Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'silurian'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 221 results

  1. Hi, I am wondering what the white globular mineral growths are on this dolomitized Dawsonoceras mold. Calcite? Thanks for any help.
  2. Silurian blastoid

    I just relocated an unusual fossil that had been lost in some shoebox deposits. It appears to be a slightly crushed blastoid, but otherwise well preserved. It is pink colored and may be replaced with dolomite. I found it several years ago in Sumner County, TN at a place called South Tunnel. The site is a railroad cut exposing the Laurel Limestone and a few feet of Waldron Shale at the top, both middle Silurian in age. The rock had fallen out of the cut, but the extremely hard limestone looks like typical Laurel, a dolomitic limestone with very few fossils other than a few crinoid stem segments and the occasional brachiopod. I have been trying to identify it, but I'm not finding much info on Silurian blastoids. From my searches, there seems to be only one known blastoid species from the upper Laurel at St. Paul, Indiana, which is a Troostocrinus sp. Over several years of fossil hunting the area, I have never found anything even slightly similar in any Silurian deposits. Hoping someone here may have some idea what it is.
  3. Some type of coral?

    I found this specimen at Oaks Quarry Park in Fairborn Ohio. All of the rocks there were Silurian. In the 3rd picture at the top there are dolomite (or calcite) crystals. Any help would be much appreciated.
  4. Until I am able to start a Gallery Page I am going to fetaure some of my Waldron Shale specimens. Featured here is one of only a few known specimens of a complete Eucalyptocrinites crassus complete with root system. I collected this specimen near the type locality in Shelby County, Indiana. I prepared 90 percent of this specimen with some final matrix work being done by Scott Vergiels. Specimen measures 8 inches high.
  5. Silurian (Niagaran Series) 2 items

    I have two items on which I am requesting opinions. These are from a dolomitic nodule from the Schoolcraft Fm. in the upper peninsula of Michigan. The first one I think is a pygidium of the trilobite Scutellum. (note there appear to be some other trilo"bits" surrounding it). @piranha, what do you think? Here is an image from Ehlers (1973) Stratigraphy of the Niagaran Series of the Northern Peninsula of Michigan that he has as Scutellum laphami.
  6. Cotton Formation Fauna

    A few things from the Silurian (Llandovery) Cotton Formation near Forbes, NSW Australia. Most of these specimens are currently undescribed, but a paper will be released on them soon. One of my strophomenid brachiopods from the site will be in the paper, so I'll post it when it comes out, since they're a pain to photograph. The rare Aulacopleura pogsoni ....
  7. Aulacopleura pogsoni

    Paper describing A. pogsoni - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236011643_Early_Silurian_Llandovery_trilobites_from_the_Cotton_Formation_near_Forbes_New_South_Wales_Australia
  8. Hi, can anyone lead me on determining this species of brachiopod? This brachiopod originates from the Reynales Formation, Clinton Group of Hamilton, Ontario from the Niagara Escarpment. A name I found for this shell is Stricklandia canadensis when I was reading a document about the Escarpment, though when I went to the fossiilid.info and the fossilworks websites there is no mention of the species. I began to think this could be a Stricklandia lens. The shell in the centre is approximately 4 cm long.
  9. After going around in Hamilton, Ontario looking for a river/creek to check out the iconic Niagara Escarpment of the city, I decided to check out the Devil’s Punch Bowl which is located in Stoney Creek, Hamilton. Most of the waterfalls located in the old city of Hamilton are out of reach/barricaded/no-go zones with fines for trespassing because of safety reasons. Nearby Albion Falls and other waterfalls like Tiffany and Chedoke in the old city of Hamilton cannot be explored close up because of the tourists and locals that have died and severely injured themselves from falling while on the cascading waterfall. Today I was surprised to realize that the bottom of the Devil’s Punch Bowl was unbarricaded and so off I went to explore it. It seems the only place that tourists and people go to when visiting the Devil’s Punch Bowl is the observation deck at the top of the falls which offers a nice view of the falls. This is evident as I noticed that there was barely any trash at the bottom of the gorge and down river. The height of this falls is 37 metres. Today the fall is dry with no water. Theres a large Timmy’s cup on the bottom right for size comparison (it isn’t mine though!). There are various formation in this rock exposure of the falls and assigning loose rocks from the ground to the right formation can be a hassle.
  10. Silurian of Norway

    a recognized classic Indispensable! Worsley,Aarhus et al:The Silurian Succession of the Oslo Region NGU Bull.384,1983 ABOuT 7,5 MB NB: NO fossils are figured,the emphasis is on local correlation and stratigraphy
  11. Eurypterid-sea scorpion

    From the album Invertebrates and plants(& misc.)

    Eurypturus lacustris arthropoda chelicerata bertie Gr. Williamsville (A) Fm Buffalo, Western New York silurian
  12. Wenlock Weirdies.

    Hello, everybody! I have been sorting through my wenlock limestone material, Middle Silurian and have a couple of personal problematica. I am wondering if any of you brilliant folks could help me out. Here is an object which seems to be an epibiont on a Favosites coral. 5 mm long and about 1.5 mm diameter at the widest. Is it a cornulitid ? Or a single corallite of Aulopora? Something else, maybe? And another one? On a solitary rugose coral. 3 mm x 1 mm. And an example of Aulopora from Wiki to compare : And a cornulitid that looks a bit similar : I would be very grateful for any help. Then there is this. Is it the worm Keilorites? Length 1.9 cm, width 2.5 mm max.
  13. From the album Invertebrates

    Baltoeurypterus tetragonophthalmus (Fischer 1839) Silurian Smotrych River Kamianets-Podilskyi Ukraine
  14. Huge calymenid cephalon!

    I've been finding some very large calymenid cephala from my usual Liston Creek limestone spot. Today, i found the biggest one I've ever seen. Ive also noticed the rostrum is elongated in many of the ones ive found lately. They look quite a bit different from the calymenids I usually find at this spot. I need some help with the ID since I havent seen any like this before.
  15. Parking lot trilobite find

    There have been some great reports in the last week of folks hunting the Silurian and I wanted to add a report for my own serendipitous mini-trip from the last weekend. A few months ago, I had noticed a large pile of buff-colored stone dumped next to a retention pond in front of a local retail district. I thought they looked very similar to the Silurian dolomite I have seen and collected from elsewhere in Illinois, so I have been meaning to take a closer look. Last weekend I finally had some errands to run at Target with some free time on my hands, so I wandered over to the pile to check it out. In less than a minute I spotted a friendly face poking out of the corner of one piece of stone- Gravicalymene celebra! An iconic trilobite, and the biggest one I have found, with a cephalon just over 1 inch wide. It looks like it may be complete, although prep can be very difficult as @aek mentioned recently- at a minimum the cephalon appears to all be there. I looked around a little more and found a very poorly preserved cephalopod impression as well as one other rock with some intriguing shapes in it- it will need more prep though to say if it is anything. Since these were dumped next to a parking lot and there are no Silurian dolomite quarries within 60 miles, I can't say for sure what the source is. It seems likely to be the Racine or Joliet Dolomite of northeastern Illinois, though. I will definitely be returning when I have some free time and looking around some more- who knows, they may have used the same stone in other spots around the development!
  16. Recently I've been revisiting some local Silurian outcrops. I have a love/hate relationship with these outcrops as they are incredibly difficult to work with, however I secretly enjoy that aspect as well. The fossils represent the Homerian stage just before the Mulde Event, so roughly 422 - 426mya (if I'm not mistaken). For whatever reason, in the Racine formation, Gravicalymene celebra are almost always complete in the molting position and other species usually found disarticulated. The trick is extracting them without destroying them. Sometimes they are found enrolled, though much less common. I have only found two enrolled from this location over the past few years. 1) enrolled Calymene 2) Gravicalymene celebra 3) " 4) " 5) " 6) Sphaerexochus romingeri 7) Pentamerid brachiopod 8) favosites blastoid? 9) Dalmanitid pygidium 10) partial Dalmanites cephalon Close up snaps Sphaerexochus romingeri I believe this is a crinoid cup judging by the shape, but not sure. If anyone has any ideas... and the drum roll... Three species on one plate, Encrinurus pygidium, Dalmanites cephalon and a Calymene on the bottom . Unfortunately, due to the nature of the rock and my lowly prep skills, the only survivor is the Dalmanites. I somehow managed to restore both eyes with the original pieces for a nice "eye-popping" specimen. Thanks for looking . Also, in case you're curious, this entire collection is the result of four trips, not one. About 4-5hours per trip , so about 18-20 hours of collecting. and many more prepping. Cheers
  17. Silurian help

    Hi everybody. Recently a friend gave me silurian fossils, but not identified, and I'm not sure about the species. What do you think? Regards Juan
  18. trilobite ID

    Sooo about a month ago I bought this trilobite for $2 with free shipping from China, it just arrived and I'm hoping to get an ID or even if is real. Seller gives no info other than that is supposedly from the Silurian period and is also supposedly a coronocephalus part. It appears as if there is more than one individual. Can get more pics looks like two separate ones maaaaybe a piece of one here? Thanks
  19. I have a few decent-sized chunks of Desmogratus micronematodes, silurian graptolites from the Rochester shale. They're not super easy to come by, so I figured I would offer to share the wealth. Due to it being summer and me not presently receiving my teaching salary, I have to limit my trades to the US for the next two months, unless someone wants to pay for int'l shipping. Willing to entertain just about any offer, but will give preference to other uncommon material. Photo is an example, I have many pieces large and small. I can take photos of individual pieces based on potential trades!
  20. New Eurypterid fossils

    I went again to Lang's Quarry for the day to look for Eurypterids and associated fauna and had a very successful day with Mr Lang.
  21. I found the fossil below along the banks of the Muskegon River in Big Rapids, Michigan. All the pictures are different angles of the same fossil. I am hoping someone can identify it. The rock is about 2 inches in length (50 mm). I mostly find things from the Paleozoic era. Thanks in advance.
  22. Trilo Tail

    I stopped at a new spot - Mifflintown Formation [Silurian], I didn't pick up much but one that came home with me had this in it. It is the 1st Trilo that I have found in Blair county, though they are reported in the literature in several places. Is there enough here to make any further ID? it is tiny!
  23. I've wanted one of these Moroccan crinoid blocks for ages, so I couldn't turn this one down when I was able to get it for £10 ($13 US). All I had to go on were some poor quality images and I had no idea how big it was. (it's 10 inches across at the widest point). However, because I've never handled one of these before, or seen one in the flesh, I don't really know what to look for in terms of fakery, compositing or restoring. It does have a really horrible surface, making it look like plastic - I'm hoping this is just some sort of thick, ugly substance that has been applied to consolidate the surface, since it doesn't appear to be a cast. I'd be grateful for any opinions, or suggestions of what to look for. Sorry the photos aren't ideal - I tried it outdoors in natural light, and indoors with flash, but the horrible surface made it difficult to photograph well.
  24. I was browsing some photos of monograptids for sale and noticed in the corner of one of them a ghostly patch with some faintly marked bristles . Thinking it was probably a retiolitid , I bought it and it arrived yesterday. So it turned out to be which was pleasing as they're very interesting and beautiful and I haven't found any in the field yet. After wading through a fair bit of literature, I think it's probably Pseudoplegmatograptus obesus (Lapworth 1877), or something close (graptolites being frustratingly impossible to ID for non-specialists). (Mrs. @Spongy Joe ?) From Zdanow, Bardzkie Mountains, Poland. Sold as Wenlockian but I believe that should probably be Telychian (Upper Llandovery). Really tricky to photograph, the light has to be just right or it's near invisible, as in the first photo... The next three are taken with near overhead light and some digital tweaking. Scale bar is 1cm.
×