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Found 99 results

  1. Tremataspis schmidti ROHON, 1892

    Life reconstruction own work by Nobu Tamura Lit.: Robert H. Denison (1947): The exoskeleton of Tremataspis. Am. J. Sci. June 1, 1947 245:337-365; William Patten (1902): On the Structure and Classification of the Tremataspidæ. The American Naturalist Vol. 36, No. 425 (May, 1902), pp. 379-393
  2. Loganellia scotica, TRAQUAIR, 1898

    Pictures: Loganellia, swimming in a shallow sea 400 million years ago. From Wikipedia, own work of Darouet. Traquair's original reconstruction in dorsal view Lit.: Volume 16: Fossil Fishes of Great Britain. Chapter 2: Silurian fossil fishes sites of Scotland. Site: BIRK KNOWES (GCR ID: 359) Žigaite· Ž. & Goujet D. 2012. — New observations on the squamation patterns of articulated specimens of Loganellia scotica (Traquair, 1898) (Vertebrata: Thelodonti) from the Lower Silurian of Scotland. Geodiversitas 34 (2): 253-270.
  3. Last week, after checking the weather wunderground numerous times, I decided to drive 3.5 hours from Chicago to St. Paul Stone Quarry. It was the last "open house" day according to the ESCONI website. I arrived at 7:45, the first and only person there. Shortly thereafter, after a brief safety instruction, I followed the manager to the collecting site, heaps and heaps of Waldron shale. Even though I dressed in layers, I still had to take breaks and warm up in the car for a few minutes, but I much rather prefer collecting in cold weather as opposed to hot summer sun with mosquitoes, any day. It didn't take too long to start finding fossils. Here are just a few of my finds: Eospirifer Platystrophia brachiopods with pyrite Platyceras niagarense encrusted with strophomenid, bryozoa and pyrite. front: back: Partial Dalmanitid Trilobite in matrix When prepping, it's really wonderful how the waldron "butter" shale just crumbles apart around the predictable morphology of an enrolled trilobite. The trip just wouldn't seem complete without a short drive east to the Cincinnati Arch roadcuts. I first went to South Gate and found a flexicalymene eroding right out of the cut. It is interesting to see the comparisons here. The trilobite on the left is from St Paul (Silurian) and has beautiful pyritized eyes. The one on the right is from South Gate (Ordovician). Both trilobites have 21 articulated segments; does this make them both the same age as "adults"? Interesting to note the difference in size, being 40 million years apart, same species.. Thanks for looking!
  4. Birkenia elegans TRAQUAIR, 1899

    The Anaspida are classically regarded as the ancestors of lampreys. They were small marine agnathans (Greek, "no jaws") that lacked paired fins and often scales. They first appeared in the early Silurian and flourished until the late Devonian. Birkenia was a derived form of anapsid that grew to a maximum length of about 10cm. The Anaspids were simple dorso-laterally compressed fish that probably led a bottom-dwelling existence. It was adapted for active swimming and had a sucking mouth that was terminal rather than ventral. Birkenia has a characteristic row of anterior and posterior pointing dorsal scales. The gills opened as a row of holes along the side of the animal, typically numbering from 6-15. The tail is hypocercal which means that the lower lob is the longest. Traquair reconstructed Birkenia upside down because he never met this condition in a fish before. Many important collections of Silurian arthropods and vertebrates have been made near Lesmahagow since the mid to late 1800's. The Lesmahagow Inlier is a block of Silurian sediments surrounded by sediments of Carboniferous age. The inlier consists of shales and sandstones with occasional pebble conglomerates of a lagoon or lake. The sediments are thought to be of Llandovery (Silurian) age. This fish is from Slot Burn SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest), now off-limits to all collecting due to overzealous collecting. Lit.: D.L. Dineley: British fossil fish and amphibian sites, Chapter 1 GRC site account Slot Burn GRC site account Birk Knowes GRC site account Birkenhead Burn Henry C. Stetson, A Restoration of the Anaspid Birkenia elegans Traquair. The Journal of Geology, Vol. 36, No. 5 (Jul. - Aug., 1928), pp. 458-470
  5. Hi everyone, The only information I have for these dainty little fossils is : Silurian-Hughley Shale’s, Hughley, Salop, UK Any further help would be very much appreciated.
  6. Howellella elegan1d.jpg

    From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod A complete fossil Howellella elegans brachiopod which is approximately 425 million years old. Field Collection Place: Wenlock Limestone, Much Wenlock, UK Geological Complex: Howellella elegans Associated Period: Silurian - Wenlock

    © D&E

  7. Howellella elegan1c.jpg

    From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod A complete fossil Howellella elegans brachiopod which is approximately 425 million years old. Field Collection Place: Wenlock Limestone, Much Wenlock, UK Geological Complex: Howellella elegans Associated Period: Silurian - Wenlock

    © D&E

  8. Howellella elegan1b.jpg

    From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod A complete fossil Howellella elegans brachiopod which is approximately 425 million years old. Field Collection Place: Wenlock Limestone, Much Wenlock, UK Geological Complex: Howellella elegans Associated Period: Silurian - Wenlock

    © D&E

  9. Howellella elegan1a.jpg

    From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Brachiopod A complete fossil Howellella elegans brachiopod which is approximately 425 million years old. Field Collection Place: Wenlock Limestone, Much Wenlock, UK Geological Complex: Howellella elegans Associated Period: Silurian - Wenlock

    © D&E

  10. Gastropod-Bembexialloydi1b.jpg

    From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Gastropod Bembexia lloydi (Animalia, Invertebrata, Mollusca, Gastropoda) Description: Specimen of a fossil gastropod, Bembexia lloydi, collected from the Much Wenlock Limestone of Silurian, Wenlock, Homerian age from Shadwell Quarry, near Much Wenlock, Shropshire –a county located between West Midlands in England and Wales, UK. It is from the Silurian period (443 - 418 million years ago) Period: Silurian, Wenlock, Homerian, Much Wenlock Limestone Rock: Much Wenlock Limestone

    © D&E

  11. Gastropod-Bembexialloydi1a.jpg

    From the album Fossil in Matchboxes

    Gastropod Bembexia lloydi (Animalia, Invertebrata, Mollusca, Gastropoda) Description: Specimen of a fossil gastropod, Bembexia lloydi, collected from the Much Wenlock Limestone of Silurian, Wenlock, Homerian age from Shadwell Quarry, near Much Wenlock, Shropshire –a county located between West Midlands in England and Wales, UK. It is from the Silurian period (443 - 418 million years ago) Period: Silurian, Wenlock, Homerian, Much Wenlock Limestone Rock: Much Wenlock Limestone

    © D&E

  12. Tuesday, December 20th Wednesday, December 21st Thursday, December 22nd Friday, December 23rd
  13. Lit.: · Paul A. Selden (1981) Functional morphology of the prosoma of Baltoeurypterus tetragonophthalmus (Fischer)(Chelicerata: Eurypterida). Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: Earth Sciences, 72,9-48, 1981 Odd Erik Tetlie, A new Baltoeurypterus (Eurypterida: Chelicerata) from the Wenlock of Norway. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol. 82, pp. 37-44.Trondheim 2002. ISSN 029-196X. Volodymyr Grytsenko (1983) The Silurian of Podolia. The guide of excursion. Part.English text O. Erik Tetlie (2007): Distribution and dispersal history of Eurypterida (Chelicerata). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 252 (2007) 557–574 O. Erik Tetlie (2006): Two new Silurian species of EURYPTERUS (Chelicerata: Eurypterida) from Norway and Canada and the phylogeny of the genus. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 4(4): 397–412
  14. Trying to ID this cephalopod found in Silurian limestone in northern Illinois. My guess is it's a Spyroceras? In situ pic: Part of the cast glued together: Wavy lines in aquamarine colors and some pyritization/marcasite. I am clearly missing some pieces, but when fit together in the sarcophagus, it measures over 14". The entire cephalopod probably measured at least two feet or more, I'm guessing...
  15. St.Paul Indiana quarry open house

    until
    Quarry open house All times are local times 8:00am-2:45pm
  16. St.Paul, Indiana quarry open house

    until
    St.Paul quarry open house
  17. St.Paul Quarry Open House

    until
    St.Paul, Indiana quarry open house
  18. St.Paul quarry open house

    until
    Quarry open house All times are local times 8:00am-2:45pm
  19. Oeselaspis pustulata PATTEN, 1931

    Lit.: George M. Robertson (1935): Oeselaspis, a new genus of ostracoderm. Am J Sci May 1, 1935 Series 5 Vol. 29:453-461 Qu, Q., Blom, H., Sanchez, S. and Ahlberg, P. (2015): Three-dimensional virtual histology of Silurian osteostracan scales revealed by synchrotron radiation microtomography. J. Morphol.2015 Aug;276(8):873-88. doi: 10.1002/jmor.20386. Epub 2015 Mar 21.
  20. Hi, interested to hear some thoughts on this fossil found in Chicago. It was chiseled out of a large boulder containing Silurian reef material; rugose corals, gastropods, bryozoans, crinoids, etc... I'm guessing it is a form of stromapotoroids, but I'm not sure. Any ideas? Measures 2.5"
  21. Thyestes verrucosus Eichwald, 1854

    Lit.: Märss et al., (2014): Biodiversity of the Silurian osteostracans of the East Baltic. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Earth Sciences. 105, 2, pp. 73-148. Afanassieva & Märss, (1997): Exoskeleton Structure and the Distribution of Aestiaspis viitaensis (Agnatha) from the Silurian of Estonia. Paleontologicheski Zhurnal. 6, pp. 75-80. Afanassieva, O.B., (1985) Exoskeletal features of Thyestinae (Agnatha), Paleontol. Zh., 1985, no. 4, pp. 70–75. Afanassieva, O.B., (2014) Development of the Exoskeleton in osteostracans (Agnatha, Vertebrata): New Evidence of Growth. Paleontological Journal, 2014, Vol. 48, No. 9, pp. 973–979.
  22. The St.Paul stone quarry in Indiana will be allowing open collection on the following days. Be sure to wear pants, hard hat, and steel toe boots, however regular work boots are acceptable. Please arrive before 8am to sign liability wavers. Monday November. 21st Monday, November 28th Tuesday, November 29th Wednesday November 30th Best regards, Paul
  23. I found this fossil along the banks of Lake Michigan in NW Indiana. it is limestone chunk rock that was put there. The creature is a little over 4.5 inches long and about and 2 inches wide at it's widest point. The left side appears to be very round, like a scoop of ice cream sitting in a cone.. The zig-zag pattern is very pronounced. That's what caught my eye. Fossil NW Indiana by Mark Kasick, on Flickr
  24. Fossils like this are found in nodules of carbonate rock within the Forks formation here in Maine. This appears to be a small (1.5 cm) section of stem. What is the bell shaped structure surrounding it ? It seems to be segmented but of a different composition.