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Found 163 results

  1. Heres a fun thread for those to show off their widest and fattest looking megalodon teeth fossils in thier collections. I'll set the tone with the widest fat boy in my collection, I don't have digital calipers but it measure roughly 5.4 inches wide by 6.1 inches long. When I close my hand together it looks even more monstrous. Share yours and join the wide boyclub Got the idea while thinking about what the widest megalodon tooth ever found measures, if anyone does know do share in this thread!
  2. Shark Tooth Found

    I found this tooth at my normal overburden site, at work, it is the best shark tooth i have even found. Looking at Shark tooth I.D guides my guess is that this is a Auriculatus tooth. What do you all think?
  3. Sharks tooth ID: A Meg and a ????

    I know there is one for sure Meg... what is the smaller one??!! These are from central Florida.
  4. Receiving this gorgeous but mysterious specimen is from Upper Pennsylvanian limestone dated around 290-300 million years ago from somewhere around Kansas City. Looks like a tooth to me and my best guess would be orodus? But I have little experience with Pennsylvanian shark teeth in general and especially from this area, also cannot find a comparison elsewhere online. Any help will be appreciated.
  5. Cleaning a sharks tooth

    I wanted to show some photos of a tooth that cleaned up really well. This is a small tooth I found some time ago. Regardless of its size, the quality of the specimen was excellent. So I cleaned it and polished the enamel. I thought the difference was significant. My learning was that in some cases cleaning and polishing can greatly improve the looks of a specimen. Before the cleaning. Fresh out of the river After cleaning and polishing the enamel
  6. Sphyrna lewini.jpg

    From the album My collection of recent shark teeth

    Species: Sphyrna lewini (Scalloped hammerhead) Orgin: Spain (Atlantic ocean) (general) body length: 1,5-4,3m Diving depth: ≤1000m
  7. Somniosus microcephalus.jpg

    From the album My collection of recent shark teeth

    Species: Somniosus microcephalus (Greenland shark) Orgin: Island (Atlantic ocean) (general) body length: 4-8m Diving depth: ≤3000m
  8. Hexanchus griseus.jpg

    From the album My collection of recent shark teeth

    Species: Hexanchus griseus (Bluntnose sixgill shark) Orgin: Madagascar (Indic ocean) (general) body length: 6m Diving depth: ≤2500m
  9. Galeocerdo cuvier.jpg

    From the album My collection of recent shark teeth

    Species: Galeocerdo cuvier (Tiger shark) Orgin: Philippines (Pacific ocean) (general) body length: 5-6m Diving depth: ≤900m
  10. Need help on these small fossils.

    I found an old box of fossils I had when I was a kid. I dont remember where I got it from but I would appreciate it if someone can I.D the shark teeth from or or the brachiopod.
  11. I have some teeth from Cognac area to ID. Selachians found are Parvodus, Polyacrodus, Lissodus, Hybodus, Hybodontidae, Rhinobatidae but I don't know them. Is someone knows this fauna ? Here are 4 pics done with my phone, but perhaps I have to try with an APN... They are very very small. It is written "Portlandian" on the pics but the right stage is Berriasian. I think I have 2 different species in my collection, and I must do a lot of pics Thanks for you help. Coco
  12. Big Brook!

    I took a vacation to NYC (and in good time too, since everything is going to hell in a handbasket) and on one day i went to big brook! I wore a full set of waders and crawled up, around, over, and through Big Brook for about 6 hours. It was great! I will definitely go back! Man, that site has some of the most convincing concretions i have ever seen, and i have seen a LOT! I know what much of i found was, but some is a definite mystery.
  13. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  14. Today was not only a leap day but it was the 10th anniversary of the Gateway Science Museum. We were invited to take part in the festivities and provide an activity. We decided to bring some fossils that folks might not associate with leaping or jumping. We tied the leaping theme together with our fossils and talked sharks, whales, avian dinos, non-avian dinos, and marine mammals. The Cetaceans stole the show but people were digging the breaching sharks too. I was often busy with double duty, I’m a supervisor at the Gateway, so Carter took the lead. He absolutely nailed it. Proud dad today watching my kiddo be the MAN for Fossils on Wheels. Fun day and a great day for Carter. Good job kiddo.
  15. I am in NYC for 5 days at the beginning of March, and I intend on taking at least one of those days to go find some fossils somewhere. I have nerded out pretty hard and crossreferenced localities etc and I have basically narrowed it to Big Brook, Shark River, or trilobites. I would love opinions on where the collecting would be best between Shark River and Big Brook (I have a bunch of Miocene shark teeth from California but absolutely nothing from the Cretaceous). I have some trilobites from California (white mountains) but nothing particularly special. Any and all suggestions will be considered! I have no problems wading horribly cold rivers or banging open limestone as necessary. About me: I am a medically retired field/remediation paleontologist from California, so while i *taught* invert paleo at university, I spent most of my time chasing construction vehicles for Pleistocene megafauna. I have a pickup truck and am always ready to travel... but I moved to New Hampshire where there are ZERO FOSSILS AT ALL.
  16. Amazing day yesterday! @sharkdoctor and I spent all day at the Calvert Marine Museum’s collection sorting through and cataloging pieces of his collection either loaned or donated to the Museum. When I say amazing fossils, I mean it. Crabs, birds, whale material, possibly a new species of seal, teeth, turtle plates, and more. @sharkdoctoris a really cool guy because he focuses all on adding to science and not just trying to grow his own collection. Plus, he’s so informative! After completing the cataloging of his collection we proceeded to catalog some of Bretton Kent’s world class shark tooth collection. The incredible John Nance took us through the museums archives, showing us the only Hexanchus from Calvert, 3 inch makos, Gomphothere Teeth, rare species of shark, a whole crocodile, and other innumerable fossils that would be any collectors dream to have. Thank you John Nance, @sharkdoctorand the whole fossil community for building this up.
  17. Polyacrodus

    Out of over 17,000 teeth pulled out of ant hills in north central New Mexico, I came up with this one isolated tooth. There are a scattering of other hybodontids in the fauna, but this is the only one of this kind. I originally thought this was Polyacrodus parvidens, but upon getting into the literature I have discovered that this species has a high central cusp and the ornamentation isn't as strong as that on this tooth. So now I am leaning to P. cf. brevicostatus, and if this is the case, would be one of the first examples from this state. Any ideas from all of the distinguished people on the Forum?
  18. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 5

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  19. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 4

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  20. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 3

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  21. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 2

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  22. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 1

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  23. Otodus obliquus??

    In your opinion, these teeth are of an Otodus Obliquus
  24. Ciao, puoi classificarmi questi denti di squalo, sono fossili delle cave di fosfato di Oued-Zem in Marocco, grazie. (Hi, can you classify for me these shark teeth, they are fossils from the phosphate quarries of Oued-Zem in Morocco, thanks.)
  25. Dear Guys, During the last several years i detected unknown truth talking about Lithuanian boulders- the Carboniferous and Permian marine rocks are very numerous and their age is various- there can be found almost each stage of Carboniferous and Permian. The main rock types are three- dolomite and limestone with masses of brachiopods that is various in color, stromatolite limestone with mollusks and unidentified cephalon like fossils, and the last- lacustrine limestone with coelacanth scales and possible plant remains (Carboniferous rhabdodermatids are very numerous). Carboniferous period and Early- Middle Permian was not known in Lithuanian glacial boulders so I very need the strong expert, especially who works on Carboniferous- Permian brachiopods. If my age determinations are correct then I will write the scientific book about this discovery and i think there is huge possibility that many of these boulders could be transported by someone glaciation from Northwestern Russia (or Northern Ural) because there are big areas of Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic rocks near surface and Northern mountains potentially could be the cold center at some glaciation period in the Pleistocene. I will show all the pictures with fossil identifications and size, maybe someone will tell the opinion about the taxon and age possibilities. Any contact detail or other important information is very welcome! First image- Angiospirifer (Late Carboniferous), 1.1 cm length Second image- Anthracospirifer (Middle- Late Carboniferous), 1.8 cm length third image- Archaeocidaridae sea urchin plates (Carboniferous), 5- 8 mm diameter Fourth image- unidentified brachiopod species from Carboniferous- Early Permian (8 mm- 1 cm length) Fifth image- Atomodesma? bivalves from Kungurian boulder with Waagenoconcha brachiopod (1.7- 2.3 cm length)
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