerville to take my kid instead of taking the boat to the islands. Would anybody want to swap spots with me? I would take you on the boat to the islands we hunt from if I can get some inside where to go in summerville.
  2. Virginia

    Hello all. Looking for some help/advice. Heading to Williamsburg, VA this weekend and am looking to do a quick morning of fossil hunting for shark teeth, maybe 3-4 hour time window. Does anyone know any general spots that are accessible to public. Was gonna do York river state park but they only allow you to keep one fossil. Chippokes is close but it looks like it takes a while to get across it around the James. Was hoping to find somewhere right near Williamsburg or on way back towards SW Va. Any help is much appreciated.
  3. My family and I took a road trip all the way from canada to try and find some shark teeth and whatever other adventures we could find. Before we hit the beach we headed to the smithsionian in washington d.c . What an amazing experience we had and could literally spends days to fully appreciate everything they had to offer. Next stop was bayfront park maryland. The weather was cold and windy and the water was ice cold, but that didn't stop us! After a few tries with the sifter we found our very first tooth, a feeling I will never forget thats for sure. After searching for 2 hours and finding many small teeth we decided to head out to our next destination Aurora. The town is small and the few people we did meet were very kind. My two kids really liked digging here as it's nice and safe with a guaranteed chance of finding teeth. I highly recommend aurora for family's and newbies looking to find teeth. The museum is really cool with awsome fossils and some good stuff to buy. Our next location bought us to the famous GMR in Greenville . Everyone I talked to said it's flooded don't waste your time but being stubborn I went anyways. Lol I was able to find a small location that allowed me to get down and do some sifting. I found some really nice teeth but the GW I really wanted didn't happen for me this trip. There was lots of broken glass and garbage in the spot I was so be careful . We hooked up with george powell jr while we were in greenville and like many people have said he truly is one of the nicest people I have ever met. He took hours showing me and my family his collection and it's just leaves you in aww. ThanKS George! I'm really thinking of getting my diving certificate for future trips! The rest of the trip is none fossil related so I will spare you all that lol but we had a blast and found the fossil community to be very warm and welcoming. Cheers
  4. Post Oak Creek Shark Tooth Fossils

    After fossils hunting in the North Sulphur River, I decided to go and check out Post Oak Creek in Sherman, Texas. I found 83 teeth there in one day, some of which I am interested in getting identified. These teeth are from the Upper Cretaceous period.
  5. I have the chance to fly down to NC on Sunday. I was wondering if there are any shark teeth on the beaches of the Kill Devil Hills area, just north of Nags Head. If the weather holds up my buddy and I are likely to make the trip just to see 1st Flight Airport and museum but I would love, obviously, to walk on the beach looking for a tooth!! Thanks. Andy
  6. Yesterday we knocked out our first Dinosaur Rock education program, tomorrow we do our first 3 Sharks Through Time education program. Unlike Monday when I was pretty nervous about our first program ever, I am relaxed and ready to talk about shark adaptations over 400 million years. We have nice fossil displays, the science is strong, and FREE shark tooth laden fossil starter kits. A HUGE thank you goes out to all who donated. Those donations are getting into the hands of kids We will hand out 100 fossil kits tomorrow and by the end of our first official week of operation, close to 150 fossil starter kits will be in the hands of local elementary students. That is not a bad first week at all.
  7. I wanted to share some pictures from a recent trip to SW Florida. I grew up in FL but I didn’t do any fossil hunting until I moved to CA and found Shark Tooth Hill. I was really excited to get out and find some Florida fossils. Unfortunately, the Peace River was too high to hunt so we have to explore some smaller rivers that weren’t too flooded. That worked out for me because we found some great fossils! Some members of the forum were nice enough to show me around. I sent out a box of STH finds to my FL friends to get some fossil goodwill going. I think some of them were posted for ID in another thread. I really enjoyed what to me was easy digging in the Florida creeks, it was kind of hot out for February but the weather was great for being in the water. I was really surprised about the diversity of fossils found, at one point on the bank we found an area that had both land and marine fossils in the same layer. You could walk around and just pick cool stuff up. That is where I found the Giant Armadillo jaw section that won the fossil of the month. It was a nice contrast to STH where you tend to find the same type of fossils over and over. I hope you enjoy the pictures.
  8. Last week I was on holiday in the Netherlands/Belgium for a short time and I had the chance to visit the area of Antwerp to find some shark teeth. Too bad the weather wasnt good (I think it rained the entire day). Nevertheless I found some teeth and I have to say that I am kinda satisfed with the result! I almost sieved the whole day so my body still hurts a bit The material I searched in comes from the Miocene, Pliocene and was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock in Antwerp. Here are two "in-situ" pictures: A nice tooth on the sifter: Pictures of the nicest teeth: A nice dolphin tooth with enamel (4 cm long): A dolphin ear bone: (a little bit more than 2 cm long) An Isurus retroflexus tooth (3 cm long): And an 4.2 cm long Cosmopolitodus hastalis: (I am not sure if I determined this one right ...) I think I will post some more detailed pictures of other teeth in the next days! Thanks for watching
  9. Dawson creek trip

    I had to work in Pamlico Co. NC today. While at the Dawson creek bridge I ran across a couple of piles of material like they have at the fossil museum. I couldn’t spend much time picking but it was fun for a few minutes.
  10. Hey all, The Calvert Cliffs have been falling left and right recently. Countless cliff slides have led to plenty of new material becoming accessible on the beaches, but the unstable cliffs also call for extra caution. I decided to return to my favorite winter hunting location, Bayfront Park, to try and take advantage of the cliff falls. I thought it would be a good opportunity to film my first YouTube video, which I have been wanting to do for a while, so I brought my new handheld camera mount. Peak low tide was exactly at sunrise, so I woke up at 4 a.m. in order to arrive at the beach before then. Early mornings can be rough, but if you're getting up to do something you love it's a whole lot easier. When I got to the parking lot, it was still very dark and I actually had to use my phone's flashlight to hunt for the first few minutes before the sun began its ascent into the horizon. It was a very cloudy day, so unfortunately I wasn't treated with one of the gorgeous Brownies sunrises. Within 10 or 15 minutes or searching, I found one of the biggest teeth I've ever found at Brownies, a huge 2 inch mako in perfect condition. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day. Not too long after that, I stumbled across a circular object slightly covered by sand. It looked like it could be some kind of vertebra or possible a "cookie" (dolphin epiphysis), but there was only one way to find out. When I tried pulling it out, it didn't budge. I pulled harder. As it still wouldn't come out, I realized it must be much larger than it appeared on the surface. Throwing aside the rock next to it, I finally pulled out a beautiful cetacean vertebra! I've always wanted to find one, especially after running into a guy who found a dozen of them on my last Brownies trip, so I was ecstatic. I continued finding some very nice teeth. I also found another cetacean vertebra, this time a very different shape but in very good condition. Despite the harsh temperature and dangerous cliffs, there were quite a few other hunters out on the beach. At one point I ran into a man who had found two perfects Megs, each one about 2 inches. I hoped to find one for myself, but had no such luck. Regardless, I was extremely content with everything I found and began to make my way back to the car. This trip was one to remember, not only because of the awesome finds, but also the fun experience of filming the video. I kept this trip report rather short, because the video covers the detail I usually go into, and then some. Anyway, I've wanted to become a fossil hunting YouTuber pretty much ever since I began hunting, but I just never really got around to it until now. I love watching YouTubers like @addicted2fossils, and I hope others will find my videos to be entertaining and educational as well. I've posted the link to my video below, and I would really appreciate it if you would take a second to like the video, leave a comment, and subscribe to my channel. I'll be putting out many videos like this in the future. I have some very exciting trips coming up, including hunting at a private creek site and going to the annual Aurora Fossil Festival in NC! Stay tuned. Hoppe hunting!
  11. Hello I am setting a 4 day trip to Florida with my son to find Shark Teeth and bone mid March. He is a teenager and experienced; we did a Summer trip to Summerville, SC. We hear rains have Florida rivers and streams fairly high right now? We have never hunted for fossils in Florida; but are looking to areas along the Peace River and researched Arcadia may be a good central location? We are thinking of doing: * Day 1 - Excursion with a guide (allows us to familiarize us with the area; dos and don'ts) * Day 2 - Hit Peace River (I have some general ideas of locations, but could use help) * Day 3 - Try some adjacent Rivers (I have some general ideas of locations, but could use help) * Day 4 - Either repeat above if we have success, or try Casperson beach in Venice Any insights/guidance would be fantastic. Thank you! Ken
  12. Hey TFF Members! Here's the second video of 2 days of fossil hunting that Cris and I did when it was a high of around 85/86 both days.... in February?! Florida is strange, but I love this so much compared to the weather where I was born up in Michigan. It's nice to be able to enjoy the outdoors comfortably all year! This was an extremely fun trip, other than the fact CRIS FOUND ALL THE GOOD MEGALODON TEETH! Hahaha. I still found some cool stuff, so I guess it's okay Hope you all can watch it when you get a chance!
  13. I have detailed our shark education program in previous posts but I forgot the best part. Fossils on Wheels has around 350-400 shark teeth that will be given away to kids. All of these come from donations. My son and I have donated around half and the rest have come from donors on TFF, who we have thanked in previous posts. These are really my favorite fossils because they serve a higher purpose. Getting kids interested in science, natural history, fossils and of course, SHARKS !!! I write a lot in these posts but the core of what we do is summarized above. This is fun and we are feel lucky to be doing this. The donations from TFF members are allowing us to do this and the kids will know it. Thanks to donations of marine invertebrate fossils, these teeth are going to become fossil starter kits with other fossils mixed in. The pictured below are some of the fossils. Some STH mako teeth and about 100 Squalicorax teeth are not in the picture because they are in my laundry room at the moment. Tomorrow, I start bagging these and putting together information cards so I wll know exactly how many fossil start kits we will have in a day or two. We have a nice mix Moroccan Squalicorax, Sand Tiger teeth and Otodus teeth, a significant number of STH mako teeth, teeth from a few smaller STH shark species, a few Ptychodus, and a few Goblin Shark teeth. We are trying to make sure we give away teeth from species we cover in the presentation. THANK YOU FOSSIL FORUM MEMBERS for helping us make this happen
  14. Hey TFF members! Some friends visited us from out of state and we had a great time showing them the amazing fossils that Florida has to offer. They also got to experience our whacky winters with it being 85 degrees in February! I was born in a Michigan... I'm not complaining! We found some awesome stuff though, so I hope you can give the video a watch when you have some time. This was such a fun one!
  15. Venice Beach Hunting

    Had the chance to do a little hunting at Venice Beach while on vacation. Didn't find anything of size and the teeth were pretty common ones. Lot's of really small teeth and ray teeth. Some nice coral pieces. Was hoping for a Hemi but no such luck. What was really cool were the "boulders" they were using to help stop beach erosion.
  16. Id please

    Can anyone ID these two teeth for me please. Thanks!
  17. Fossils on Wheels got our first donations of fossil materials for our education program this week. My son and I have donated some of our fossils and loaned the rest. Since we are applying for a 501c3, we have to keep careful track of our fossils. IF they are paid for by Fossils on Wheels money, they belong to Fossils on Wheels. If they are purchased with our money, we donate and loan. Donations belong to Fossils on Wheels, not my son and I. I think that clarification is a good thing to let people know about because donations come from our new friends private collections and they are given with the intention of being used for education and given to the kiddos we educate. My son and I do not sell fossils. Fossils on Wheels will not be legally able to sell fossils. We will also not be trading donated fossils. They are strictly for education purposes. If you do donate fossils, we can track how they are used and verify where they end up. We had two donations this week and we want to thank our donors. The first donation was from @JBMugu and included a lot of shark teeth and mammal bones from Sharktooth Hill a.k.a Round Mountain Silt. Most of the teeth will be given to students from Paradise and Chico schools. A small number will stay in the program for shark tooth ID labs. A couple dozen of the teeth are headed to the Gateway Science Museum as a separate donation. The mammal bones will be used in our intermediate school education programs that focus on classification and evolution. All of these fossils, except for one ear bone, will be used for hands on exploration of fossils. The ear bone, I think it is from a small Odontoceti, will be used as a presentation piece for the evolution lab. We also got a donation of some super cool shark teeth from @caldigger and information explaining some of the differences in the fossilization process and why different fossils from different locations look different. We do want to explore the process of fossilization and how geology lets us learn about the natural history of the planet. This donation included a super cool split tooth that shows in the process perfectly. These teeth are for the presentation and the kids will get to handle a few of them in ID labs as well. We just wanted to thank our donors and to let our fellow TFF members know how much these donations help us with our goal is bringing fossil education to our local children. The first picture is various verts from STH. The large one, bottom left, is a cetacean. It looks very similar to a couple of Tiphyocetus verts from STH that i have. There is another large one which I would think would be cetacean. The smaller mammal verts I am not sure about. There is also a shark vert. Second picture is STH shark teeth. There C. hastalis, planus, plus a few tiger sharks and a few I am unsure about right now. Some still have STH dirt on them and I am thinking about having kids clean them during a lab. The third picture is the shark teeth from @caldigger including our first Pygmy White Shark teeth from morocco, some beautiful mako teeth and a few others that I need to ID.
  18. Hey TFF Members! If you saw the last video I shared, we took our buddy Bob from Canada out Echinoid hunting in Yankeetown recently. He was in town for a few days so we also had a chance to take him shark tooth hunting! We didn't find anything huge, but we found a lot of really great fossils. The teeth here are very colorful and there are a lot of them. Of course, this video isn't lacking in Cris and I's strange shenanigans Even though we didn't find anything insane, it was an amazing day spent with great people, and we found tons of cool fossils. This beats a day at the office any day! Give it a watch if you are interested and have some time
  19. Hello everyone, I am making a shadow box for my office; before I start doing the final groupings by species and attaching said groupings to the shadow box, I could really use some help. I have made my best educated guesses (using Jayson’s website for references), but since I am a novice, I know I’ve made several mistakes. Will you you please take a look at the attached pictures and let me know if I guessed correctly? If not, will you please let me know the correct answer?
  20. Tooth found in Wisconsin

    Okay, I found this tooth in Wisconsin. It was on the shore of an island that was land 90 years ago. Can anyone tell me if this is a shark tooth. The closest I can tell is its a mako, but all history books say that would be impossible. Maybe its reptile or some kind of gar, or maybe a even a mammal... Here is a video link.....and yes I'm a painter on break, hence the dirty hands lol.
  21. Our last post ended with goblin sharks and the next era up in the presentation is one of my favorites. We get to the large sharks of the Cretaceous. This is also where the adaptations get more specific and where the science gets more heavy duty for the kids such as discussing regional endothermy. I am a firm believer than you do not "dumb down" complicated science to elementary students. You simplify and explain, you do not dumb it down. First up are the giant crushing sharks, Ptychodus. We present both P. mortoni and p. whipplei though most of the discussion is about mortoni. The kids will learn that there were at least 22 species of Ptychodus sharks, they are Hybodontid sharks and they were found in many locations around the world. They were plentiful in the Western Interior Seaway. They were large, probably very slow swimming bottom dwelling invertebrate eating specialists. We imagine them as looking similar to giant nurse sharks with features of the hybodonts. The focus is on those teeth and we have quite a few to show the kids. We explain how the separate teeth formed a plate like dentition for crushing shells. Next up is one of my favorite sharks, Cretoxyrhina mantelli. The Ginsu Shark gives us the rare chance to really described a prehistoric shark without theorizing much. The fossil record has been generous and this is a very well studied shark. We will explain to the kids that these were large sharks, up to 26 feet, and they looked very similar to modern Great Whites in general appearance. Despite being smaller than some of the monster marine reptiles, they were an apex predator. The key adaptation is the regional endothermy. For kids this goes like this... They had red muscles closer to the body axis and specialized blood vessels that allow for heat exchange. This means they were in a sense warm-blooded and this is a trait seen in modern sharks like Threshers, Makos and White Sharks. They could tolerate colder water than other species and were probably extremely fast sharks. I think the kids will get this concept and they will think this was one cool, though also kinda warm, shark lol At some point, I would love to add Cardabiodon to the program but have not seen around for sale so I assume they are rare and likely expensive. Anyway, the fossils for the program. Pic 1 One of the Ptychodus mortoni teeth we have from the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas. We have six and several are partial but put them all together in a Riker mount and they look pretty good. Pic 2 Ptychodus whipplei teeth from Kamp Ranch formation. We have a small assortment of these teeth and use them in the lab and as giveaways too. Pic 3 Cretoxyrhina mantelli from the Niobrara Chalk. Not the biggest tooth out there but one that I am very thankful to have. I will add more of these as we go along mostly because I love this species !!
  22. After the Hybodontids, our program starts to transition toward the modern sharks. We introduce lamniform sharks and the cow sharks. We will not be able to spend much time at all on the Cow and Crow Sharks. They only get a brief introduction and a look at the teeth. Squalicorax is an important species for us even though we do not spend a lot of time on it. The students in first few classes we do presentations for will be going home with Squalicorax teeth from Morocco. We would like to spend more time on the Cow sharks eventually but we only have one tooth to show them and we will have to edit content to free up space for them but I will work on that down the road. The primary focus in this section is Scapanorhynchus. The first shark art Carter did was a Goblin and we do give them a lot of time in the presentaton. They look cool and have been around for a long time. We present the kids with a nice assortment of teeth and some cool science. The teeth were important adaptations for catching fish and the snout had the ampullae of Lorenzini for sensing changes in the electro magnetic fields around them. We compare this to the modern hammerhead which we do not cover in the program but gives the kids a sense of how the adaptations of hammerheads work. We also talk about fin structure and being able to tell they were slow swimmers. The extend-o-matic jaw is another adaptation we cover with this species. I am happy with the fossil representations for now though I really want to add more Cow Shark fossils at some point and Anomotodon would also be a good addition. The fossils for the presentation.. Pic 1 Hexanchus andersoni from STH. I know H. andersoni should chronologically fit later but Cow Sharks fit here and this is the only one we have for now. Pic 2- Squalicorax pristodontus from Morocco. This is our largest Squalicorax tooth. The kids will get these teeth to take home so while we do not spend a lot of time on them, the teeth are very important to the program. Pic 3- Scapnorhynchus texanus and Scapanorhynchus puercoensis. Our nice little Goblin Shark display with some of our best teeth. Two of the texanus teeth are over 1.5 inches and the puercoenisis teeth are uncommon I believe and pretty super cool.
  23. Our last post left off just before the Permian so this is where the students will learn about the series extinction events known as The Great Dying. One of the really interesting points in shark evolution is the survival of sharks during this period. They survived by adapting to a vastly different climate and a much different aquatic world. This is when the Hydobonts really emerge and the age of the modern shark starts. The first species we cover are the xenacanthids. We originally placed the Eel Sharks in the Golden Age of Sharks section but I wanted to illustrate that some that while a few xenacanthid sharks survived the Permian extinction, they died off shortly after. They were apex predators in freshwater ecosystems until 266 mya. The adaptations we hit on are the forked teeth and eel like body. Despite being an apex predator and some initially surviving the Permian, they were unable to survive long term either due to being unable to adapt to long term changes in the aquatic environments they formally dominated or were out competed by animals better adapted or both. The Hybodonts first start appearing in the fossil record in the Carboniferous era and much of the diversity of the family was lost during Permian but Hybodonts would became the dominant shark of the Triassic and lasted until the Miocene. They were varied in form, size, and habitat. Hybodont sharks lived in freshwater environments and marine environments. They are known from fossil formations that are shallow and deep. They evolved to fill a variety of ecological niches. They had different kinds of teeth for different kinds of prey. We specifically touch on Hybodus obtusus, Lissodes minimus, and the tiny, fairly recently described Reticulodus synergus as those are the species we have. My son's early sketch of Reticulodus is super cool. Given that this is smallest shark we are discussing, the art work is the hook more than the micro fossil. This is the one spot in the shark program that is a little visually underwhelming from a fossil standpoint. We have only a few small items so it lacks the visual appeal of the weirdness of earlier sharks and the WOW effect of the giant sharks that follow. This is a very fixable issue for us. I found a source for Orthacanthus teeth and we are planning on picking up a nice dentition set to go with our partial spine. Carter drew his Orthacanthus in a position that will match the dentition and spine when we have the teeth. A weakness now will be a visual strength in a month or two. I would really love to pick up an Anstercanthus tooth and spine too. They seem to be out there on the market from time to time. We plan on grabbing a few more Lissodes teeth and Reticulodus teeth too. A number of small teeth can make a nice display. Here are the fossils we currently have for the presentation Pic 1 Orthacanthus texanus tooth and partial spine of an unidentified Orthacanthus. Both are from Oklahoma I believe. Pic 2 Hybodus obtusus tooth. A small tooth and one that needs some additional material. Pic 3 A picture of all the fossils for the presentation including Lissodes minimus and Reticulodus synergus. Yup the dots are cool shark teeth lol I actually love the tiny sharks and this will be one of my favorite spots in the presentation because we deliver these right before we get into the giant animals that follow.
  24. Our shark adaptation education program for elementary students follows up the Cladodonts with three of the craziest looking early sharks and three that we think kids will love learning about. The Eugeneodontid "sharks" may not be sharks but they are just too cool not to teach the kids about. Bizarre is interesting and I also love talking about evolutionary extremes. The best part of these next animals is that they each allow my son to really stretch out as an artist and create some weird looking creatures. The kids will learn that Edestus were large, predatory shark-like fish that are related to modern ratfish. We will quickly cover the tooth whorl which is where the term Scissor-tooth comes from. I have been reading theories as to how the teeth were used and I think it will be fun to discuss possible feeding methods with the kids. We will not spend much time on Listracanthus because there is not much information about them. I have seen them described as being eel-like and covered in the "feather" denticles. This is one that is really about the artwork so my son is the star with this species. Can not wait to see his finished rendition. I think the kids will really love Stethacanthus. I know it is a cladodont but we separate it in the presentation. The Anvil Shark is a wild creature. The anvil shaped, denticle covered spine, patch of spine on its head, and the whip-like projections from the pectoral fins are adaptations that are open to debate. Asking open ended questions with this species will be more fun than giving the kids theories. What do you think the spines were used for and what do you think those whips are all about? The kids will guide the presentation about Stethacanthus. While we wont be adding any additional Cladodont fossils any time soon, I do hope to add either Caseodus or Campodus to our collection before the end of spring. I like the Eugeneodontids as artistic subjects for my son so we will pick up more of these fossils as we progress. Our presentation fossils Pic 1- Edestus heinrichi. This is an Illinois coal mine fossil, dated to between 360-320 mya. Another personal favorite. These are not common and it is pretty cool to be able to show this one to students. Pic 2- Listracanthus. A "feather" denticle from the Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian in Iowa. Not the best example as it is difficult to see but a good photograph will help. Still it is cool just to have the Feather Shark in the program ! Pic 3- Stethacanthus altonesis. One of the two teeth we have from the Caney Shale Formation in Oklahoma. Again, it is just too cool to have Stethacanthus fossils. I do not know how rare they are or anything but it is just such a freaky little creature.
  25. My son and I are doing our first Shark Adaptation classroom education program in March. We are using fossils from across the timeline of sharks to explain to the students how sharks have managed to stick around this planet for some 430 or so million years. I am very proud of the relatively small fossil shark collection we have. The kids will get to see and in a lot of cases handle some fossils from badass sharks. I thought it would be fun to put some of that collection and bits of the information we present. Eventually I will include the art work my son is producing. He is 5 months away from graduating high school so I limit his time on this art while he works his final art projects for school. The first shark we cover is also one of the most fun for me. The Cladodont sharks are pretty cool and as I recently learned present a perfect opportunity to utilize them in two different spots in our presentation. They start off the program because of Cladoselache. They were not the first shark but they are the basic design for sharks that would be recognizable to 3rd and 4th grade students. They had body type that modern sharks use and they had some fearsome looking teeth. They may be really small teeth but they were deadly if you were a small fish. Science thought these little sharks went extinct during the Great Dying but in 2013 that theory was proven wrong. There were Cladodont teeth found in France that dated to 120 million years ago. They survived the Permian by moving to deeper waters. The small shallow water sharks apparently became very successful as smaller deep water sharks. The physical adaptations are important but the adaptive behavior of sharks is a huge part of how sharks have survived for so long. We only get a few minutes on each shark so that is the basic stuff we will tell the kiddos. Here are the teeth. Pic 1- the unidentified Cladodont tooth. I love this tooth. It is one of my favorites. Under the micro eye, it looks so freaking cool. It could be a Symmorium. It could be something else. It might even be something new. It is from Russia and dated to 320 million years. This will get donated for research at some point. Pic 2- Cladodus belifer. A Mississippian tooth from Biggsville Quarry in Illinois.
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