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Found 152 results

  1. Big Brook!

    I took a vacation to NYC (and in good time too, since everything is going to hell in a handbasket) and on one day i went to big brook! I wore a full set of waders and crawled up, around, over, and through Big Brook for about 6 hours. It was great! I will definitely go back! Man, that site has some of the most convincing concretions i have ever seen, and i have seen a LOT! I know what much of i found was, but some is a definite mystery.
  2. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  3. Today was not only a leap day but it was the 10th anniversary of the Gateway Science Museum. We were invited to take part in the festivities and provide an activity. We decided to bring some fossils that folks might not associate with leaping or jumping. We tied the leaping theme together with our fossils and talked sharks, whales, avian dinos, non-avian dinos, and marine mammals. The Cetaceans stole the show but people were digging the breaching sharks too. I was often busy with double duty, I’m a supervisor at the Gateway, so Carter took the lead. He absolutely nailed it. Proud dad today watching my kiddo be the MAN for Fossils on Wheels. Fun day and a great day for Carter. Good job kiddo.
  4. I am in NYC for 5 days at the beginning of March, and I intend on taking at least one of those days to go find some fossils somewhere. I have nerded out pretty hard and crossreferenced localities etc and I have basically narrowed it to Big Brook, Shark River, or trilobites. I would love opinions on where the collecting would be best between Shark River and Big Brook (I have a bunch of Miocene shark teeth from California but absolutely nothing from the Cretaceous). I have some trilobites from California (white mountains) but nothing particularly special. Any and all suggestions will be considered! I have no problems wading horribly cold rivers or banging open limestone as necessary. About me: I am a medically retired field/remediation paleontologist from California, so while i *taught* invert paleo at university, I spent most of my time chasing construction vehicles for Pleistocene megafauna. I have a pickup truck and am always ready to travel... but I moved to New Hampshire where there are ZERO FOSSILS AT ALL.
  5. Amazing day yesterday! @sharkdoctor and I spent all day at the Calvert Marine Museum’s collection sorting through and cataloging pieces of his collection either loaned or donated to the Museum. When I say amazing fossils, I mean it. Crabs, birds, whale material, possibly a new species of seal, teeth, turtle plates, and more. @sharkdoctoris a really cool guy because he focuses all on adding to science and not just trying to grow his own collection. Plus, he’s so informative! After completing the cataloging of his collection we proceeded to catalog some of Bretton Kent’s world class shark tooth collection. The incredible John Nance took us through the museums archives, showing us the only Hexanchus from Calvert, 3 inch makos, Gomphothere Teeth, rare species of shark, a whole crocodile, and other innumerable fossils that would be any collectors dream to have. Thank you John Nance, @sharkdoctorand the whole fossil community for building this up.
  6. Polyacrodus

    Out of over 17,000 teeth pulled out of ant hills in north central New Mexico, I came up with this one isolated tooth. There are a scattering of other hybodontids in the fauna, but this is the only one of this kind. I originally thought this was Polyacrodus parvidens, but upon getting into the literature I have discovered that this species has a high central cusp and the ornamentation isn't as strong as that on this tooth. So now I am leaning to P. cf. brevicostatus, and if this is the case, would be one of the first examples from this state. Any ideas from all of the distinguished people on the Forum?
  7. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 5

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  8. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 4

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  9. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 3

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  10. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 2

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  11. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 1

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  12. Otodus obliquus??

    In your opinion, these teeth are of an Otodus Obliquus
  13. Ciao, puoi classificarmi questi denti di squalo, sono fossili delle cave di fosfato di Oued-Zem in Marocco, grazie. (Hi, can you classify for me these shark teeth, they are fossils from the phosphate quarries of Oued-Zem in Morocco, thanks.)
  14. Dear Guys, During the last several years i detected unknown truth talking about Lithuanian boulders- the Carboniferous and Permian marine rocks are very numerous and their age is various- there can be found almost each stage of Carboniferous and Permian. The main rock types are three- dolomite and limestone with masses of brachiopods that is various in color, stromatolite limestone with mollusks and unidentified cephalon like fossils, and the last- lacustrine limestone with coelacanth scales and possible plant remains (Carboniferous rhabdodermatids are very numerous). Carboniferous period and Early- Middle Permian was not known in Lithuanian glacial boulders so I very need the strong expert, especially who works on Carboniferous- Permian brachiopods. If my age determinations are correct then I will write the scientific book about this discovery and i think there is huge possibility that many of these boulders could be transported by someone glaciation from Northwestern Russia (or Northern Ural) because there are big areas of Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic rocks near surface and Northern mountains potentially could be the cold center at some glaciation period in the Pleistocene. I will show all the pictures with fossil identifications and size, maybe someone will tell the opinion about the taxon and age possibilities. Any contact detail or other important information is very welcome! First image- Angiospirifer (Late Carboniferous), 1.1 cm length Second image- Anthracospirifer (Middle- Late Carboniferous), 1.8 cm length third image- Archaeocidaridae sea urchin plates (Carboniferous), 5- 8 mm diameter Fourth image- unidentified brachiopod species from Carboniferous- Early Permian (8 mm- 1 cm length) Fifth image- Atomodesma? bivalves from Kungurian boulder with Waagenoconcha brachiopod (1.7- 2.3 cm length)
  15. Hey guys, I live in south Florida and I have been trying to find good locations to hunt for fossilized sharks teeth. I have gone to peace river with my boyfriend before, but we want to try and look for locations that would be closer to us . Please please please help!
  16. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. In this initial framework, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like "conspicuous horn corals," purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential etc. Got additions/amendments? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you for your insight and assistance.....
  17. A profusion of sharks teeth

    Some things get my attention. In this case it is the word "profusion" that gets my attention. The question is are they larger than 1/4"
  18. I bought a new old cabinet last winter and spent several months filling it with newly labeled specimens, most of them now stored in jewelry boxes. I took photos of it to show Tim, Fossildude19 and he suggested I post them in the Members Collections section. I followed his suggestion. The collection started in 2011 with a few fossil purchases off a well known public auction site. By the early spring of 2012 I was collecting in the field and the vast majority of my collection was self collected in that manner from sites, primarily in the Northeast and Ohio Valley as well as ones collected on trips to Texas, Germany and out west. There are also some gift specimens that I own thanks to the generosity of a number of friends, most of whom are on the Forum. The top of the cabinet is occupied by miscellaneous specimens, some that wouldn't fit in the drawers, some slated to be in a glass display case I hope to eventually get, and my collection of fossils found in New Jersey just above the Iridium Layer.
  19. Work on Hell Creek Display Begins

    It has taken 10 and a half months but I can finally start putting together our large display of the Hell Creek Fauna. I am really quite excited to start putting it together. We have a pretty good cross section of critters and I think it will be an excellent display to show the diversity of the formation. I also think this will be a great display to use as we explain how different animals share an ecosystem which is a science standard we want to get into more with the 2nd and 3rd grade students. I delayed starting this until we had tracked won three key fossils we were missing, Leptoceratops, Pachycephalosaurus, and Denversaurus. Those three have all gotten crossed off the list in the last month or so with the final domino being Denversaurus. We are still missing a Pectinodon tooth but we can add that down the road. I think now is the time to put it together so we can use this display for our presentation in Paradise which comes shortly after the year anniversary of the Camp Fire which burned the city down. It is a special program at the newly rebuild elementary school I will add some pictures of all the fossils in their individual displays later and once it is all living in one display. I am really proud of this one and I want to give a huge thanks to @Troodon who helped us immensely with this formation. Here is the Denversaurus tooth that I just picked up. A pretty nice tooth and a decent price at that. Today has been a good day for us as this is the one we needed to finish this up right !
  20. Sand Tiger Shark Tooth from Calvert Cliffs

    From the album Tertiary

    Carcharias sp. Sand Tiger Shark Tooth Miocene Calvert Formation Calvert Cliffs Bayfront Park Chesapeake Beach, MD.
  21. Otodus from the Aquia Formation, Maryland

    From the album Tertiary

    Otodus obliquus Mackerel Shark Tooth Paleocene Aquia Formation Douglas Point Charles Co., MD.
  22. From the album Tertiary

    Shark Vertebra Paleocene Aquia Formation Douglas Point Charles Co., MD.
  23. From the album Cretaceous

    Ischyodus bifurcatus Ratfish Jaw Piece (2.75 inches long) Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Willow Brook Holmdel, N.J.
  24. Hey guys I’m driving back from Panama City to Orlando Florida on Tuesday for work and wanted to ask if anyone has any suggestions for a spot I could stop off at on my drive home to go look for teeth or other fossils. Need to scratch that fossil itch. Land sites are probably my best bet for the hour I’ll have but I could stop by a river. Any suggestions would help. I’m obviously not asking for major spots as I also keep mine secret. Love to here from you guys.
  25. It is becoming to Fossils on Wheels tradition to do a program way ahead of schedule lol I just booked our first marine mammal themed program This is about 5 months before I thought we would be ready but we do not turn down opportunities to do our thing in a classroom. The program is a look at the Miocene featuring marine mammal and shark fossils. We have just enough fossil material to touch on the West and East Coasts of the United States during this time. In fact, we have just enough material to do the program at all but we did this with dinosaurs last year and it worked out just fine. I am really quite excited to talk about marine mammals. This is something I wanted to do last spring but we figured Dinosaurs would be the program that got us attention. Now we can have a little fun and expand on what we can already do quite well. Carter and I can follow the same formula of scientific information enhanced with touch fossils. We have some cool material from STH including some nice touch fossils, a couple of decent Cetacean pieces from the East Coast and shark fossils. We may not have all the fossils that I would want to do this with but I think we have enough to give the kiddos a really great hands-on experience. We can explore some interesting Cetacean adaptations such as echolocation, intelligence, communication, and migration. We can discuss the different feeding styles of whales and why they super-sized themselves. We can balance these adaptations with shark adaptations and fun facts about evolution and theories regarding the extinction of Megalodon. This also gives a chance to really get into the fauna of Sharktooth Hill. I grew up a few hours from STH and it remains the only formation I have collected in personally. We use a number of sharks from STH in the shark program but this is different. We will focus on it while touching on the East Coast of the US. I am pretty excited to get into detail about a really cool part of the natural history of California with our local kiddos. It is going to be fun and I feel pretty confident that we can pull this one off. I have three weeks to work on the presentation plus the kids will get free fossils which helps. I will be nervous like I was when we debuted the dinos but that is not a bad thing. It drove me to make sure we did our absolute best in every presentation. I am excited and will update TFF on the how well this one is received since there are so many STH collectors on the here !!
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