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Found 102 results

  1. Bones South Dakota

    Hello, A while ago I bought these 2 bones from South Dakota. The seller told me that it would be raptor, a vertebra and a femur. Can I get confirmation from somebody? Thank you
  2. Spring 2018 Dino Trip

    Anytime you can go collecting fossils its a good time and I would like to share my spring trip to South Dakota and Montana. My South Dakota site is in the upper Hell Creek Formation and full of the hadrosaur Edmontosaurus annectens. I've been collecting this site for over 20 years and its still delivering. We are on the edge of a bluff and the fossil layer can be between 2 to 4 feet. Lots of good bones are to be found but we also have lots of punky or junk bones and about 70 % is collectible. The site is quite large and like I said last year we have no idea of its size but it contains scores of hadrosaurs, all disarticulated. No skulls are found but all the elements that make up a skull can be found. I like collecting in the section where smaller bones, unguals-toe-carpal-verts, are more typical while others like to go after larger limb bones. My trip to these areas takes me through the Chile Capital of the World, Hatch, New Mexico. Greeting me is Mr Rex a good start to my trip. I hear he is harmless... all show no action Some pictures of the South Dakota site The collecting zone is between the white lines a layer of 2 to 4 feet. The layer is shown below. The top is very crumbly and full of concretions. My Collecting gear consists of a tool box with everything I need to collect My glue field consolidant, orange bottle, without strength but is easy to prep and my structural glue, red. Activator to accelerate curing which rarely used. Tips for the glue Basic Tools I like to use No its not a beach day but temperatures approaching 90 degrees (32C) can get pretty hot so some protection is needed
  3. So in late June early July my wife, 2 boys (8 & 2.5), my father in-law and mother-in-law and I are going to take a 2 week road trip around the US. We'll be leaving Maryland and heading down to Memphis, Tennessee followed by Nashville then on to Texas and ending up in Albuquerque, New Mexico at my brother-in-law's for a few days, then off to the Grand Canyon, up to Dinosaur National monument, over to Hot Springs, South Dakota to the Mammoth site, Mt Rushmore, and Crazy Horse Monument, then to the Badlands in South Dakota, and then start making our way back to home. We're taking some new paths and going back over some previous ones. I am interested in doing 1-2 hour fossil and/or rock and mineral collecting leg stretches not terribly far off US 40 between Memphis and Albuquerque. Honestly anywhere else near the places I listed and anywhere along US 90 back to Chicago and down to Indianapolis, then US 70 the rest of the way east towards home. I'm hoping if I ask on here I can get a handful of options for the trip, we may only do two or three depending on time, weather and general feedback from the rest of the family. I have messaged PFooley about the Albuquerque/Rio Puerco area. After we get back I will have to make a write up of the adventure, it should be a great trip full of geologic and paleontological fun. Thanks for any information, Adam
  4. Fossil ID (Coral?)

    Hi Everyone, This is my first time posting on any kind of fossil forum, and I was wondering if someone could help me ID something that was given to me years ago. Unfortunately I have pretty limited information, but a friend found this while motorcycling from Sturgis, SD back to Ohio. I think he said he found it along the road while still in SD, but it’s been so long I’m not sure. It’s 6.5in length and weighs about 3lbs. When tapped it almost has a ceramic sound in some places. The angle of this pic is looking down through the tubes (some of which you can see straight through). Some tubes are larger but most are 1/16in in diameter. A side angle would show that most of them are straight and run in the same direction, kind of like a bundle of straws. On the insides of the larger tubes, the walls are lined with even smaller tubes. I’ve been able to find one other pic of something similar (from northern Texas), but it was also unidentified. I thought it looked like coral or maybe even worms of some sort, but I don’t know much. Maybe it’s not even a fossil!
  5. Found in Northern South Dakota

    I apologize in advance for not taking more photos of this. My father in law found this by Shadehill Reservoir in Northern South Dakota. He would really like to know what it is. It is over a foot long and close to a foot wide at its widest point. It is close to 6 inches in height. I am not where it is now so these are approximate. Thanks in advance for any help.
  6. We got back out to the scapula jacket yesterday! The jacket we put on during a lull in the blizzard held exceptionally well. Fair weather for a change this time, the rancher had been joking about inviting us over whenever his land needed some rain (every time we've shown up before we've been rained our snowed out). We took our sweet time undercutting the jacket just to be on the safe side, then got it flipped and in the car in about an hour and a half of work.
  7. This was found near Custer Park in South Dakota. I know it is part of a jaw bone with a tooth in it but I cannot figure out what kind of mammal it might belong to. Can you help?
  8. geology question

    I was in an agate field in South Dakota just south of Badlands Park. Cretaceous era. I collected a few not-so-special agates and some jasper, and the pictured rock, which I thought was wind polished jasper- but it broke and had what looks to be brachiopods inside. I assume this is sedimentary or metamorphic. What is the relation between the agates in this region and the kind of specimen here? Why are there so many agate fields in this area of S Dak?
  9. Let's see what your "Best Deal" that you received on a fossil that you purchased. Over the years I received several great deals on fossils, here are two of my best. White River Oligocene 24" Lower Titanothere jaw with 2 partial teeth - about 20 years ago I purchased this jaw for $20.00. White River Oligocene Upper Titanothere Jaw portion with 3 complete teeth- at the same time of the above purchase, I also purchased this fossil for $10.00.
  10. Baculite Fossil Segment Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baculite Segment Fossil SITE LOCATION: South Dakota TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (66-145 Million Years ago) Data: Baculites ("walking stick rock") is an extinct genus of cephalopods with a nearly straight shell, included in the heteromorph ammonites. The genus, which lived worldwide throughout most of the Late Cretaceous, was named by Lamarck in 1799. The adult shell of Baculites is generally straight and may be either smooth or with sinuous striae or ribbing that typically slant dorso-ventrally forward. The aperture likewise slopes to the front and has a sinuous margin. The venter is narrowly rounded to acute while the dorsum is more broad. The juvenile shell, found at the apex, is coiled in one or two whorls and described as minute, about a centimeter in diameter. Adult Baculites ranged in size from about seven centimeters (Baculites larsoni) up to two meters in length. As with other ammonites, the shell consisted of a series of camerae, or chambers, that were connected to the animal by a narrow tube called a siphuncle by which gas content and thereby buoyancy could be regulated in the same manner as Nautilus does today. The chambers are separated by walls called septa. The line where each septum meets the outer shell is called the suture or suture line. Like other true ammonites, Baculites have intricate suture patterns on their shells that can be used to identify different species. One notable feature about Baculites is that the males may have been a third to a half the size of the females and may have had much lighter ribbing on the surface of the shell. The shell morphology of Baculites with slanted striations or ribbing, similarly slanted aperture, and more narrowly rounded to acute keel-like venter points to its having had a horizontal orientation in life as an adult. This same type of cross section is found in much earlier nautiloids such as Bassleroceras and Clitendoceras from the Ordovician period, which can be shown to have had a horizontal orientation. In spite of this, some researchers have concluded that Baculites lived in a vertical orientation, head hanging straight down, since lacking an apical counterweight, movement was largely restricted to that direction. More recent research, notably by Gerd Westermann, has reaffirmed that at least some Baculites species in fact lived in a more or less horizontal orientation. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Baculitidae Genus: †Baculites
  11. Baculite Fossil Segment Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Baculite Segment Fossil SITE LOCATION: South Dakota TIME PERIOD: Cretaceous Period (66-145 Million Years ago) Data: Baculites ("walking stick rock") is an extinct genus of cephalopods with a nearly straight shell, included in the heteromorph ammonites. The genus, which lived worldwide throughout most of the Late Cretaceous, was named by Lamarck in 1799. The adult shell of Baculites is generally straight and may be either smooth or with sinuous striae or ribbing that typically slant dorso-ventrally forward. The aperture likewise slopes to the front and has a sinuous margin. The venter is narrowly rounded to acute while the dorsum is more broad. The juvenile shell, found at the apex, is coiled in one or two whorls and described as minute, about a centimeter in diameter. Adult Baculites ranged in size from about seven centimeters (Baculites larsoni) up to two meters in length. As with other ammonites, the shell consisted of a series of camerae, or chambers, that were connected to the animal by a narrow tube called a siphuncle by which gas content and thereby buoyancy could be regulated in the same manner as Nautilus does today. The chambers are separated by walls called septa. The line where each septum meets the outer shell is called the suture or suture line. Like other true ammonites, Baculites have intricate suture patterns on their shells that can be used to identify different species. One notable feature about Baculites is that the males may have been a third to a half the size of the females and may have had much lighter ribbing on the surface of the shell. The shell morphology of Baculites with slanted striations or ribbing, similarly slanted aperture, and more narrowly rounded to acute keel-like venter points to its having had a horizontal orientation in life as an adult. This same type of cross section is found in much earlier nautiloids such as Bassleroceras and Clitendoceras from the Ordovician period, which can be shown to have had a horizontal orientation. In spite of this, some researchers have concluded that Baculites lived in a vertical orientation, head hanging straight down, since lacking an apical counterweight, movement was largely restricted to that direction. More recent research, notably by Gerd Westermann, has reaffirmed that at least some Baculites species in fact lived in a more or less horizontal orientation. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Ammonitida Family: †Baculitidae Genus: †Baculites
  12. Melvius thomasi Bryant, 1987

    This tooth was found on an anthill. It was donated to the U.S. Forest Service, Minerals and Geology Management Department., Chadron, Nebraska, in July, 2017.
  13. This was a bone given to us by our guide in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota. I unfortunately did not label it. I think either Triceretops or Edmontosaurus? (those were the common finds for the day...). And would this be a limb bone? The far side is quite semi-circular, and then narrows to more of a smaller oval...
  14. Finishing identifying my daughter's find from this summer at the Hell Creek formation in South Dakota. This one was labeled edmontosaurus bone. Is there a way to get more specific as to *which* bone? It's got a nice curve to it on one side, and the other side has a curve that swoops inward. Just thought I'd ask if those were identifying features...
  15. Finishing identifying some of the kids' finds. This was an awesome vertebra that my daughter dug out in the Hell Creek formation in South Dakota. It was identified for us as a Champsosaurus vertebra. Is there a way to tell *which* vertebra or *where* on the body it came from? Thanks!
  16. Trying to finish up labeling of my kids' finds from the summer. This is one my daughter pulled out of the wall of a dig in the Hell Creek Formation. She had been finding a lot of croc scutes, but this one doesn't have those tell-tale "indentations" - it looks flat/smooth on both sides, but it is about the same size & thickness of her other scute finds (like the one on the right). But is it just a piece of unidentifiable bone?
  17. From our Hell Creek Dino Hunt in Montana, (Summer Road Trip Part 3), we drove back into South Dakota to visit another section of the formation. This was the second of our two days exploring the Hell Creek Formation. For this day, we went to PaleoAdventures (http://www.paleoadventures.com/). We were in South Dakota, and PaleoAdventure's field station was not far from downtown Belle Fourche, and really easy to get to. We just followed the dino signs... Driving up the hill, we came to the small lab/field station/museum/giftshop/bathroom. Inside, we looked around at the fossils (some were for sale), and were given a brief tutorial on what we'd be finding out in the field. Walter, the lead professional paleontologist, had a handful of volunteers with him today, and there was 1 other family who would be joining us on the trip.
  18. Did you watch the "documovie" Dinosaur 13? What do you think of it? Was it slanted to an unacceptable level? What is the part of the truth that is not portrayed in the movie? Why were interviewed just two (or one?) witnesses on the part of the federal government in all the movie? What was really wrong with the activity of the BHI? I would like to know more about that story, about the wrongs of each of the parts interested in the trial. From the movie it seems that the federal government was the evil and the BHI was the good guy: is it a fair reconstruction of the reality or was it the other way around? I am about to read the book of the story, Rex Appeal, because I want to know more about it, I want answers. Probably is not the best choice I could have done, as the book was written by Larson himself and Kristin Donnan, two victims of those events. The fact is, probably buying that book was the only choice, as there are no other books, to my knowledge. Was Pete Larson really doing some illegal trading of fossils as people say? I mean, he seems a good guy, I have read comments by some of you that say so. And his passion is snarge clear: I can see it from his eyes, he is in love with his job. I cannot understand how is possible to convict someone like him of illegal trade of fossils, as he seems well aware of the importance of science and of dinosaurs on education. I know I am in a huge community and probably some of you have more information about that infamous story. That's why I am writing. Thank you guys!
  19. September 2017 was a busy month for me. Worked a day in the Thornton, CO Triceratops dig with other DMNS volunteers and staff. Then headed up with my son to hang out with my friend Walter Stein (Owner of Paleo Adventures), and some of his friends, to help dig at his Tooth Draw Quarry. Several good fossils were found. I found a Nanotyrannus tooth, a Thescelosaurus ulna, and other teeth and small fossils. My best find though, was a very well preserved left dentary from a mammal that may very likely be Didelphodon, or something closely related. Had a fantastic time and and made new and fun friends. Then this past weekend, I went back up to SD by myself, to help my friend Tom Caggiano (Owner of Lost World Fossils) to dig up Edmontosaurus bones at a monospecific bonebed, with some friends of his that have been collecting there for a very long time. Friday was overall a nice day. But we got rained out on Saturday. So we all headed out to Hill City, SD. First we visited with Sandy Gerken. I got to see her fossil prep lab. And several cool fossils she is working on for clients. Then we went to visit BHI and it's museum. Had the guys pose next to the bronze Triceratops skull out front. Also checked out some nice rock shops in the area. On Sunday, weather caused us to have a late start at the Edmontosaurus Bone bed. Worked on trying to fully expose an Edmontosaurus ilium I found on Friday. It turned out to be much larger than we thought. Only had a little more than a half day to work on it so unfortunately, I only got 3/4 of it exposed for removal. I was leaving Monday morning for home, so Tom Caggiano was going to try and finish pulling it out Monday morning before he also leaves. Unfortunately, they got rained out on Monday too. So Ken And Glenn said they would double foil it cover it up for us. I also found a partial Edmontosaurus maxilla, Edmontosaurus sqaumosal, cervical rib, Ischium, small manus phalanx, and a few Edmontosaurus teeth, some with roots. It was a fun trip. It was a pleasure meeting Ken Roblee, Glenn LaPlaca, and @Troodon. All three are very nice gentlemen. They made me feel quite welcome. @Troodon was a pleasure to finally meet up with. He and I spent a lot of time talking about all things dinosaur fossils. Great guy! All four individuals are, in fact, great guys!
  20. Hoploscaphites Nicoletti

    From the album Cephalopods

    This Hoploscaphites nicoletti fossil ammonite is from the Trail City Member of the Fox Hills Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian) of South Dakota. The ammonite measures approximately 2.3 inches in diameter, and sits on a base of original matrix that measures approximately 4.5 x 6 inches. The whole ammonite was "popped" out from the matrix upon which it rests, and is equally well preserved on both sides. The shell has a beautiful pearly iridescent sheen.
  21. Black Hills Institute Museum

    So I went to the Black Hills Insitute and I made a lot of photos, so I thought I'd share. The Black Hills Institute museum in Hill City is pretty small, it's just one hall. But this one hall is absolutely packed with stuff. This is also the home of the T. rex Stan. Many of the skeletons are casts, but there are plenty of real fossils here as well. The skeleton of Stan. This is the real skeleton and the real skull is placed beside it in the corner. But I didn't even notice that at the time. Skull of Torosaurus. Notice the holes in the frill. Triceratops doesn't have these holes in it's frill. Tylosaurus proriger. Another real specimen. Two Allosaurus skeletons. An Ornithomimid as well as Stan, the Senckenberg Edmontosaurus mummy and Tarbosaurus skull in the background. Skeleton of Albertosaurus, skull of Albertosaurus on the left and skull of Gorgosaurus on the right. A second T. rex skeleton. And a lineup of T. rex skulls in the background. Thescelosaurus and Pachycephalosaurus. Juvenile Edmontosaurus skeleton below the second T. rex skeleton. Cast of the Triceratops Raymond. Crestless Pteranodon on the left as well as a Nyctosaurus? arm/wing at the bottom. Dromaeosaurus in the middle between the legs of the Triceratops and a primitive Sirenian with legs on the right. Bambiraptor and Archaeopteryx skeletons. Foot and skull of Deinonychus and Herrerasaurus, Dromaeosaurus and Eoraptor skulls at the bottom. T. rex arm (cast of Sue) and brian endocast left. Nanotyrannus skull on the right. Mongolian Dinosaurs. Saichania and Saurolophus skulls at the top. Velociraptor skull and oviraptorid partial skeletons below that. Prenocephale, Oviraptor, Archaeornithimimus and Alioramus at the bottom. Tethyshadros top left, and Psittacosaurus nest, and skeletons on the bottom left. Brontosaurus leg in the middle and baby Apatosaurus on the right. Velociraptor and Protoceratops fighting on the far right. Edaphosaurus skeleton. And this is just a small selection of the photos I took. There's just so much stuff here and I only spent a few hours here. The gift shop is also worth a vist btw. I bought a rather nice replica of a tooth from Stan and a Thescelosaurus phalange.
  22. Very Weird Tooth!!!

    My wife decided to start cleaning out our shed here where we live. I didnt know that I had fossils in there? Anyways, she brought this to me along with a lot of other stuff, but this one caught my eye. Ive seen these before, but really dont know what it is. My guess is some kind of shark tooth? I did do a bit of prep on it and it does seem to be complete. RB
  23. Inherited Dinosaur Egg

    So I inherited what i believe is a real dinosaur egg. Anyone disagree? The story is my older brother discovered it horseback riding somewhere in South Dakota. I don't have anymore information and need to know about getting it authenticated.
  24. Help with some Hell Creek fossil ID

    Hello there! I live in western South Dakota, and my family has a ranch right in the middle of the Hell Creek Formation. There is a location about 1 mile from a river where about three years ago I found several serrated tooth fragments. I went back to this location last week to see if I could find any more of the tooth fragments. I did find some more serrated fragments, but they are from a different tooth, and possibly different species entirely. There are several areas within a 50 yard radius with bones surfacing, but they seem to be from several different creatures. I'm used to seeing triceratops and duckbill bones at the surface, which are light in color, spongy, and very, very crumbly. Most of the bones in this area are much different, and I'm not sure if that would be due to the type of sediment it was preserved in, the location, or the species. Many of these outcroppings could almost be mistaken for iron ore rock that is breaking apart. I was hoping to get some help identifying one piece in particular. Please ignore the rubber bands, I'm trying to find the missing pieces before I glue the large sections together. All the pieces together will make it around a foot long. In some areas, the bone is a dark chocolate brown, and very smooth and shiny. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I have a really hard time finding any sources of information on theropod, Hell Creek, or Cretaceous identification. If anyone knows of any good literature for this area, feel free to post a link, it would be greatly appreciated!
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