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Found 21 results

  1. Buggy Amber

    Last year, I went to a gem & mineral show and (among other things) acquired this piece of amber. The seller assured me that it was amber (not copal), but he didn't know where it was from or how old it was. I examined the piece (and several others) with my loupe before choosing this one, based of the number and variety of bugs in it. I have several spiders, a couple of ants, some mosquitos (one with an engorged gut if I'm not mistaken in the ID), a beetle, and at least one midge, plus a couple of things I can't identify. My best guess at origin is Burmese. Under a desk lamp: Backlit by my laptop screen: Detailed closeups next!
  2. Arachnid? in Burmese amber

    Hi guys and gal, I recently bought some burmese amber pieces online. When I looked through this particular piece, I was amazed at the inclusion within it. It looks like a spider or tick, or some type of arachnid, however I am no entomologist. I was wondering if one of The Fossil Forum’s members could help me id this mysterious little critter. The specimen come from northern Myanmar/Burma and is about 99 million years old from the middle Cretaceous period. I have never seen an insect like this. It is quite squared in shape. It is a small insect around 3-4 mm. Through a 10x lense Abdomen focused through a 40x microscope What looks like fangs (such as those in arachnids) in a 100x microscope
  3. Hey friends, hope you're all having a great week. Here is a recent purchase of mine, a piece of Baltic Amber with a nicely preserved spider (Araneae sp.), leaf and Midge. Really loved how this looked and couldn't resist. Eocene period 35–50 million years. Dimensions are 20×13×6 mm. Thanks for looking
  4. How do these pieces of amber look? The first few pictures of the flies and the feather are described as deinonychus or velociraptor (or something like this as the description was not clear) from Burma. The last few are of a spider.
  5. New Fossil Spiders With "Glowing" Eyes

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/01/new-fossil-spiders-with-glowing-eyes-found-south-korea/
  6. Spider in amber ID

    This is probably a long shot, but can anyone possibly provide any information about this spider? It's in a piece of Baltic amber. The amber has been polished in a domed shape, so it's hard to get a decent photo, this is probably about as good as it gets.
  7. Florissant spider id ?

    All, My son found this orb-weaver spider at the Florissant Fossil Quarry in Colorado last month. It's about 1.5" (4cm) between the tips of the longest legs. There are short thorns on the abdomen, and possibly on the bases of the legs as well. Overall, it's very much like the golden orb-weavers whose webs I have the occasional misfortune of walking into in my garden. Can anybody tell me what genus, or perhaps even species this may be?
  8. Hello all. I went to a show recently and purchased this piece of amber with an apparent spider inclusion for $78. I don't have all the materials to do testing, but the piece has no taste. Could anyone help me determine if this is legit by looking?
  9. L.S., Last Sunday, I found the specimen shown below on a spoil tip in northern France (Westphalian C, Late Carboniferous). The three photographs were made under different lighting conditions, in an attempt to illustrate the small scale characters of the about 8 mm-long fossil. It appears to be an abdomen (opisthosoma), perhaps of a trigonotarbida spider or some other arthropod. However, since 'beasties' are definitely not my strongsuit, I would really appreciate your suggestions and help to get this little one identified properly. Thanks, Tim
  10. Help with Identification

    Dear Fossil Forum I'm just getting started and trying to get up to speed with my own specimens. I have two poor quality pictures of insects, looking for some help with identification. One is a bi map file of a white spider and one is of a small fly. These specimens are in Baltic amber from Latvia. Please help, any comments would be appreciated! Jimmy
  11. origins of spiders

    Researchers say it's possible - but unlikely - that the animal might still be alive today in the rainforests of southeast Asia. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42945813
  12. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Burmese Amber, Fossil Insect Inclusion, Caddisfly group and a Spider Kachin State, Burma Cretaceous - Cenomanian Age 98.79 ± 0.62 Million Years ago Burmese amber — Cretaceous biota fossilized in prehistoric amber that's found within present day Myanmar (Burma) of Southeast Asia. The caddisflies, or order Trichoptera, are a group of insects with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. There are approximately 14,500 described species, most of which can be divided into the suborders Integripalpia and Annulipalpia on the basis of the adult mouthparts. Integripalpian larvae construct a portable casing to protect themselves as they move around looking for food, while Annulipalpian larvae make themselves a fixed retreat in which they remain, waiting for food to come to them. Spiders (order Araneae) are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. As of November 2015, at least 45,700 spider species, and 113 families have been recorded by taxonomists. Although the fossil record of spiders is considered poor, almost 1000 species have been described from fossils. Because spiders' bodies are quite soft, the vast majority of fossil spiders have been found preserved in amber. The oldest known amber that contains fossil arthropods dates from 130 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous period. In addition to preserving spiders' anatomy in very fine detail, pieces of amber show spiders mating, killing prey, producing silk and possibly caring for their young. In a few cases, amber has preserved spiders' egg sacs and webs, occasionally with prey attached; the oldest fossil web found so far is 100 million years old. Earlier spider fossils come from a few lagerstätten, places where conditions were exceptionally suited to preserving fairly soft tissues. Split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda/Arthropoda Class: Insecta/Arachnida Order: Trichoptera/Araneae
  13. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Burmese Amber, Fossil Insect Inclusion, Caddisfly group and a Spider Kachin State, Burma Cretaceous - Cenomanian Age 98.79 ± 0.62 Million Years ago Burmese amber — Cretaceous biota fossilized in prehistoric amber that's found within present day Myanmar (Burma) of Southeast Asia. The caddisflies, or order Trichoptera, are a group of insects with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. There are approximately 14,500 described species, most of which can be divided into the suborders Integripalpia and Annulipalpia on the basis of the adult mouthparts. Integripalpian larvae construct a portable casing to protect themselves as they move around looking for food, while Annulipalpian larvae make themselves a fixed retreat in which they remain, waiting for food to come to them. Spiders (order Araneae) are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. As of November 2015, at least 45,700 spider species, and 113 families have been recorded by taxonomists. Although the fossil record of spiders is considered poor, almost 1000 species have been described from fossils. Because spiders' bodies are quite soft, the vast majority of fossil spiders have been found preserved in amber. The oldest known amber that contains fossil arthropods dates from 130 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous period. In addition to preserving spiders' anatomy in very fine detail, pieces of amber show spiders mating, killing prey, producing silk and possibly caring for their young. In a few cases, amber has preserved spiders' egg sacs and webs, occasionally with prey attached; the oldest fossil web found so far is 100 million years old. Earlier spider fossils come from a few lagerstätten, places where conditions were exceptionally suited to preserving fairly soft tissues. Split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda/Arthropoda Class: Insecta/Arachnida Order: Trichoptera/Araneae
  14. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Burmese Amber, Fossil Insect Inclusion, Caddisfly group and a Spider Kachin State, Burma Cretaceous - Cenomanian Age 98.79 ± 0.62 Million Years ago Burmese amber — Cretaceous biota fossilized in prehistoric amber that's found within present day Myanmar (Burma) of Southeast Asia. The caddisflies, or order Trichoptera, are a group of insects with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. There are approximately 14,500 described species, most of which can be divided into the suborders Integripalpia and Annulipalpia on the basis of the adult mouthparts. Integripalpian larvae construct a portable casing to protect themselves as they move around looking for food, while Annulipalpian larvae make themselves a fixed retreat in which they remain, waiting for food to come to them. Spiders (order Araneae) are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. As of November 2015, at least 45,700 spider species, and 113 families have been recorded by taxonomists. Although the fossil record of spiders is considered poor, almost 1000 species have been described from fossils. Because spiders' bodies are quite soft, the vast majority of fossil spiders have been found preserved in amber. The oldest known amber that contains fossil arthropods dates from 130 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous period. In addition to preserving spiders' anatomy in very fine detail, pieces of amber show spiders mating, killing prey, producing silk and possibly caring for their young. In a few cases, amber has preserved spiders' egg sacs and webs, occasionally with prey attached; the oldest fossil web found so far is 100 million years old. Earlier spider fossils come from a few lagerstätten, places where conditions were exceptionally suited to preserving fairly soft tissues. Split taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda/Arthropoda Class: Insecta/Arachnida Order: Trichoptera/Araneae
  15. itsy bitsy sequel!

    Once again,arachnophobes please turn away tracefossilarthropo
  16. Halloween Spider!

    Found this guy last night splitting some shale I had laying around. Found on a piece about the size of a quarter!
  17. Florissant Spider?

    Looks like a spider missing a couple legs?
  18. Spider float

    From the album First Fossil Hunt - Summerville, SC

    It was super bright so looking at the spider through my phone's camera I missed that the sun's glare was obscuring this rather large spiders image. Oopsie!
  19. IS 915 kadr

    From the album Spider Exuviae Inside Baltic Amber

    Example of perfect spider Exuviae inside Baltic amber. Eocene Era.
  20. Hello friends ! I got nice amber piece with many insects inside. There we got a spider, many flies, amazing Trichoptera with colour eyes and super Fly laying eggs (!). Nice action scene trapped more than 40 million years ago trapped more than 40 million years ago ...
  21. Hello. I got amazing spider in Baltic Amber and i am really happy for this ! ARCHAEA PARADOXA in beautiful position.
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