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Found 18 results

  1. Croc or spinosaurid teeth? Kem kem

    Hi! Are these teeth croc or spino teeth? , The curvature and the robustness makes me wonder if they could be croc teeth. Both are from Kem Kem Tooth 1:
  2. Saw this online, it looks suspicious (but i am no expert) and i thought i would post here for confirmation. It is over 6 and a half inches long.
  3. Baryonyx tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Baryonyx tooth Wessex Formation
  4. I've been looking at this 9 cm tooth at an online shop, but it's identified as Suchomimus tenerensis from Hamada gu Guir, Kem Kem, Morocco, and as far as I can gather, Suchomimus has only been found in Niger. I'm very much an amateur but I haven't seen striations on any Spinosaurus teeth I've come across. Any ideas?
  5. These bones from the Kem Kem Beds of Morocco are being offered for sale as Spinosaurus Phalanx Toe Bones. They appear to be carpals, hand bones, and most likely from one of the Spinosaurid's in that fauna. Please note that I've yet to find any technical paper that describes any Spinosaurid hand bones The seller indicates only some glued and fill fractures however the excessive matrix on both these carpals might indicate otherwise. The distal end of the carpal on the right appears to have lots of "fill"
  6. Location: Morocco Kem Kem Beds To often Crocodile jaws are composited with Spinosaurid teeth and sold as Spinosaurus jaws. So the purpose of this topic is to show the diagnostic features of Spinosaurid jaws First its extremely rare that any jaw from this region contains functional teeth. Germ/unerupted teeth are more common but those are typically well into the tooth cavity and not protuding above the jaw line. So its highly probable that those you see sold with teeth are composited. We currently do not know if there is a variation between the jaws of the different Spinosaurids described or yet to be discovered in this region so there could be some difference between them but the general characteristics should be similar. Here is a composite skull in private hands and paleontologist Cristophe Hendrickx drawing of that skull Dentary: This is Stromers original plate. 1) You can see the variation in the lateral (side) view of jaw. A very wide anterior end and more V shaped toward the hinge. So jaw sections that you see sold which are straight across are probably crocodile. 2) The teeth are also not positioned in a straight line, and not always next to one another. 3) The most telling feature is the lip on the labial side. It should be present across the entire length of the jaw 4) Broken dentary jaw sections being sold should wide not narrow like croc's Closeup of Lip Close up of germ/unerupted teeth Premaxillary/Maxillary Much more robust than dentary however the lip feature is still present but on the lingual side. Very wide in lateral view. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144695 dal Sasso, C.; Maganuco, S.; Buffetaut, E.; Mendez, M.A. (2005). New information on the skull of the enigmatic theropod Spinosaurus with remarks on its sizes and affinities. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25 (4): 888–896. doi:10.1671/0272-4634(2005)025[0888:NIOTSO]2.0.CO;2 Maxilla for sale with composite teeth
  7. Sigilmassasaurus vertebra

    Fourth cervical vertebra of a Spinosaurid. Very likely Sigilmassasaurus due to the short dorsal spine and proportions of the postzygapophyses.
  8. Spinosaurus Quadrate & Quadratojugal

    Skull bones of an adult Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, consists of a right quadrate and partial quadratojugal. There is some slight lateral crushing, otherwise the bone is in wonderful condition. The quadratojugal is slightly out of place and jammed into the quadrate anteriorly.
  9. The past few weeks at the Tucson Fossil I ran across a few fake Spinosaur claws but also was surprised how many good ones there were on the market. I also understand the issues with online claws so decided to put this topic out to help collectors gain a better understanding of them since they are very expensive. These are my opinions and welcome others since no one person as all the answers. There is no bullet proof approach you can take to insure you have a claw that is not totally fake or composited. There are some things you need to consider. - First try dealing with what I call preferred Moroccan merchants, those are typically found at big shows and a few have online or FB sites, ones that specialize in Moroccan material are the best. They typically know what to look for and can point out issues with claws. Makes life a bit harder to get one but you want a good claw don't you. This does not take you off the hook its still YOUR responsibility to know what you are buying. - Unless you are an expert never buy one from Auction site. If you see one that interest you see seek assistant from an expert, not a collector friend, or post it here on the forum we have lots of opinions here. - 2D photos are not always the best to see what is going on with a claw, I prefer handling one. Composited claws can be good and photos don't show you all the issues. - Good preservation and quality are key for making life easy in deciding if its a good claw or not. There is where it pays to focus on the better claws. Claws that are deformed, partial, compressed, beat up or have matrix on them are very difficult to insure you have a good one and especially hard for experts to positively say its good. It always best to save and wait to buy a higher end one. - As a general rule try avoid claws that have matrix glued on them or have seams with matrix. The matrix is there for only one reason to hid trouble. Matrix is a red flag, just tread carefully when looking at one of these. Ask yourself why risk it and buy a potentially problem claw, there are plenty out there that are clean. PRICE = Preservation (Quality) + Size - Repairs - Real claws are expensive, simple as that. Nice ones in the 6+ inch range can easily fetch over 1K depending on quality, 7+ inches can go over 10K . So if you see big claws under 1K there must be a reason unless its the deal of a century and they exist. Most of the claws I show are in the 1-2K range for 4-6 inches. Here are a few from the Tucson show to give you an understanding what real ones look like. Focus on shape, the articulation end, blood grooves and preservation. These two are clean no matrix, no compression may have been broken and reattached, reasonable preservation. Nice claws for any collection Higher Grade - Fatter, nice surface finish, good preservation, few if any repairs. Couple of more examples. Honest merchant shows, some repair and resto. Excellent high end claw around 7 inches very very expensive Fake Claws These two were laying in the box and the merchant said he just had them fabricated. They look pretty good to a novice both reasonable size and configuration. Probably copied from a good one. Red Flags : Check out the graining its does not follow the curve of the claw but is straight. Uniform Color and looks too clean. Finish is flat with no hit of sheen seen on bone. Super long ones are the most suspect, here are two in a box. Unusually long and thin, usually the dorsal curvature is not smooth to the tip has kinks, the preservation is odd, hard to see bone, lots of surface repairs. These may be composited, faked or combo? Who knows to risky to find out. Off an auction site - terrible fake easier to spot- 6.9 inch claw One of the hardest items to replicate is the blood groove that is on either side of the claw. The groove is the widest at the articulation end and slowly tapers to a point to form a channel at the tip that extends outward beyond the dorsal surface. Here is an example of a perfectly preserved one. Here is the tip of the claw from above and you can see the blood groove is just a channel in the claw. Another Characteristic on these claws is that when looked at from the top or bottom they are shaped like an isosceles triangle. Much bigger at the articulation end than the tip. Preservation may affect this but most should be tapered. Like most theropods, hand claws vary depending on digit so there will be variations depending on that and the number of different Spinosaurids that exist in Kem Kem. This is a big unknown and we believe these type of claws all belong to the Spinosaurid family. But here are a couple more you can check out the blood grooves, articulation and shape More Examples of Fake Hand Claws: Photo provided by Jim Kirkland Carved, Composited etc Badly carved claw
  10. Came across this site hosted by Christophe Hendrickx a well known theropod Paleontologist. A lot of what he has is already provided in papers but this is the first site completely dedicated to the worldwide group of dinosaurs know as Spinosauridae Pretty cool. This site like many others has a bias toward what paleontologist believes and who he is associated with... so no mention Sigilmassasaurus. I found it interesting but its not gospel just another source of information and opinion. Remember theropods from the Kem Kem especially Spinosaurids are poorly understood and lots of different opinions are out there. It provides multiple language translations from French so its perfect to our worldwide members. http://spinosauridae.fr.gd/Accueil.htm Lots of cool illustrations all together. Spinosaurus vertebra Suchomimus arm
  11. Spinosaurid tooth

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    Spinosaurid tooth purchased from store. Labeled spinosaurus sp. from morroco.
  12. Rooted Spinosaurid tooth

    The newest addition to our dinosaur fossil collection from the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco, a rooted Spinosaurid tooth. It is 6 inches in length, and really shows the strength and size of this animal. There is some cool feed wear on the tip as well. This one is for my 7 year old son, and will be in his Easter basket on Sunday morning. Spinosaurus is is favorite dinosaur, and he's going to go bananas! Can't wait to see the look on his face! .
  13. Sigilmassasaurus vertebra

    Vertebral process of Sigilmassasaurus. This is likely a mid cervical vertebra. It also bears close resemblance to the Spinosaurus maroccanus holotype which I consider to be synonymous with Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis.
  14. Spinosaurid Tooth

    From the album Reptile Fossils

    Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Stromer, 1915 A tooth of a Spinosaurid. Location: Kem Kem beds, Morocco Age: Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous

    © Olof Moleman

  15. Possible Spinosaurid

    From the album Kem Kem teeth

    Possible Spinosaurid
  16. Spinosaurid tooth

    From the album Reptile Fossils

    Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Stromer, 1915 A tooth of a Spinosaur. Location: Kem Kem beds, Morocco Age: Cenomanian, Upper Cretaceous

    © Olof Moleman

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