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Found 43 results

  1. Dinosaur foot claw

    Hello! I received this claw today Do you know what dinosaur it can be? The seller assures that the claw is not restored. Foot claw and toe bone (posible from other dinosaur) from Kem Kem (Morocco) 0% restoration, ¿Carcharodontosaurus? Size: claw 6cm, bone 3,5cm Thank you so much!
  2. Hi, I have asked before a couple of times about Spinosaur hand claws, i figured my best bet was to look for a Spinosaur foot claw since they seem to be cheaper and less faked imo. I saw this small foot claw supposedly from a Spinosaur (from the Kem Kem) that looks good, but i know i should post it here before thinking about a possible purchase. The seller says it has minor repair. Thanks in advance!
  3. Spinosaurid hand phalanx?

    Hi, Wanted to ask whether this hand phalanx bone resembles a Spinosaurid hand phalanx or whether it might be something else like from a croc or another theropod group (it looks somewhat hollow). It is quite a large bone at about 24.5cm in length and is from the kem kem (it has also had some small repair work). Thanks in advance.
  4. Mosasaur, Plesiosaur or Spinosaur

    Purchased from online. Morocco fossil. Are they Mosasaur, Plesiosaur, Spinosaur or other species? Need help for ID, Thanks!
  5. A Dynamite Dino Donation

    A few months ago we purchased a T-Rex tooth from TFF member @Troodon and he also gave us a super nice Nano tooth. I never got his permission to mention that sale or the gift so I get that anonymous. That is our only T-Rex material and it was also the first fossil donation to our program from a Fossil Forum member. Those teeth really helped us get started becasue it allowed us to use our small budget to fill in other parts of the dinosaur program around having T-Rex stuff. We owe him a huge thank you for that and I wanted to share this on the forum. Well we now have another gigantic THANK YOU to give Frank. I arrived home from work yesterday to find a package from him and it was beautiful dinosaur fossils and some additional non dinosaur Hell Creek material. There were some fantastic fossils in that box and he helped us really strengthen not only the Hell Creek part of dino program but also our African dinosaur section as well. I say this in most of our posts now because it is true. We could not do what we are doing without the support of The Fossil Forum and the members here. @Troodon shares his knowledge and his identification skills with everybody here and that has been invaluable to me. Our dinosaur program is heavily influenced by the knowledge I have gotten from him and bolstered by his generous donations. Thank you Troodon and all of TFF members who donate fossils, share the knowledge and offer encouragement. We really could not do this without you The box o' dinos..... Thescelosaurus fossils (toe bone, vert, two teeth), a beautiful Ceratopsian tooth from HC, an Edmontosaurus tendon, some awesome HC croc teeth, an R.isosceles tooth, a really nice Spino tooth, an abelisaurid tooth,a beautiful Titanosaur indet tooth, and a Ornithomimid toe bone (possibly a juvie Struthiomimus).
  6. Hi, I know claws have been discussed quite a bit before on the forum, but i wanted to ask about this Spinosaur hand claw. It is said to have about 5% restoration and is over 5 inches long. Can anyone spot any red flags to be wary of or does it look good? Thanks.
  7. Hi everyone, Im looking at a bunch of stuff that someone got from the big fossil expo this month, but I want to be sure of what is what before I do anything. There's a few things way beyond what I could potentially get, but I'm just curious about in general. These are all Moroccan, and most, if not all, are Kem Kem. are these first 4 pics spinosaur? With the teeth I know the 2 on the top&left are probably carchar teeth, but I'm wondering about the other 2. In the 2nd picture, I'm guessing the right one is a spinosaur vert, right? What about the other one? I'm sure it would probably be very hard to tell with just a single rib, but could the rib be spinosaurus? It seems to match some museum spino skeleton ribs, but that's the best I can figure out:/
  8. I have this evening and tomorrow to get up a bit more of the dinosaur collection before it is back to sharks. We have programs starting soon so my focus will be well away from dinos for a few months probably. Prepare to be underwhelmed lol I thought we would be heavy on the Moroccan dinosaurs because they are so abundant. Surprisingly, we are pretty light on African dinosaurs. I found a path to getting us deeper into North American animals. It is a bonus that an area we will need to fill is the most abundant and affordable. The dinosaur program will have a different scientific concept behind than sharks. The best state science standard we can hit for 1st-3rd graders is geology so some of the dinosaur program will focus on the formations in goelogical terms. I am looking forward to learning more about the paleoecology of this region and talking about how we can get clues about the habitats from the rocks. It is an interesting collection of animals to learn about. We have a "raptor" tooth from Kem Kem. You know, one of those "raptors". Is it Deltradromodeus or is it an abelisaur? The question can not be answered so we are presenting it as it is, a Theropd indet from North Africa. No need to go much further. It presents a great opportunity to discuss with the kids how difficult it is to describe dinosaur species. We know it is a Theropd tooth and it was carnivorous. We know there are several different dinosaurs it could be but we can not say for sure. I can not tell if my sauropod tooth is a Rebbachisaurus or not but i know you can ID them. I also know there is another sauropod in Kem Kem. If we were presenting tomorrow, it would be Rebbachisaurus. They are one cool looking dinosaur. With some more education, i will be able to tell. Either way, this tooth is the only sauropod fossil we have so this becomes the first dinosaur we really can really expand on. These teeth are inexpensive and this is the only sauropod we are likely to have fossils for. The long-neck dinosaurs are the biggest land animals ever and kids know them so we will be adding more teeth to bulk up the presentation. I have yet to pick up Spinosaur teeth but they are next on the list. I am still learning about Spinosaur teeth and have been cautious. We want to make sure we get some of the inexpensive teeth for the kids to handle and a nice example for the presentation. Carcharodontosaurus is one we will add but not until I have studied them better. There is a wide range of prices and quality. Pic 1- Theropod indet, Kem Kem. Pic 2- Sauropod indet, Kem Kem.
  9. This weekend i made a very lucky find, in the process of cleaning up. Photo's to follow soon. I was very emotional when i picked it up and almost at once saw it was Spinosaur. It mind sound odd ( maybe other fossil hunters may relate to this), that a minute before finding it, i had a strong feeling come across me, of something special nearby. I have identified it as the anterior part of the dentary of a Spinosaur, just before the rostrum begins. There is an eroded partial tooth showing at one end. Maybe more inside the mandibular section. A scan would confirm this. Its 9 cm long, 5.3 cm high and 2.5 cm wide (the corresponding section being a little larger than Baryonyx, which is much younger than this, 125 versus 135 MYA) As far as i know, this would be only the second Spinosaur dentary on the UK mainland, other than the Holotype Baryonyx Walkeri. The isle of Wight (115-125MYA) has had the recent discovery of two Baryonyx , which does have a partial dentary.
  10. Spinosaurus phalanx?

    Is this a spinosaurus phalanx? I believe it's supposed to be a finger, not a toe. Ive done a lot of comparing, and it just doesn't look right, although it's from a source that I trust, and am believe that most of their ID'd stuff is correct, although I believe I've seen a few(very small %)that have been incorrect, over time. I believe it could be a slightly mishappen phalanx, specifically the base/back/end closest to the hand itself. *kem kem
  11. Spinosaur pelvis

    I haven't been able to place it, yet. I figure if I come across someone has familiar knowledge of bones like that, there's a much better chance of recognizing it, than someone just using pics and stuff.
  12. I'm having a hard time finding any images of anything other than the outside/side view of a spinosaur pelvic bone. I'm trying to see what the bone looks like in general, but all too many times...WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY too many times I'll spend forever unsuccessfully trying to come across pictures, images, or diagrams that show what a bone looks like from other angles than what you see be looking at the skeleton from generic angles, like this one. In some cases it's not TOO difficult, but even those common bones have areas that you can never see, unless you get totally lucky and happen across it, OR if there's maybe, hopefully some site/database that specifically shows what entire bones look like. I doubt that, but I know there's perfect diagrams floating around on the web, but I can't seem to find any *im just talking about dinos and other extinct animal bones. I'm sure there's plenty of sites with images of every conceivable angle of every bone from humans and common living animals, but I'm not looking for that kind of thing.
  13. Spinosaurus finger and claw

    This looks a little weird to me. Does this seem like the real genuine article to you guys?
  14. Greetings, I recently bought a beautiful Spinosaurus tooth that was previously restored as some parts were obviously broken and put together with some sort of brown putty which looks like dirt or rock fragments. The problem is that the tooth had an accident a few days ago (it fell from the stand) and it broke again. I put the parts together with super glue but the cracks are now wide and visible and I would like to hide them a little bit by using some putty or resin, I don't want the tooth to look perfect and unbroken, just to look like before it fell, like there is some dirt or rock fragments instead of cracks. Do you have any tip about how to do that? Any brown putty or resin? Thank you very much.
  15. What are These Bones?

    So a while back I was given these fossils along with a Spinosaurus tooth. He said that they were all from the same area and that they were both vertebrae. I can see the touch up on the larger one obviously but it still seems real because of the spongy meterial from the one view. I was just wondering if you could ID these for me I’m pretty new to the fossil scene. Thanks.
  16. My dinosaur fossils

    Hello friends. I am new to this forum and I would like to show you my teeth and dinosaur claw so you can help me identify them, tell me if they are repaired and tell me what their value is. I hope you like them.
  17. Spinosaurus sail?

    Ok, so this is supposed to be a spinosaurus vert, one with part of the sail. At first glance it seems perfect, but upon further study, while trying to place it on spinosaurus skeletons, it doesn't seem to match any exactly. For one thing, spinosaurus sails, at least in the relatively insignificant amount of individuals on display, sail bones that don't go any higher than this one(it appears this is a fully intact sail vert), don't seem to get as wide. And the ones that do, then continue up and get thinner. There ARE similar shaped "sail" bones, at the transition to the neck, and tail, but those aren't as tall as this one. The main bone itself appears to be from the tail, or rear part of the sail, but....well, anywhere that one part of the bone fits well, doesnt seem to match the rest of it very well. Sadly I can't find any good images of many of each type of vert, and anywhere that has good close up views of verts, only have 1 or 2 of any type, which isn't good enough to come to any sufficient conclusions. spinosaur fossils(specifically verts), seem to be something they work with a lot, so I would be very surprised if along with all the other spinosaurus verts they get in, they would end up with the sail spine of some other animal. And if somehow so, then not realizing it.
  18. new paper on tiny Spinosaurus claw

    The smallest biggest theropod dinosaur: a tiny pedal ungual of a juvenile Spinosaurus from the Cretaceous of Morocco https://peerj.com/articles/4785/ Abstract We describe a nearly complete pedal ungual phalanx, discovered in the Kem Kem Beds (Cenomanian) of Tafilalt region, south-eastern Morocco. The bone is symmetric, pointed, low, elongate, and almost flat ventrally in lateral aspect. This peculiar morphology allows to refer the specimen to the smallest known individual of the genus Spinosaurus. The bone belongs to an early juvenile individual and it is proportionally identical to the ungual of the third digit of a large partial skeleton recently found, suggesting an isometric growth for this part of the pes and the retention of peculiar locomotor adaptations—such as traversing soft substrates or paddling—during the entire lifespan.
  19. Possibly a spinosaurid ulna bone?

    I have been looking at this ulna bone from the kem kem, and wondering if a large isolated bone like this can be identified. It is about 26.5cm (10.4 inches) and looks like a chunk of one end in missing (which might make it harder to id). It seems to resemble this megaraptor ulna....
  20. Sigilmassasaurus vertebra

    Fourth cervical vertebra of a Spinosaurid. Very likely Sigilmassasaurus due to the short dorsal spine and proportions of the postzygapophyses.
  21. Young Spinosaurus Quadrate

    Skull bone of a young Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, partial left quadrate. Has some prep damage.
  22. So I was browsing our favourite auction site, and I came across these interesting specimens. The seller claims these all belong to the same individual, while at the same time, strangely, they are selling each bone separately. And while these bones are definitely real Kem Kem bones, I'm posting it in this forum because there is reason to believe the information that these belong to the same animal is suspect. All of these are sold as being from one individual Spinosaurus. This first one is definitely a Spinosaurid cervical vertebra. a fairly nice one. But the rugose triangular area on underside shows that this is in fact from a Sigilmassasaurus, one of the Spinosaurids from Morocco. From the length of the vertebra this can be placed somewhere in the back of the neck of the animal. Next specimen is also a Spinosaurid cervical vertebra. Though due to damage this one is harder to identify as Sigilmassasaurus. Again due to the shortness this seems to be a cervical vertebra from somewhere back in the neck. The dorsal spine though worn, seems to be not that big. So this might point towards it being Sigilmassasaurus as well. So seems fairly plausible if the seller says these belong to the same individual right? Now here comes the problem. This third specimen is listed as belonging to the same individual. But this is clearly a cervical vertebra from a type of crocodile. Since it's nice and complete we can see which way is the front and which is back. The front of the centrum looks to be concave, while the back of the centrum here is convex. This is typical of some crocodiles. But on Spinosaurids it's the other way around, with the front of the centrum being convex and the back is concave. So with that this specimen casts doubt on the whole claim that some of these specimens belong to the same animal. Which is too bad 'cause the fossils seem pretty nice. There were some other specimens as well. But these three were clearly identifiable.
  23. Kem Kem Vertebrae ID Thread

    So, lets figure out vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds. As many of you know the Kem Kem beds has a pretty enigmatic palaeo fauna. There is some literature about it, but not a whole lot. Some of it is behind a paywall and much information is pretty scattered. So I got this idea that maybe we could combine our knowledge and information to collectively get a better picture of which bone belongs to which animal, in this case, vertebrae. I know some of you have some fantastic specimens in your collections, if we combine these in this thread we might be able to see some patterns. We probably won't be able to put a genus or species name on each type, but perhaps assigning certain vertebrae to a morphotype might be possible. With that I encourage everyone that has any vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds to share photos of their specimens and post them here so we can use this thread as a sort of library as well as an ID thread that everyone can use to better ID their Kem Kem vertebrae. So please, share your photos! And it might help to number your specimens for easier reference. I will be updating this first post as new information arises with examples to make ID easier. Theropods Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Spinosaurus is known for it's tall neural spines, which are pretty characteristic. Unlike Sigilmassasaurus, Spinosaurus does not have the ventral triangular rough plateau on the centra Spinosaurus cervical vertebrae Spinosaurus dorsal, sacral and caudal vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis Sigilmassasaurus is a Spinosaurid that might be closely related to Baryonyx and Suchomimus. It differs from Spinosaurus in that it has a ventral keel on many vertebrae and a triangular rough plateau on the bottom back end. A is Sigilmassasaurus, B is Baryonyx Sigilmassasaurus cervical vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus dorsal vertebrae Indeterminate Spinosaurid vertebrae Not a whole lot has been published yet, so some bones can probably not be ID'd on genus level. Spinosaurid caudal vertebrae From Paleoworld-101's collection Charcharodontosaurids Due to an old paper Sigilmassasaurus vertebrae are sometimes misidentified as Carcharodontosaurid. These vertebrae should be identified on the basis of the original description by Stromer. Carcharodontosaurid cervical vertebrae Deltadromeus agilis better examples needed Abelisauroids Indeterminate Abelisauroid distal caudal From LordTrilobite's collection Abelisaurid dorsal vertebrae From Troodon's collection Sauropods Rebbachisaurus garasbae Not a whole lot is known about this titanosaur, as only a few bones have been found. Notice that the vertebrae are very extensively pneumaticised. Rebbachisaurus dorsal vertebrae Unnamed Titanosaurian mid caudal vertebra Crocodiles more examples needed Kemkemia This crocodile is only known by a single terminal caudal vertebra. Kemkemia caudal vertebra Turtles examples needed Pterosaurs Azhdarchids Azhdarchid (probably Alanqa) posterior fragment cervical vertebra Azhdarchid Mid cervical vertebra Sources Spinosaurids https://peerj.com/articles/1323/?utm_source=TrendMD&utm_campaign=PeerJ_TrendMD_1&utm_medium=TrendMD http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144695 Sauropods Jeffrey A. Wilson & Ronan Allain (2015) Osteology of Rebbachisaurus garasbae Lavocat, 1954, a diplodocoid (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from the early Late Cretaceous–aged Kem Kem beds of southeastern Morocco, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 35:4, e1000701, DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2014.1000701 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304214496_Evidence_of_a_derived_titanosaurian_Dinosauria_Sauropoda_in_the_Kem_Kem_beds_of_Morocco_with_comments_on_sauropod_paleoecology_in_the_Cretaceous_of_Africa Kemkemia sisn.pagepress.org/index.php/nhs/article/viewFile/nhs.2012.119/32 Pterosaurs https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thefossilforum.com%2Fapplications%2Fcore%2Finterface%2Ffile%2Fattachment.php%3Fid%3D432009&fname=journal.pone.0010875.PDF&pdf=true https://riviste.unimi.it/index.php/RIPS/article/view/5967
  24. New Paper on Spinosaurid Taxonomy

    I found this new paper on Spinosaurid taxonomy in Brazil. I haven't read it yet but it seems pretty interesting as this is still quite an enigmatic group of dinosaurs. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0187070 Spinosaur taxonomy and evolution of craniodental features: Evidence from Brazil Abstract Fossil sites from Brazil have yielded specimens of spinosaurid theropods, among which the most informative include the cranial remains of Irritator, Angaturama, and Oxalaia. In this work some of their craniodental features are reinterpreted, providing new data for taxonomic and evolutionary issues concerning this particular clade of dinosaurs. The mesial-most tooth of the left maxilla of the holotype of Irritator is regarded as representing the third tooth position, which is also preserved in the holotype of Angaturama. Thus, both specimens cannot belong to the same individual, contrary to previous assumptions, although they could have been the same taxon. In addition, the position of the external nares of Irritator is more comparable to those of Baryonyx and Suchomimus instead of other spinosaurine spinosaurids. In fact, with regards to some craniodental features, Brazilian taxa represent intermediate conditions between Baryonychinae and Spinosaurinae. Such a scenario is corroborated by our cladistic results, which also leave open the possibility of the former subfamily being non-monophyletic. Furthermore, the differences between spinosaurids regarding the position and size of the external nares might be related to distinct feeding habits and degrees of reliance on olfaction. Other issues concerning the evolution and taxonomy of Spinosauridae require descriptions of additional material for their clarification.
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