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Found 12 results

  1. First trip to Centralia, PA

    I had my first taste of the Carboniferous period. I made the trip to Centralia PA for a look at the fossils there. I went to coal deposit up the road from the cemetery on 2nd street ( pic below ). Centralia was not a "ghost town" not when I was there. There was a lot of people around. Many looked like they where their for the Graffiti Highway and other for some kind of four wheel event across the street from the spot I was at. The Shale was very soft and I had a hard time picking up anything bigger than 2 inches. I pulled away 3 layer but still had the same problem. I don't know if it would be them same if a kept going. Over all the sit was easy to find, and had a good view. With many fossil to pick from.
  2. Fossil ID? Yesterday's find...

    I found this in a stream bed yesterday in Preston County, WV. There are several tree fossils in the area, but this is my first significant find in this location. It was sitting in the bank erosion/water line of the stream. From my amateur sleuthing, I found similar pictures of sigillaria fossils. Not the typical bark pattern though. Thoughts?
  3. Coal shale Pennsylvania fossil

    Hello and thank you for your input. This slab is 20" x 15" and has a folded, what I believe to be a sigillaria leaf that is about 30" long. I am not sure though? I have color changed one of the photos so you can see the specimen in the center.
  4. Sigillaria?

    Korkinsky Coal Mine/ Chelyabinsk region/ Russia
  5. Short hunt in Donetsk

    View of the site Sigillaria Stigmaria Calamites node Calamites goepperty Cordaites leaf and some alive species
  6. Sigillaria Tree Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sigillaria Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Sigillaria is a genus of extinct, spore-bearing, arborescent (tree-like) plants. It was a lycopodiophyte, and is related to the lycopsids, or club-mosses, but even more closely to quillworts, as was its associate Lepidodendron. This genus is known in the fossil records from the Late Carboniferous period but dwindled to extinction in the early Permian period (age range: from 383.7 to 254.0 million years ago). Fossils are found in United States, Canada, China, Korea, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Sigillariaceae Genus: †Sigillaria
  7. Sigillaria Tree Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sigillaria Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Sigillaria is a genus of extinct, spore-bearing, arborescent (tree-like) plants. It was a lycopodiophyte, and is related to the lycopsids, or club-mosses, but even more closely to quillworts, as was its associate Lepidodendron. This genus is known in the fossil records from the Late Carboniferous period but dwindled to extinction in the early Permian period (age range: from 383.7 to 254.0 million years ago). Fossils are found in United States, Canada, China, Korea, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Sigillariaceae Genus: †Sigillaria
  8. Sigillaria sp. (Brongiart 1822)

    From the album Plantae

    Imprint of a stem. From the late Carboniferous Westfalian at Calonne-Ricouart, France. Recieved on a trade with Gery (Nala)
  9. Stigmaria Ficoides

    Would anyone have any sort of idea of how much this Stigmaria fossil might be worth? It is approximately 12 in. x 6 in., I do not know where it originally is from. It was found within the landscape rocks of my sisters house, which is in southwest Ohio. From what I know of these, they are Carboniferous and not typically found around here, since most of the fossils found here (Cincinnati, OH) are usually Ordovician. I was thinking this stigmaria might have been transported with rocks from a quarry for landscaping purposes. The house is over 50 years old, so I have no way of knowing where the rocks came from. I was thinking of offering my brother in law something for this fossilized tree root (He does not collect fossils by the way.) What would this stigmaria be worth to someone who collects fossils like me? Thanks to anyone who replies, your opinions will be appreciated.
  10. Among my first posts here was a piece that I initially thought was some kind of coral, but those who reviewed it thought it may have been Lepidodendron Stigmaria, although still puzzled by its appearance. After countless times of looking it up, I've yet to see any Lepidodendron fossils (root or not) that look quite like it. I was reading up on fossils again recently and came across another Pennsylvanian fossil (related to Lepidodendron) that, in my opinion, looks far more like my specimen. Do you guys think it may instead be Sigillaria? Attached are some examples. EDIT: Close-ups added later in topic (post #9). Edge close-ups in post #26.
  11. Dear Forum, All six of the following photographs show Sigillaria fossils. But what species? I know there are a couple of lycophyte specialists here on the forum, and any help with identification is much appreciated. All specimens were found in the Westphalian (Upper Carboniferous) of Belgium or the Netherlands. Scale bar = 1 cm (all images). So far we have: 1 S. mamillaris 2 S. 3 S. 4 S. 5 S. boblayi 6 S. tesselata Kind regards, Tim 1 2 3 4 5 6
  12. Here is one of my newer plant fossils from Poland. Sigillaria bardii sp. What is with the weird deformed part of the bark in the middle of the specimen? Can anyone elaborate? Is it the end of a growth cycle or somthing? Thanks, Peco
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