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Found 12 results

  1. Hi all, I was curious if anyone knew someone from a college or museum that I could contact to ask if they can I.D my associated shark vertebrae? TIA, have a great day!
  2. Shark or bony fish verts?

    How do you differ between bony fish vertebrae and shark vertebrae? What about these three vertebrae from Kiowa formation (Albian)? #1: approximately 5.5mm wide and 3mm thick. #2: approximately 5.5mm wide and 2.3mm thick. #3: approximately 4.8mm wide and 2.3mm thick.
  3. I'm quite used to finding small fish vertebra from these small sized fish coprolites @GeschWhat from the Oxford Clay of Peterborough. But this one below has more of a shark vertebra appearance, or are there different variations of fish vertebrae. All vertebrae measuring between 2 and 3 millimetres. This one below is also a fish vertebra.
  4. Shark Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shark Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sharks are a group of elasmobranch fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (or Selachii) and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term "shark" has also been used for extinct members of the subclass Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus, as well as other Chondrichthyes such as the holocephalid eugenedontidans. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date back to more than 420 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes
  5. Shark Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shark Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sharks are a group of elasmobranch fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (or Selachii) and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term "shark" has also been used for extinct members of the subclass Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus, as well as other Chondrichthyes such as the holocephalid eugenedontidans. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date back to more than 420 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes
  6. Shark Vertebrae a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shark Vertebrae SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sharks are a group of elasmobranch fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (or Selachii) and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term "shark" has also been used for extinct members of the subclass Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus, as well as other Chondrichthyes such as the holocephalid eugenedontidans. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date back to more than 420 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes
  7. Made another trip to the Sulphur and had a couple questions regarding two of my finds: First, is this coprolite? Not sure how to identify it, other then it looks like it. Second, I assumed this was a shark centrum when I found it, but looking at other images online, they are seem to be quite a bit thicker. Mine is about 2" in diameter and 1/4" thick. Any thoughts? Thanks!
  8. Shark vertebrae

    From the album Calvert Cliffs - 3/7/17

    Assortment of shark vertebrae.
  9. I see a large number of posts where the poster asks for id help with a fish vertebra. Most times a lot of information is given, but unfortunately not all of it is correct. There are bits and pieces of fish vertebrae id information in a number of books, papers, articles, websites etc. but nothing that I’ve seen that I would consider to be comprehensive. The below paper is a rather obscure one but which I’ve found extremely helpful with the id of extant shark vertebrae which also helps with the fossil ones: A Guide to Identifying Shark Centra from Southeastern Archaeological Sites Kozuch and Fitzgerald 1989 https://www.academia.edu/5653950/A_Guide_to_Identifying_Shark_Centra_from_Southeastern_Archaeological_Sites_Kozuch_and_Fitzgerald_1989?auto=download I have thousands of shark, ray, sawfish, and bony fish vertebrae but unfortunately I just don’t have the time to take pictures of them. I see all kinds of generalizations about the differences between these types of vertebrae that get included in fish vertebra id post replies that are just not universally true based upon my personal readings and collection. Below are a few generalizations from the above paper: If you are aware of other papers, articles, websites etc. that would help TFF members better understand these vertebrae could you please add links to them in replies to this post? Marco Sr.
  10. Vertebrae

    From the album Shark Teeth

    Small shark vertebrae found in Hogtowne Creek near 8th.
  11. I just bought a large shark vert. It's from a Otodus obliquus. It measures 3 3/8" at the widest point. I was wondering if a true size of this shark can be determined from the measurements of the vertebra? I know the vertebrae differs throughout the shark's body. But let's just say this was the largest vert. Any help is appreciated. Thanks! My uneducated guess: about 25'-30'.
  12. Shark vertebrae

    From the album new bakersfield finds

    This is one of two jackets of shark vertebrae found in the Sharktooth Hill area of Bakersfield, California. There are approx. 40 associated vertebrae contained in both jackets and this one is now on display at Buena Vista Museum in Bakersfield.
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