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Found 350 results

  1. We completed our first trade on the fossil forum recently and it was awesome. We got a great fossil and a cool new friend. I am putting up one of my Stethacanthus altonensis teeth because I want to bulk up our shark education program just a bit. It is really the only tooth we could trade that has much appeal. Here are the details on the teeth we have to offer. I actually think this one of our anvil shark teeth. This one is smaller but has the tip intact. The details Stethacanthus altonesis Delaware Creek Member-Caney Shale Formation Mississippian-Meremacian Pontotoc County, Oklahoma We can also offer some trade filler too but none of it rare or anything. PM if you want pictures of these teeth. 2 Isurus planus teeth from Sharktooth Hill Miocene 1 Ptychodus whippeli from Texas. i have no other information about the tooth. 1 Cretaceous Shark indet tooth from New Jersey ( I think). Scapnorhynchus was the leading opinion when it put it on the TFF for ID. It was not a unanimous opinion though. We are looking for specific things to fill in our education presentation about sharks. Astercanthus teeth and spine. Any Hybodont shark would work but in a perfect world we find an Astercanthus sp. Caseodus tooth Campodus tooth Cardabiodon tooth Feel free to say hello if you are interested. In pic 3, the trade tooth is on the right.
  2. Odd Shark Tooth

    Hey everyone, I found this tooth in the spoil piles at the Aurora fossil museum in NC a few years ago. It's been sitting on my desk for a while and I haven't gotten around to getting it ID'd on the forum, but there's no time like the present. I have no idea what it could be from, maybe a pathological Carcharhinus or Physogaleus? The root is about 2.5 cm wide and the overall length (measured by the blade angle) is about 2 cm.
  3. Hi all, I recently made a trip out to Wilson Clay Pit in Brownwood, Texas with my local paleo society. I've found several recognizable things, and a few I need some help identifying. I apologize in advance to @erose who gave me an idea on one bivalve that I failed to write down, and thereafter promptly forgot! I think the tooth is Petalodus sp., just need confirmation. I'd love a genus for the clams, and I have no idea at all what the small plate-shaped fossil is. Thanks!
  4. Tooth found in Wisconsin

    Okay, I found this tooth in Wisconsin. It was on the shore of an island that was land 90 years ago. Can anyone tell me if this is a shark tooth. The closest I can tell is its a mako, but all history books say that would be impossible. Maybe its reptile or some kind of gar, or maybe a even a mammal... Here is a video link.....and yes I'm a painter on break, hence the dirty hands lol.
  5. This was a prep I've last year, but for some reason I've never posted it on the forum. So I thought I might change that. Last year I was fortunate enough to take a visit to the Ernst Quarries and dig for some shark teeth. Although most of the fossil I've taken home are either bones, four partial regular-sized teeth, and mostly tiny partials (some of which I accidentally damaged while digging ), the biggest find of the day was this large Cosmopolitodus hastalis tooth with its crown partially sticking out of the matrix. When Rob noticed the tooth, he initially estimated it to be ~2 inches long and insisted that I keep the tooth in the matrix, saying something like "The tooth itself is worth about $15. If you keep the tooth in the matrix, it'll be worth $60". Although my reason for visiting the Ernst Quarries was to find shark teeth to keep rather than to sell, I for some reason decided to keep the tooth in the matrix. However, I still had to prep this baby when I got home! Below is the tooth how I found it. This was going to be my first (and so far only considerate) prep I've ever done. Rob told me that the matrix can easily be scratched away using a fingernail and so taking his words and some advice I've gotten from the forum regarding something else, I grabbed one of my mom's needles and started quite literally digging off the siltstone. After around 10 minutes, a perfect root base showed up. This tooth is obviously going to be a perfect whole, so you just gotta keep scraping off the matrix. One really helpful thing I've realized at this point is that the needle I was using was perfect for such beginner's prep- it was strong enough to remove matrix effectively but not enough to do any damage to the tooth itself.
  6. I am not sure what species this Cretaceous shark tooth belonged to. It comes from Kansas but I really do not have much more information. It is 2 cm on the slant. It is really a nice tooth and it was a bargain. My best guess is Archeolamna which I believe is found in the chalk in Kansas. I do not think it is robust enough to be Cardabiodon and I do not know what other species it would match from the area. Any help would be appreciated.
  7. Acrodus tooth

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 0.8 cm long Acrodus tooth with a nice structure ! Those are very common in some layers in the "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg) but bigger ones are quite rare. Another picture:
  8. Hello, If you have seen my prior posts, it would appear I'm on a lucky streak... I found the blade of this sharks tooth at the fleet, Weymouth It is from the middle Oxford Clay (Upper callovian) - specifically the Q. Lamberti/ C. scarburgense subzone bondary I believe it is Sphenodus longidens, though it is hard to tell without the root! Any help or thoughts would be much appreciated Cheers, Jacob.
  9. What shark tooth is this

    Found this shark tooth in Apollo bay Victoria Australia any ideas on what it is?
  10. RNC 0200 (a) (Shark Tooth).jpg

    From the album Lebanese Fossils

  11. Pre-apologies for the picture, it is rather small and doesn't pick up well on my camera... Nonetheless, can anyone help identify this tooth? I have the name on the tip of my tongue, but my books are not with me to help identify it...
  12. I found this and i have been trying to find out what it is. Is there anyone that can help me out?
  13. Did I find a partial Edestus tooth ?

    I was given a jar of fossil shark teeth by a friend who knows I use them in education. These were collected on beaches in Florida but some of unknown origin seemed to be mixed in with the lemon, dusky, and sand tiger teeth. As I went through the teeth, one really jumped out as soon as I saw it. It did not look like the rest of teeth and it looked very similar to the Edestus tooth I have in my collection. I can not say for sure but I honestly can not think of anything else it is. In the pictures, the top tooth is my Edestus. The bottom is the partial that appears to be an edestus. Anybody have an opinion on this ?
  14. One of my nice Lee creek mako teeth were sitting in one of my pockets with a few Hershey's chocolates with paper wrappers (don't ask why I was pretty hungry). after I ate them all, I looked at my tooth, and to my dismay saw that what looked like the ink from the wrappers had rubbed onto the root. Aside from the weird story, I have tried using a toothbrush with soap and water, to no avail. What would be the best way to get rid of the stain? I have attached before and after pics below. I know there are a few lighting differences, so I also put it aside one of my other lee creek makos that used to be a similar color as a reference to the darkness of the stain. Thanks.
  15. Shark tooth fossil

    I found this fossil yesterday and I am trying to identify to which shark species it belongs. Can anyone help? Fort Pickens, Fla .
  16. UPDATE: Object with Embedded Shark Tooth!

    Hi all, I am thrilled to bring you an update on the object I posted not too long ago in the Fossil ID section. As advised, I brought it to the Calvert Marine Museum to be examined by expert eyes, but unfortunately the paleontology staff was not at the museum when I arrived, so I left the fossil with them along with my contact information and details about the location and age of the fossil. This was a few weeks ago. I just recently received a voicemail from the museum staff notifying me that an expert on marine mammals had taken a look at the fossil and rather easily recognized it as a dolphin periotic, a bone in the ear! When I called back and asked about the shark tooth that was buried in the bone, they said he must've missed that (I don't blame him; it's a small tooth!), but I asked if it would've been a result of feeding. They confirmed that the tooth undoubtedly wound up in the bone when a shark bit into the animal, but suggested that it is much more likely that it was a result of scavenging, not hunting. Because of the size of the tooth especially, it is most reasonable to conclude that a small shark scavenged the remains of the dolphin after it died, as a shark of that size typically would not pursue such large prey. Regardless, I think it's a spectacular find and it's certainly one of my favorite in my collection. A huge thank you to the experts at the CMM for their unparalleled expertise and willingness to help out an amateur. I'm very happy with my find, and can't wait to go pick it up next time I'm in the area. Thanks for reading this update! ~David (p.s. below is a picture of the fossil that I posted on the original ID thread. I'll post more detailed pictures once I pick it up from the museum)
  17. I will be going to Deland Florida in a couple of weeks. Never been there before, just going for a quick 3 day trip to introduce my grandmother to her new great grandson. I'm hoping to be able to sneak out quick to look for some shark teeth while I`m down there. Looking for suggestions of where I can find shark teeth in that area... Thanks!
  18. New sites

    I have always looked for shark teeth on folly and Morris island in Charleston SC and I've had very good luck on Morris but I have not found a whole meg yet just broken pieces. I want to expand my sites and start looking in creeks and rivers but I do not know where to start researching good sites. Everytime I Google a spot though I do not get much information. Any advice on places to start?
  19. Worn Cow Shark Symphyseal

    Hi all, This tooth was found of one of my recent hunts along the Calvert Cliffs in Maryland. I found it at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach. It is approximately one cm in length, relatively flat, and has multiple worn but visible bumps of enamel that could either be large serrations of some shark tooth or cusps of a symphyseal cow shark tooth. I believe it's the latter, but also recognize that it is a rather uncommon find. If it turns out to be a cow shark symphyseal, it would be my first one! Excited to see your takes on this one. I feel somewhat confident with my standing ID, but would love some confirmation. Thanks in advance!
  20. tooth ID?

    Found near calvert cliffs in MD.
  21. Yesterday (January 2nd) was only my second trip to Calvert Cliffs. I'm pretty new to fossil collecting, but thanks to the wonderful advice and reading the greatly informative posts from members such as @Darktooth @FossilsAnonymous @WhodamanHD @racerzeke @KimTexan and @paxhunter I had a lot of success and it was a much more productive trip than my first. Below is a brief summary and some pictures of what I found: I woke up, put on a few layers clothing, and had my coffee at 3:45am. After my morning pipe (tobacco...I actually make briar tobacco pipes as a hobby) I got in my pre-loaded truck and headed south at 4:45am. I made good time on the drive down as I hit 695 and got around Baltimore before the morning rush. At 7:10am I arrived at Brownies Beach and pulled in to a parking lot with only two other cars in it. After putting on my full waders, I grabbed my sifter and headed towards the beach. I planned this trip so that I could arrive midweek and get there early enough to catch some of the low tide (tides times were not friendly this week, but I start teaching classes next week so it was this week or wait until spring). Sunrise was at 7:24, but there was more than enough light to see...and what a sight it was. When I entered the beach area the tide was way, way out. I couldn't believe how far out it was, as it was past two small sandbars (if I get my GoPro video edited I will post it). Once I was on the beach I headed south towards the cliffs. I hurried through the beach area because I wanted to be by the cliffs with the tide so low. I know I missed teeth along the beach, but I wanted to get to the cliffs with the tide being so far out where I could hopefully find some larger teeth than what are common at the beach area. As I neared the end of the beach I ran into one woman who was there just to relax and walk on the beach. We said good morning and I knew who one of the two cars in the parking lot belonged to. Once I went around the point and turned my eyes close to shell line and started looking. Because of all the wonderful advice from this forum I had a much better idea of what I was looking for and how to best look. After a few minutes I had some ray plates, very small teeth, and my first ever vert. It wasn't even 7:30 and I knew it was going to be a good day. As I made my way down the shore line that I figured had been pretty well picked over from people being off over the holidays, I remembered a forum member saying 'you need to look in the places that others don't'. I approached a fallen tree that I remembered from my first trip a few weeks ago, and with the tide being so low almost the entire tree was exposed so I got down on my hands and knees and started looking at some of the gaps between the tree and sand...then it happened. You know when you day dream and picture yourself finding a great tooth or fossil? Well that's what happened as my eyes saw a pristine Mako just laying there (pictures below). I know its not a huge tooth or a meg, but to me being new to the hobby this was completely awesome and a trip maker. I think I still have a smile on my face from finding it. As I continued down the beach I collected many more teeth from various sharks. I couldn't believe it when I found an awesome cow shark tooth (my second trip maker) laying out in the open about 8 feet up the beach. Beside it was another good tooth as well that went in my pouch. Around 10:30 I ran into a very friendly gentleman and we chatted a bit. We talked about the weather and the cliffs, what he had found (a few hemis), and he told me a story of a fall he had witnessed a few years ago that was too close for comfort. A chunk of clay the size of a car fell and nearly crushed him, but luckily he heard some soil falling and he ran straight out into the bay right before the cliff fell. Although the clay chunk did't hit him, the water threw him up into the air when the clay hit. His friend who was a down the cliffs said he heard it and it sounded like a car crash....I didn't get this gentleman's name but I feel like I read his cliff fall story on here, so if you know who it may have been please let me know. I continued south until the tide started coming in pretty far and I thought it best to head back towards the beach since I didn't know how far it would come in or how high the water would get. I continued my search along the way back and made it to my truck around 2pm. I took a short break, ditched my sifter, texted my wife, checked email, watched a truck with two high school kids pull in to smoke a pipe (although this one wasn't filled with tobacco), and headed back out for one more quick trip down and back as the tide started to go back out. It wasn't until about 3:30pm when two more local fossil collectors came up behind me and we said hello and chatted. All in all, I only ran into 3 other collectors during the day so there was not a lot of competition (although I do like the interesting conversation). After finding a few more teeth and interesting fossils dusk approached and I headed back to my truck. After putting my gear away and changing into some dry clothes I started my trek north after a fantastic start to 2019. Below are some pictures of my finds from the day. I know what many of the teeth and other fossils are, but if you can ID something that a newbie like me probably wouldn't know then please do so as it will help me get better with this hobby. Thanks!
  22. Shark tooth or rock?

    Anyone able to help identify? Went looking for shark teeth at Venice Beach, Florida this morning. Rock or tooth?
  23. Good day to everyone! Thought I’d share some the teeth found on Milnerton and Big Bay beach here in South Africa. Any help identifying would be appreciated - I’m still relatively new so the more worn and broken teeth have me clueless. More pictures to follow!
  24. Megalodon or Great White Tooth?

    This tooth was found in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. It measures to about 1.5 inches. The shape of the tooth was interesting and unlike what I had seen previously, so I asked around and was told it was most likely a tooth from a Megalodon, however I remained skeptical due to its size. I would like to know what animal this tooth came from. Thank you in advance.
  25. I found this one on a small piece of matrix with Blastoid also on it. Found in sulphur Indiana today
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