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Found 7 results

  1. African theropoda

    lakinlongrichspinosaujuvenilmoroc1-theropafricadinosontogs2.0-S0195667118302052-main.pdf Rebecca J.Lakin, Nicholas Longrich: Juvenile spinosaurs (Theropoda.Spinosauridae) from the Middle Cretaceous of Morocco and implications for spinosaur ecology. 3,77 Mb Recommended, given authors and source publication (Els**ier's editorial policies are strict and thorough, as such things go.) Note: co-coccurence of adult and juveniles. Enjoy, dinosaur lovers.
  2. Suchomimus

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

  3. Hello everyone, looking for a well-known auction site I came across this tooth of Spinosaurus. At first glance does not seem to have big problems but I'm inexperienced so I ask you. There is only 1 photo so the details are detail of the first one. Thank you
  4. Here we go, I finally got two nice Sinosauridae indet. teeth (long more or less 8-9 cm). I love the fact that one is pointy and not broken, while the bigger one has the typical ridges along the tooth. What do you think?
  5. Hello everybody, I have the chance to get my hands on this Spinosauridae indet tooth from KemKem / Morocco. This is not from any action side or an online shop, I got lucky and saw the tooth by myself since this is sold here in my hometown. The curent seller got it from an online shop. The online shop said there are no repairs or anything. These are the pictures I took by myself. The tooth is 3.3 inches long. Would love to have your opinions on this one. Some repairs? Some fabrications? Is the white part at the end part of the root? Any help is welcome. Thank you so much! If you want to see a specific area in more detail please let me know. I can provide more pictures.
  6. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since March 24, 2018. Order Saurischia Suborder Theropoda Infraorder Tetanurae Brusatte, S.L., et al. (2010). The skull of Monolophosaurus jiangi (Dinosaura: Theropoda) and its implications for early theropod phylogeny and evolution. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, Vol.158, Number 3. Rauhut, O.W.M. and D. Pol (2017). A Theropod Dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Canadon Calcareo Formation of Central Patagonia, and the Evolution of the Theropod Tarsus. Ameghiniana, 54. Zhao, X.-J., et al. (2010). The postcranial skeleton of Monolophosaurus jiangi (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Middle Jurassic of Xinjiang, China, and a review of Middle Jurassic Chinese theropods. Geol.Mag., 147(1). Division Carnosauria Subdivision Spinosauroidea Family Megalosauridae Subfamily Megalosaurinae Allain, R. (2002). Discovery of Megalosaur (Dinosauria, Theropoda) in the Middle Bathonian of Normandy (France) and its Implications for the Phylogeny of Basal Tetanurae. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 22(3). Araujo, R., et al. (2013). Filling the gaps of dinosaur eggshell phylogeny: Late Jurassic Theropod clutch with embryos from Portugal. Scientific Reports, 3:1924. Benson, R.B.J. (2010). A description of Megalosaurus bucklandii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Bathonian of the UK and the relationships of Middle Jurassic theropods. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 158. Benson, R.B.J., et al. (2008). The Taxonomic Status of Megalosaurus bucklandii (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Middle Jurassic of Oxfordshire, UK. Palaeontology, Vol.51, Part 2. Britt, B.B. (1991). Theropods of Dry Mesa Quarry (Morrison Formation, Late Jurassic), Colorado, with Emphasis on the Osteology of Torvosaurus tanneri. Masters Thesis - Brigham Young University, In: Brigham Young University Geology Studies, Vol.37. Buckland, W. (1824). XXI. Notice on the Megalosaurus or Great Fossil Lizard of Stonesfield. Transactions of the Geological Society of London, 1. Csiki-Sava, Z., S.L. Brusatte and S. Vasile (2016). "Megalosaurus cf. superbus" from southeastern Romania: The oldest known Cretaceous carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) and its implications for earliest Cretaceous Europe-Gondwana connections. Cretaceous Research, 60. Del Corro, G. (1974). A New Megalosaur (Carnosaur) from the Cretaceous of Chubut (Argentina). Communicaciones Del Museo Argentino De Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" E Instituto Nacional De Investigacion De Las Ciencias Naturales, Vol.1, Number 5. Galton, P.M. and J.A. Jensen (1979). A New Large Theropod Dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Colorado. BYU Geology Studies. Hendrickx, C. and O. Mateus (2014). Torvosaurus gurneyi n.sp., the Largest Terrestrial Predator from Europe, and a Proposed Terminology of the Maxilla Anatomy in Nonavian Theropods. PLoS ONE, 9(3). Leidy, J. (1868). Remarks on a jaw fragment of Megalosaurus. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Vol.20. Mateus, O. and M.T. Antunes (2000). Torvosaurus sp. (Dinosauria: Theropoda) in the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Congresso Iberico de Paleontologia/XVI Jornadas de la Sociedad Espanola de Paleontologia. Rauhut, O.W.M. and J. Kriwet (1994). Teeth of a big Theropod Dinosaur from Porto das Barcas (Portugal). Berliner geowiss.Abh., E13. Waldman, M. (1974). Megalosaurids from the Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) of Dorset. Palaeontology, Vol.17, Part 2. General Megalosauridae Allain, R. (2005). The Postcranial Anatomy of the Megalosaur Dubreuillosaurus valesdunensis (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Middle Jurassic of Normandy, France. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 25(4). Allain, R. and D.J. Chure (2002). Poekilopleuron bucklandii, The Theropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Normandy. Palaeontology, Vol.45, Part 6. Gao, Y. (1992). Yangchuanosaurus hepingensis - A New Species of Carnosaur from Zigong, Sichuan. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, Vol.30, Number 4. Hasegawa, Y., et al. (1992). The First Carnosaur (Saurischia; Theropoda) from Japan: A Tooth from the Cenomanian Mifune Group of Kyushu. Sci.Repts., Yokohama Natl.Univ.,Sec.II, Number 39. Hendrickx, C, O. Mateus and R. Araujo (2015). The dentition of megalosaurid theropods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(3). Lim, J.-D., L.D. Martin and K.S. Baek (2002). The first megalosaurid tooth from South Korea. Current Science, Vol.82, Number 3. Lockley, M.G., C.A. Meyer and V.F. dos Santos (1998). Megalosauripus and the Problematic Concept of Megalosaur Footprints. GAIA, Number 15. Okazaki, Y. (1992). A New Genus and Species of Carnivorous Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Kwanmon Group, Northern Kyushu. Bull. Kitakyushu Mus.Nat.Hist., 11. Rauhut, O.W.M., et al. (2018). The largest European theropod dinosaurs: remains of a gigantic megalosaurid and giant theropod tracks from the Kimmeridgian of Asturias, Spain. PeerJ, 6:e4963. (36.3MB) (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Rayfield, E.J. (2011). Structural Performance of Tetanuran Theropod Skulls, With Emphasis on the Megalosauridae, Spinosauridae and Carcharodontosauridae. Palaeontology, Special Papers in Palaeontology, 86. Family Spinosauridae Buffetaut, E. (2011). An early spinosaurid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania) and the evolution of the spinosaurid dentition. Oryctos, Vol.10. Buffetaut, E., et al. (2008). An Early Cretaceous spinosaurid theropod from southern China. Geol.Mag., 145(5). Subfamily Baryonichinae Allain, R., et al. (2012). The first definitive Asian spinosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the early cretaceous of Laos. Naturwissenschaften, 99(5). Fowler, D.W. (2007). Recently Rediscovered Baryonychine Teeth (Dinosauria: Theropoda): New Morphologic Data, Range Extension & Similarity to Ceratosaurus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(3). (Thanks to Troodon for pointing this one out!) Hone, D.W.E., X. Xu and D.-Y. Wang (2010). A Probable Baryonychine (Theropoda: Spinosauridae) Tooth from the Upper Cretaceous of Henan Province, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 48(1). Mateus, O., et al. (2011). A new specimen of the theropod dinosaur Baryonyx from the early Cretaceous of Portugal and taxonomic validity of Suchosaurus. Zootaxa, 2827. Ruiz-Omenaca, J.I., et al. (2005). Baryonychine teeth (Theropoda: Spinosauridae) from the Lower Cretaceous of La Cantanera (Josa, NE Spain). Kaupia, Vol.14. Sereno, P.C., et al. (1998). A Long-Snouted Predatory Dinosaur from Africa and the Evolution of Spinosaurids. Science, Vol.282. Subfamily Spinosaurinae Alexander, W.A., et al. (2011). A new dinosaur (Theropoda, Spinosauridae) from the Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Alcantra Formation, Cajual Island, Brazil. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciencias, 83(1). Buffetaut, E. and M. Ouaja (2002). A new specimen of Spinosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of Tunisia, with remarks on the evolutionary history of the Spinosauridae. Bull.soc.geol. France, Vol.173, Number 5. Dal Sasso, C., et al. (2005). The Skull of the Enigmatic Theropod Spinosaurus, With Remarks on its Size and Affinities. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 25(4). Evers, S.W., et al. (2015). A reappraisal of the morphology and systematic position of the theropod dinosaur Sigilmassasaurus from the "middle" Cretaceous of Morocco. PeerJ, 3:e1323. Gimsa, J., R. Sleigh and U. Gimsa (2015). The riddle of Spinosaurus aegyptiacus' dorsal sail. Geol.Mag.-Rapid Communication. Hasegawa, Y., et al. (2010). Fine sculptures on a tooth of Spinosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from Morocco. Bull. Gunma Mus.Natu.Hist., 14. Henderson, D.M. (2018). A buoyancy, balance and stability challenge to the hypothesis of a semi-aquatic Spinosaurus Stromer, 1915 (Dinosauria: Theropoda). PeerJ, 6:e5409. (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Hendrickx, C., O. Mateus and E. Buffetaut (2016). Morphofunctional Analysis of the Quadrate of Spinosauridae (Dnosauria: Theropoda) and the Presence of Spinosaurus and a Second Spinosaurine Taxon in the Cenomanian of North Africa. PLoS ONE, 11(1). Ibrahim, N., et al. (2014). Semiaquatic adaptations in a giant predatory dinosaur. Science, Vol.345, Issue 6204. Kellner, A.W.A., et al. (2011). A new dinosaur (Theropoda, Spinosauridae) from the Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Alcantara Formation Cajual Island, Brazil. Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, 83(1). Maganuco, S. and C. Dal Sasso (2018). The smallest biggest theropod dinosaur: a tiny pedal ungual of a juvenile Spinosaurus from the Cretaceous of Morocco. PeerJ, 6:e4785. (Thanks to LordTrilobite for pointing me to this one!) Smith, J.B., et al. (2006). New Information Regarding the Holotype of Spinosaurus aegypticus Stromer, 1915. J.Paleont., 80(2). Sues, H.-D., et al. (2002). Irritator challengeri, a Spinosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 22(3). General Spinosauridae Alonso, A. and J.I. Canudo (2015). On the spinosaurid theropod teeth from the early Barremian (Early Cretaceous) Blesa Formation (Spain). Historical Biology, 28(6). Amiot, R., et al. (2010). Oxygen isotope evidence for semi-aquatic habits among spinosaurid theropods. Geology, Vol.38, Number 2. Barrett, P.M., et al. (2011). First spinosaurid dinosaur from Australia and the cosmopolitanism of Cretaceous dinosaur faunas. Biology Letters, 7. Benyoucef, M., et al. (2015). Overabundance of piscivorous dinosaurs (Theropoda: Spinosauridae) in the mid-Cretaceous of North Africa: The Algerian dilemma. Cretaceous Research, 55. Bertin, T. (2010). A Catalogue of Materials and Review of the Spinosauridae. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology, 7(4). Buffetaut, E. (2013). An early spinosaurid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania) and the evolution of the spinosaurid dentition. Oryctos, Vol.10. Buffetaut, E. (2008). Spinosaurid Teeth from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru, Tanzania, With Remarks on the Evolutionary and Biogeographical History of the Spinosauridae. In: Mid-Mesozoic Life and Environments - Cognac (France). Docum.Lab.Geol. Lyon, Number 164. Buffetaut, E., D. Martill and F. Escuillié (2004). Pterosaurs as part of a spinosaur diet. Nature - Brief Communications, Vol.430. Buffetaut, E., et al. (2008). An Early Cretaceous spinosaurid theropod from southern China. Geol.Mag., 145(5). Candeiro, C.R.A., S.L. Brusatte and A.L. de Souza (2017). Spinosaurid Dinosaurs from the Early Cretaceous of North Africa and Europe: Fossil Record, Biogeography and Extinction. Anuario do Instituto de Geociencias - UFRJ, Vol.40-3. Cuff, A.R. and E.J. Rayfield (2013). Feeding Mechanics in Spinosaurid Theropods and Extant Crocodilians. PLoS ONE, 8(5). Hone, D.W.E. and T.R. Holtz (2017). A Century of Spinosaurs - A Review and Revision of the Spinosauridae with Comments on Their Ecology. Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol.91, Number 3. (Thanks to doushantuo for pointing this one out!) Isasmendi Mata, E. (2018). Study of isolated teeth of theropod dinosaurs: Spinosaurids of the Early Cretaceous of La Rioja in an Iberian context. Universidad del Pais Vasco. Kubota, K., Y. Takakua and Y. Hasegawa (2017). Second discovery of a spinosaurid tooth from the Sebayashi Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Kanna Town, Gunma Prefecture, Japan. Bull. Gunma Mus.Natu.Hist., 21. Medeiros, A.M. (2006). Large Theropod Teeth from the Eocenomanian of Northeastern Brazil and the Occurrence of Spinosauridae. Revista bras.paleont., 9(3). Milner, A.C. (2001). Fish-Eating Theropods: A Short Review of the Systematics, Biology and Palaeobiogeography of Spinosaurs. In: II Jornadas de Paleontologia de Dinosaurios y su Entorno. Salas de los Infantes (Burgos, Espana). Rayfield, E.J. (2011). Structural Performance of Tetanuran Theropod Skulls, With Emphasis on the Megalosauridae, Spinosauridae and Carcharodontosauridae. Palaeontology, Special Papers in Palaeontology,86. Rayfield, E.J., et al. (2007). Functional Morphology of Spinosaur 'Crocodile-Mimic' Dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(4). Sales, M.A.F. and C.L. Schultz (2017). Spinosaur taxonomy and evolution of craniodental features: Evidence from Brazil. PLoS ONE, 12(11). (Thanks to LordTrilobite for locating this one!) Serrano-Martinez, A., et al. (2016). Isolated theropod teeth from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the early dental evolution of Spinosauridae. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(2). Taquet, P. and D.A. Russell (1998). New data on spinosaurid dinosaurs from the Early Cretaceous of the Sahara. Earth & Planetary Sciences, 327. Subdivision Allosauroidea Family Allosauridae Anton, M., et al. (2003). The Muscle-Powered Bite of Allosaurus (Dinosauria; Theropoda): An Interpretation of Cranio-Dental Morphology. Estudios Geol.,59. Bates, K.T., et al. (2009). How Big was 'Big Al'? Quantifying the Effect of Soft Tissue and Osteological Unknowns on Mass Predictions for Allosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.2, Issue 3. Carpenter, K. (2010). Variations in a population of Theropoda (Dinosauria): Allosaurus from the Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry (Upper Jurassic), Utah, USA. Paleontological Research, Vol.14, Number 4. Chure, D.J. (2000). Observations on the Morphology and Pathology of the Gastric Basket of Allosaurus, Based on a New Specimen from Dinosaur National Monument. Oryctos, Vol.3. Chure, D.J. (1995). A Reassessment of the Gigantic Theropod Saurophagus maximus from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Oklahoma, USA. In: Sixth Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota, Short Papers. Sun, A. and Y. Wang (eds.), China Ocean Press, Beijing. Foster, J.R. and D.J. Chure (2006). Hindlimb Allometry in the Late Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur Allosaurus, With Comments on its Abundance and Distribution. In: Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. Foster, J.R. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 36. Foth, C., et al. (2015). New insights into the lifestyle of Allosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) based on another specimen with multiple pathologies. PeerJ 3:e940. Gilmore, C.W. (1920). Osteology of the Carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, With Special Reference to the Genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. United States National Museum, Bulletin 110. (213 pages) Gilmore, C.W. (1915). On the Fore Limb of Allosaurus fragilis. Proceedings U.S. National Museum, Vol.49, Number 2120. Heckert, A.B., et al. (2003). An Upper Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur from the Section 19 Mine, Morrison Formation, Grants Uranium District. New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 54th Field Conference, Geology of the Zuni Plateau. Laws, R.R. (1996). Paleopathological Analysis of a Sub-Adult Allosaurus fragilis (MOR 693) from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation With Multiple Injuries and Infections. Masters Thesis - Montana State University - Bozeman. Madsen, J.H. (1976). Allosaurus fragilis: A Revised Osteology. Utah Geological Survey, Bulletin 109. Mateus, O., A. Walen and M.T. Antunes (2006). The Large Theropod Fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its Similarity to the Morrison Formation, With a Description of a New Species of Allosaurus. In: Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 36. McClelland, B.K. (1990). Anatomy and Kinesis of the Allosaurus Skull. Masters Thesis - Texas Tech University. (168 pages) Osborn, H.F. (1912). Part I. Crania of Tyrannosaurus and Allosaurus (includes Part II. Integument of the Iguanodont Dinosaur Trachodon). Memoirs of the American Museum of Natural History, New Series, Vol.1. (74.3 MB download) Paul, G.S. and K. Carpenter (2010). Case 3506. Allosaurus Marsh, 1877 (Dinosauria, Theropoda): proposed conservation of usage by designation of a neotype for its type species Allosaurus fragilis Marsh, 1877. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature, 67(1). Perez-Moreno, B.P., et al. (1999). On the presence of Allosaurus fragilis (Theropoda: Carnosauria) in the Upper Jurassic of Portugal: first evidence of an intercontinental dinosaur species. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 156. Rayfield, E.J. (2005). Aspects of comparative cranial mechanics in the theropod dinosaurs Coelophysis, Allosaurus, and Tyrannosaurus. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 144. Snively, E., et al. (2013). Multibody dynamics model of head and neck function in Allosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda). Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.16, Issue 2. Family Carcharodontosauridae Subfamily Carcharodontosaurinae Brusatte, S.L. and P.C. Sereno (2007). A New Species of Carcharodontosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Cenomanian of Niger and a Revision of the Genus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(4). Rauhut, O.W.M. (1995). The Systematic Position of the African Theropods Carcharodontosaurus Stromer 1931 and Bahariasaurus Stromer 1934. Berliner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen, E., 16.1. Tribe Gigantosaurini Barrick, R.E. and W.J. Showers (1999). Thermophysiology and Biology of Giganotosaurus: Comparison with Tyrannosaurus. Palaeontologia Electronica - Discussion. Bell, P.R. and R.A. Coria (2013). Palaeopathological Survey of a Population of Mapusaurus (Theropoda: Carcharodontosauridae) from the Late Cretaceous Huincul Formation, Argentina. PLoS ONE, 8(5). Blanco, R.E. and G.V. Mazzetta (2001). A new approach to evaluate the cursorial ability of the giant theropod Giganotosaurus carolinii. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 46(2). Calvo, J.O. (1998). New Specimen of Giganotosaurus carolinii (Coria & Salgado, 1995) Supports it as the Largest Theropod Ever Found. Gaia, No.15. Canale, J.I., et al. (2014). Cranial ontogenetic variation in Mapusaurus roseae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) and the probable role of heterochrony in carcharodontosaurid evolution. Palaontol.Z., 89(4). Carabajal, A.P. and J.I. Canale (2010). Cranial endocast of the carcharodontosaurid theropod Gigantosaurus carolinii Coria & Salgado, 1995. N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 258/2. Coria, R.A. and P.J. Currie (2006). A new carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. Geodiversitas, 28(1). Coria, R.A. and P.J. Currie (2002). The Braincase of Gigantosaurus carolinii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 22(4). Subfamily incertae sedis/indet. Brusatte, S.L., R.B.J. Benson and X. Xu (2012). A reassessment of Kelmayisaurus petrolicus, a large theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of China. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 57(1). Brusatte, S.L., et al. (2010). The osteology of Shaochilong maortuensis, a carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Asia. Zootaxa, 2334. Brusatte, S.L., et al. (2009). The first definitive carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from Asia and the delayed ascent of tyrannosaurids. Naturwissenschaften, 96. Cau, A., F.M. Dalla Vecchia and M. Fabbri (2012). Evidence of a new carcharodontosaurid from the Upper Cretaceous of Morocco. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 57(3). Cau, A., F.M. Dalla Vecchia and M. Fabbri (2012). A thick-skulled theropod (Dinosauria, Saurischia) from the Upper Cretaceous of Morocco with implications for carcharodontosaurid cranial evolution. Cretaceous Research, xxx. (Article in press) Currie, P.J. and K. Carpenter (2000). A new specimen of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis (Therapoda, Dinosauria) from the Lower Cretaceous Antlers Formation (Lower Cretaceous, Aptian) of Oklahoma, USA.Geodiversitas, 22(2). D'Emic, M.D., K.M. Melstrom and D.R. Eddy (2012). Paleobiology and geographic range of the large-bodied Cretaceous theropod dinosaur Acrocanthosaurus atokensis. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 333-334. Eddy, D.R. and J.A. Clarke (2011). New Information of the Cranial Anatomy of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Its Implications for the Phylogeny of Allosauroidea (Dinosauria: Theropoda). PLoS ONE, 6(3). Fernandes de Azevedo, R.P., et al. (2013). First Brazilian carcharodontosaurid and other new theropod dinosaur fossils from the Campanian-Maastrichtian Presidente Prudente Formation, Sao Paolo State, southeastern Brazil. Cretaceous Research, 40. Gasca, J.M., J.I. Canudo and M. Moreno-Azanza (2014). A large-bodied theropod (Tetanurae: Carcharodontoosauria) from the Mirambel Formation (Barremian) of Spain. N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., 273/1. Harris, J.D. (1998). A Reanalysis of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis, its Phylogenetic Status, and Paleobiogeographic Implications, Based on a New Specimen from Texas. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 13. (Read on-line or download a copy.) Novas, F.E., et al. (2005). A large Cretaceous theropod from Patagonia, Argentina, and the evolution of carcharodontosaurids. Naturwissenschaften, 92. Ortega, F., F. Escaso and J.L. Sanz (1976). A bizarre humped Carcharodontosauria (Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of Spain. Nature Letters, Vol.467|9. Sereno, P.C. and S.L. Brusatte (2008). Basal abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods from the Lower Cretaceous Elrhaz Formation of Niger. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 53(1). General Carcharodontosaurids Candeiro, C.R.A. and D.K. Tanke (2008). A pathological Late Cretaceous carcharodontosaurid tooth from Minas Gerais, Brazil. Bulletin of Geosciences, Vol.83,3. dos Anjos Candeiro, C., et al. (2018). Paleobiogeographic evolution and distribution of Carcharodontosauridae (Dinosauria, Theropoda) during the middle Cretaceous of North Africa. Papeis Avulsos de Zoologia, Vol.58: e20185829. Lu, J., et al. (2014). Paleogeographical significance of carcharodontosaurid teeth from the Early Cretaceous of Ruyang, Henan Province of central China. Historical Biology. Rayfield, E.J. (2011). Structural Performance of Tetanuran Theropod Skulls, With Emphasis on the Megalosauridae, Spinosauridae and Carcharodontosauridae. Palaeontology, Special Papers in Palaeontology, 86. Family Neovenatoridae Apesteguia, S., et al. (2016). An Unusual New Theropod with a Didactyl Manus from the Upper Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina. PLoS ONE, 11(7). Benson, R.B.J. and X. Xing (2008). The anatomy and systematic position of the theropod dinosaur Chilantiasaurus tashuikouensis Hu, 1964 from the Early Cretaceous of Alanshan, People's Republic of China. Geol.Mag., 145(6). Benson, R.B.J., M.T. Carrano and S.L. Brusatte (2010). A new clade of large-bodied predatory dinosaurs (Theropoda: Allosauroidea) that survived to the latest Mesozoic. Naturwissenschaften, 97. Zanno, L.E. and P.J. Makovicky (2013). Neovenatorid theropods are apex predators in the Late Cretaceous of North America. Nature Communications, 4:2827. General Allosauria Bakker, R.T. (1998). Brontosaur Killers: Late Jurassic Allosaurids as Sabre-Tooth Cat Analogues. Gaia, Number 15. Bates, K.T., B.J. Benson and P.L. Falkingham (2012). A computational analysis of locomotor anatomy and body mass evolution in Allosauroidea (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Paleobiology, 38(3). Brusatte, S.L. and P.C. Sereno (2008). Phylogeny of Allosauroidea (Dinosauria: Theropoda): Comparative Analysis and Resolution. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 6(2). Mateus, O. (1998). Lourinhanosaurus antunesi, A New Upper Jurassic Allosauroid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from Lourinhã, Portugal. Memorias da Academia de Ciencias de Lisboa, Vol.37. Naish, D. (2003). A definitive allosauroid (Dinosauria; Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of East Sussex. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, 114. ?Megaraptora Calvo, J.O., et al. (2004). Phylogenetic status of Megaraptor namunhuiquii Novas based on a new specimen from Neuquen, Patagonia, Argentina. Ameghiniana, 41(4). Coria, R.A. and P.J. Currie (2016). A New Megaraptoran Dinosaur (Dinosauria, Theropoda, Megaraptoridae) from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. PLoS ONE, 11(7). Martinelli, A.G., et al. (2013). Insights on the Theropod Fauna from the Uberaba Formation (Bauru Group), Minas Gerais State: New Megaraptoran Specimen from the Late Cretaceous of Brazil. Revista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia, Vol.119, Number 2. Mendez, A.H., F.E. Novas and F.V. Iori (2012). First Record of Megaraptora (Teropoda, Neovenatoridae) from Brazil. C.R. Palevol, 11. Novas, F.E. (1998). Megaraptor namunhaiquii, Gen. et Sp.Nov., A Large-Clawed, Late Cretaceous Theropod from Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 18(1). Novas, F.E., A.M.A. Rolando and F.L. Agnolin (2016). Phylogenetic relationships of the Cretaceous Gondwanan theropods Megaraptor and Australovenator: the evidence afforded by their manual anatomy. Memoirs of Museum Victoria, 74. Novas, F.E., M.D. Ezcurra and A. Lecuona (2008). Orkoraptor burkei nov.gen. et sp., a large theropod from the Maastrichtian Pari Aike Formation, Southern Patagonia, Argentina. Cretaceous Research, 29. Paulina-Carabajal, A. and P.J. Currie (2017). The Braincase of the Theropod Dinosaur Murusraptor: Osteology, Neuroanatomy and Comments on the Paleobiological Implications of Certain Endocranial Features. Ameghiniana, 54. Porfiri, J.D., D. Dos Santos and J.O. Calvo (2007). New Information on Megaraptor namunhuaiquii (Theropoda: Tetanurae), Patagonia: Considerations on Paleoecological Aspects. Arquivos do Museo Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Vol.65, Number 4. Porfiri, J.D., et al. (2014). Juvenile specimen of Megaraptor (Dinosauria, Theropoda) sheds light about tyrannosauroid radiation. Cretaceous Research, 51. (Thanks to doushantuo for finding this one!) Rolando, A.M.A., et al. (2018). A supposed Gondwanana oviraptorosaur from the Albian of Brazil represents the oldest South American megaraptoran. Cretaceous Research, 84. Smith, N.D., et al. (2008). A Megaraptor-like theropod (Dinosauria: Tetanurae) in Australia: support for faunal exchange across eastern and western Gondwana in the Mid-Cretaceous. Proc.R.Soc. B, 275. White, M.A., et al. (2015). The dentary of Australovenator wintonensis (Theropoda, Megaraptoridae); implications for megaraptorid dentition. PeerJ, 3:e1512. White, M.A., et al. (2015). Forearm Range of Motion in Australovenator wintonensis (Theropoda, Megaraptoridae). PLoS ONE, 10(9). White, M.A., et al. (2013). New Australovenator Hind Limb Elements Pertaining to the Holotype Reveal the Most Complete Neovenatorid Leg. PLoS ONE, 8(7). White, M.A., et al. (2012). New Forearm Elements Discovered of Holotype Specimen Australovenator wintonensis from Winton, Queensland, Australia. PLoS ONE, 7(6). Yun, C.-g. (2015). Comments on juvenile Megaraptor specimen and systematic positions of megaraptoran theropods. PeerJ Preprints, 851v1. Zanno, L.E. and P.J. Mackovicky (2014). Before Tyrannosaurs Reigned. Natural History, July/August 2014. Division Coelurosauria Novas, F.E., et al. (2012). New Patagonian Cretaceous theropod sheds light about the early radiation of Coelurosauria. Rev.Mus. Argentino Cienc.Nat., n.s., 14(1). Rauhut, O.W.M. and X. Xu (2005). The Small Theropod Dinosaurs Tugulusaurus and Phaedrolosaurus from the Early Cretaceous of Xinjiang, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 25(1). Rauhut, O.W.M., et al. (2012). Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany. PNAS, Vol.109, Number 29. Clade Tyrannoraptora Superfamily Tyrannosauroidea Non-Tyrannosaurid Tyrannosauroids Family Coeluridae Choiniere, J.N., et al. (2013). A juvenile specimen of a new coelurosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Middle-Late Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Xinjiang, People's Republic of China. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2013.781067. Choiniere, J.N., et al. (2010). A Basal Coelurosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoa) from the Late Jurassic (Oxfordian) of the Shishugou Formation in Wucaiwan, People's Republic of China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(6). De Klerk, W.J., et al. (2000). A New Coelurosaurian Dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of South Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(2). Martinez, R.D. and F.E. Novas (2006). Aniksosaurus darwini gen. et sp.nov., a new coelurosaurian theropod from the Early Late Cretaceous of Central Patagonia, Argentina. Rev.Mus. Argentino Cienc.Nat., n.s., 8(2). Zhang, F., et al. (2002). A juvenile coelurosaurian theropod from China indicates arboreal habits. Naturwissenschaften, 89. Family(?) Dryptosauridae Brusatte, S.L., R.B.J. Benson and M.A. Norell (2011). The Anatomy of Dryptosaurus aquilunguis (Dinosauria: Theropoda) and a Review of its Tyrannosauroid Affinities. American Museum Novitates, Number 3717. Carpenter, K., et al. (1997). Redescription of the Holotype of Dryptosaurus aquilunguis (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of New Jersey. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 17(3). Lambe, L.M. (1904). Part III. On Dryptosaurus incrassatus (Cope), from the Edmonton Series of the North West Territory. Contributions to Canadian Palaeontology, Vol.III. Yun, C.-g. (2017). Teihivenator gen.nov., A new generic name for the Tyrannosauroid Dinosaur "Laelaps" macropus (Cope, 1868; preoccupied by Koch, 1836). Journal of Zoological and Bioscience Research, Vol.4, Issue 2. Family incertae sedis/indet. Averianov, A.O. and H.-D. Sues (2012). Skeletal Remains of Tyrannosauroidea (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Bissekty Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Turonian) of Uzbekistan. Cretaceous Research, 34. Brownstein, C.D. (2017). A tyrannosauroid metatarsus from the Merchantville Formation of Delaware increases the diversity of non-tyrannosaurid tyrannosauroids on Appalachia. PeerJ, 5:e4123. (Thanks to Troodon for locating this one!) Brusatte, S.L., et al. (2016). New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs. PNAS, Vol.113, Number 13. Carr, T.D., T.E. Williamson and D.R. Schwimmer (2005). A New Genus and Species of Tyrannosauroid from the Late Cretaceous (Middle Campanian) Demopolis Formation of Alabama. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 25(1). Dalman, S.G., S.E. Jasinski and S.G. Lucas (2017). First Occurrence of a Tyrannosauroid Dinosaur from the Lower Campanian Merchantville Formation of Delaware, USA. Memoir of the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, 16. Hutt, S., et al. (2001). A preliminary account of a new tyrannosauroid theropod from the Wessex Formation (Early Cretaceous) of southern England. Cretaceous Research, 22. Jovanelly, T.J. and L. Lane (2012). Comparisons of the Functional Morphology of Appalachiosaurus and Albertosaurus. The Opens Geology Journal, 2012,6. Li, D., et al. (2010). A longirostrine tyrannosauroid from the Early Cretaceous of China. Proc.R.Soc. B, 277. Rauhut, O.W.M. (2003). A Tyrannosauroid Dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal. Palaeontology, Vol.46, Part 5. Yun, C.-g. (2017). Teihivenator gen.nov., a new generic name for the Tyrannosauroid Dinosaur "Laelaps" macropus (Cope, 1868; preoccupied by Koch, 1836). Journal of Zoological and Bioscience Research, Vol.4, Issue 2. Family Proceratosauridae Averianov, A.O., S.A. Krasnolutskii and S.V. Ivantsov (2010). A New Basal Coelurosaur (Dinosauria: Theropda) from the Middle Jurassic of Siberia. Proceedings of the Zoological Institute RAS, Vol.314, Number 1. Foster, J.R. and D.J. Chure (2000). An Ilium of a Juvenile Stokesosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic: Kimmeridgian), Meade County, South Dakota. BYU Geology Studies, Vol.45. Rauhut, O.W.M., A.C. Milner and S. Moore-Fay (2010). Cranial osteology and phylogenetic position of the theropod dinosaur Proceratosaurus bradleyi (Woodward, 1910) from the Middle Jurassic of England. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 158. Xu, X., et al. (2012). A gigantic feathered dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous of China. Nature, Vol.484. Xu, X., et al. (2006). A basal tyrannosauroid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of China. Nature, Vol.439. Xu, X., et al. (2004). Basal tyrannosauroids from China and evidence for protofeathers in tyrannosauroids. Nature, Vol.431. Family Tyrannosauridae Subfamily Albertosaurinae Bell, P.R. and P.J. Currie (2014). Albertosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) material from an Edmontosaurus bonebed (Horseshoe Canyon Formation) near Edmonton; clarification of palaeogeographic distribution. Can.J. Earth Sci., 51. Bradley, G. (2015). Assessing Social Behaviour, Ontogenetic Change and Taxonomic Status in a Juvenile Gorgosaurus libratus (Dinosauria; Theropoda; Tyrannosauridae): A multidisciplinary analysis. Masters Thesis - University of Alberta. (227 pages) Carr, T.D., T.E. Williamson and D.R. Schwimmer (2005). A New Genus and Species of Tyrannosauroid from the Late Cretaceous (Middle Campanian) Demopolis Formation of Alabama. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 25(1). Currie, P.J. (2003). Cranial anatomy of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48(2). Currie, P.J. (1998). Possible Evidence of Gregarious Behavior in Tyrannosaurids. Gaia, Number 15. Dalman, S.G. and S.G. Lucas (2017). On the Dentary in the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum of Gorgosaurus libratus (Theropoda: Tyrannosauridae) from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Alberta, Canada. Memoir of the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, 16. Johnston, K.E. and P.J. Currie (2015). Ontogeny of Albertosaurus sarcophagus: speedy adults or fast juveniles, how the development of the species affected the biomechanics and implications for hunting strategies. Jovanelly, T.J. and L. Lane (2012). Comparisons of the Functional Morphology of Appalachiosaurus and Albertosaurus. The Opens Geology Journal, 2012,6. Lambe, L.M. (1917). The Cretaceous Theropodous Dinosaur Gorgosaurus. Canada Department of Mines - Geological Survey, Memoir 100, Number 83, Geological Series. Matthew, W.D. and B. Brown (1923). Preliminary Notices of Skeletons and Skulls of Deinodontidae from the Cretaceous of Alberta. American Museum Novitates, Number 89. Subfamily Deinodontinae Matthew, W.D. and B. Brown (1923). Preliminary Notices of Skeletons and Skulls of Deinodontidae from the Cretaceous of Alberta. American Museum Novitates, Number 89. Matthew, W.D. and B. Brown (1922). The Family Deinodontidae, With Notice of a New Genus from the Cretaceous of Alberta. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol.XLVI, Article VI. Subfamily incertae sedis Brusatte, S.L., et al. (2016). New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs. PNAS, Vol.113, Number 13. Thomson, T.J., R.B. Irmis and M.A. Loewen (2013). First occurrence of a tyrannosaurid dinosaur from the Mesaverde Group (Neslen Formation) of Utah: Implications for upper Campanian Laramidian biogeography. Cretaceous Research, 43. Subfamily Tyrannosaurinae Tribe Alioramini? Bever, G.S., et al. (2013). The Braincase Anatomy of the Late Cretaceous dinosaur Alioramus (Theropoda, Tyrannosauroidea). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 376. Bever, G.S., et al. (2011). Variation, Variability, and the Origin of the Avian Endocranium: Insights from the Anatomy of Alioramus altai (Theropoda: Tyrannosauroidea). PLoS ONE, 6(8). Brusatte, S.L., et al. (2012). The Osteology of Alioramus, a Gracile and Long-Snouted Tyrannosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 366. (85 MB download) Brusatte, S.L., et al. (2009). A long-snouted, multihorned tyrannosaurid from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. PNAS, Vol.106, Number 41. Gold, M.E.L., S.L Brusatte and M.A. Norell (2013). The cranial pneumatic sinuses of the tyrannosaurid Alioramus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) and the evolution of cranial pneumaticity in theropod dinosaurs. American Museum Novitates, Number 3790. Lu, J.-c., et al. (2014). A new clade of Asian Late Cretaceous long-snouted tyrannosaurids. Nature Communications, 5:3788. Tribe incertae sedis Carr, T.D. and T.E. Williamson (2010). Bistahieversor sealeyi, Gen. et Sp.Nov., A New Tyrannosauroid from New Mexico and the Origin of Deep Snouts in Tyrannosauroidea. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(1). Delcourt, R. (2017). A Subadult Maxilla of a Tyrannosauridae from the Two Medicine Formation, Montana, United States. Papeis Avulsos de Zoologia, Vol.57(9). Hone, D.W.E. and D.H. Tanke (2015). Pre- and postmortem tyrannosaurid bite marks on the remains of Daspletosaurus (Tyrannosaurinae: Theropoda) from Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. PeerJ, 3:e885. Miyashita, T., D.H. Tanke and P.J. Currie (2010). Variation in premaxillary tooth count and a developmental abnormality in a tyrannosaurid dinosaur. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 55(4). Tribe Tarbosaurini Hone, D.W.E. and M. Watabe (2010). New information on scavenging and selective feeding behaviour of tyrannosaurids. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 55(4). Hone, D.W.E., et al. (2011). A new, large tyrannosaurine theropod from the Upper Cretaceous of China. Cretaceous Research, xxx. (Article in Press) Hurum, J.H. and K. Sabath (2003). Giant theropod dinosaurs from Asia and North America: Skulls of Tarbosaurus bataar and Tyrannosaurus rex compared. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48(2). Saveliev, S.V. and V.R. Alifanov (2007). A New Study of the Brain of the Predatory Dinosaur Tarbosaurus bataar (Theropoda, Tyrannosauridae). Paleontological Journal, Vol.41, Number 3. Tsuihiji, T., et al. (2011). Cranial Osteology of a Juvenile Specimen of Tarbosaurus bataar (Theropoda, Tyrannosauridae) from the Nemegt Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Bugin Tsav, Mongolia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 31(3). Tribe Tyannosaurini Barrick, R.E. and W.J. Showers (1994). Thermophysiology of Tyrannosaurus rex: Evidence from Oxygen Isotopes. Science, Vol.265. Bates, K.T. and P.L. Falkingham (2012). Estimating maximum bite performance in Tyrannosaurus rex using multi-body dynamics. Biology Letters. Boatman, E.M., et al. (2014). Synchrotron Chemical and Structural Analysis of Tyrannosaurus rex Blood Vessels: The Contribution of Collagen Hypercrosslinking to Tissue Longevity. Microscopy and Microanalysis 20 (Suppl.3). Brochu, C.A. (2003). Osteology of Tyrannosaurus rex: Insights from a Nearly Complete Skeleton and High-Resolution Computed Tomographic Analysis of the Skull. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Memoir 7, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol.22, Supplement to Number 4. 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Specializations of the mandibular anatomy and dentition of Segnosaurus galbinensis (Theropoda: Therizinosauria). PeerJ, 4:e1885. Clade Pennaraptora Clade Oviraptorosauria Family Caenagnathidae Subfamily Caenagnathinae Funston, G.F., et al. (2015). New material of the large-bodied caenagnathid Caenagnathus collinsi from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada. Cretaceous Research, 54. Lamanna, M.C., et al. (2014). A New Large-Bodied Oviraptorosaurian Theropod Dinosaur from the Latest Cretaceous of Western North America. PLoS ONE, 9(3). Subfamily Elmisaurinae Currie, P.J., G.F. Funston and H. Osmolska (2016). New specimens of the crested theropod dinosaur Elmisaurus rarus from Mongolia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(1). Funston, G.F. and P.J. Currie (2014). A previously undescribed caenagnathid mandible from the Late Campanian of Alberta, and insights into the diet of Chirostenotes pergracilis (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria). Can.J. Earth Sci., 51. Funston, G.F., P.J. Currie and M.F. Burns (2016). New elmisaurine specimens from North America and their relationship to the Mongolian Elmisaurus rarus. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(1). Sues, H.-D. and A. Averianov (2015). New material of Caenagnathasia martinsoni (Dinosaura: Theropoda: Oviraptorosauria) from the Bissekty Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Turonian) of Uzbekistan. Cretaceous Research, 54. Yao, X., et al. (2015). Caenagnathasia sp. (Theropoda: Oviraptorosauria) from the Iren Dabasu Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Campanian) of Erenhot, Nei Mongol, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 53(4). Subfamily incertae sedis Makovicky, P.J. and H.-D. Sues (1998). Anatomy and Phylogenetic Relationships of the Theropod Dinosaur Microvenator celer from the Lower Cretaceous of Montana. American Museum Novitates, Number 3240. Naish, D. and D.M. Martill (2002). A reappraisal of Thecocoelurus daviesi (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Early Cretaceous of the Isle of Wight. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, 113. Sullivan, R.M., S.E. Jasinski and M.P.A. Vantomme (2011). A New Caenagnathid Ojoraptorsaurus boerei, N.Gen.,N.Sp. (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria), from the Upper Cretaceous Ojo Alamo Formation (Naashoibito Member), San Juan Basin, New Mexico. In: Fossil Record 3. Sullivan, et al. (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 53. Zanno, L.E. and S.D. Sampson (2005). A New Oviraptorosaur (Theropoda, Maniraptora) from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian) of Utah. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 25(4). Family Caudipteridae dyke, G.J. and M.A. Norell (2005). Caudipteryx as a non-avialan theropod rather than a flightless bird. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(1). Feduccia, A. and S.A. Czerkas (2015). Testing the neoflightlessness hypothesis: propatagium reveals flying ancestry of oviraptorosaurs. J.Ornithol., published on-line. He, T., X.-L. Wang and Z.-H. Zhou (2008). A New Genus and Species of Caudipterid Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Western Liaoning, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 46(3). Zhou, Z.-H., et al. (2000). Important Features of Caudipteryx - Evidence from Two Nearly Complete New Specimens. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 38(4). Family Oviraptoridae Balanoff, A.M. and M.A. Norell (2012). Osteology of Khaan mckennai (Oviraptorosauria, Theropoda). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 372. (51.3 MB download) Balanoff, A.M., et al. (2009). Cranial Osteology of the Theropod Dinosaur Incisivosaurus gauthieri (Theropoda: Oviraptorosauria). American Museum Novitates, Number 3651. Clark, J.M., M.A. Norell and T. Rowe (2002). Cranial Anatomy of Citipati osmolskae (Theropoda, Oviraptorosauria), and a Reinterpretation of the Holotype of Oviraptor philoceratops. American Museum Novitates, Number 3364. Clark, J.M., M.A. Norell and L.M. Chiappe (1999). An Oviraptorid Skeleton from the Late Cretaceous of Ukhaa Tolgod, Preserved in an Avianlike Brooding Position Over an Oviraptorid Nest. American Museum Novitates, Number 3265. Elzanowski, A. (1999). A Comparison of the Jaw Skeleton in Theropods and Birds, with a Description of the Palate in the Oviraptoridae. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, Number 89. Fanti, F., P.J. Currie and D. Badamgarav (2012). New Specimens of Nemegtomaia from the Baruungoyot and Nemegt Formations (Late Cretaceous) of Mongolia. PLoS ONE, 7(2). Kundrat, M. and J. Janacek (2007). Cranial pneumatization and auditory perceptions of the oviraptorid dinosaur Conchoraptor gracilis (Theropoda, Maniraptora) from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. Naturwissenschaften. Lu, J., et al. (2016). A Late Cretaceous diversification of Asian oviraptorid dinosaurs: new evidence from a new species preserved in an unusual posture. Scientific Reports, 6:35780. Lu, J., et al. (2015). A New Oviraptorid Dinosaur Dinosaur (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria) from the Late Cretaceous of Southern China and Its Paleobiogeographical Implications. Scientific Reports, 5:11490. Lu, J., et al. (2004). New Oviraptorid Dinosaur (Dinosauria: Oviraptorosauria) from the Nemegt Formation of Southwestern Mongolia. Bull.Natn.Sci.Mus., Tokyo, Series C, 30. Norell, M.A., et al. (2018). A Second Specimen of Citipati osmolskae Associated with a Nest of Eggs from Ukhaa Tolgod, Omnogov Aimag, Mongolia. American Museum Novitates, Number 3899. (49.33MB - Note: a link to a 119.4MB High resolution version is available.)(Thanks to Troodon for pointing me to this one!) Wang, S., et al. (2013). A new oviraptorid (Dinosaura: Theropda) from the Upper Cretaceous of southern China. Zootaxa, 3640(2). Xu, X., et al. (2013). A new oviraptoroid from the Upper Cretaceous of Nei Mongol, China, and its stratigraphic implications. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 51(2). General Oviraptorosauria Agnolin, F. and A.G. Martinelli (2007). Did oviraptorosaurs (Dinosauria; Theropoda) inhabit Argentina? Cretaceous Research, 28. Maryanska, T., H. Osmolska and M. Wolsan (2002). Avialian status for Oviraptorosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 47(1). Persons, W.S., P.J. Currie and M.A. Norell (2014). Oviraptorosaur tail forms and functions. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(3). Rolando, A.M.A., et al. (2018). A supposed Gondwanana oviraptorosaur from the Albian of Brazil represents the oldest South American megaraptoran. Cretaceous Research, 84. Clade Paraves (excluding Avialae) Family Dromaeosauridae Subfamily Dromaeosaurinae Arbour, V.M., et al. (2016). The furculae of the dromaeosaurid dinosaur Dakotaraptor steini are trionychid turtle entoplastra. PeerJ, 4:e1691. Brinkman, D.L., R.L. Cifelli and N.J. Czaplewski (1998). First Occurrence of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Antlers Formation (Lower Cretaceous: Aptian-Albian) of Oklahoma. Oklahoma Geological Survey, Bulletin 146. Colbert, E.H. and D.A. Russell (1969). The Small Cretaceous Dinosaur Dromaeosaurus. American Museum Novitates, Number 2380. DePalma, R.A., et al. (2015). The first giant raptor (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae) from the Hell Creek Formation. University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Number 14. Fowler, D.W., et al. (2011). The Predatory Ecology of Deinonychus and the Origin of Flapping in Birds. PLoS ONE, 6(12). Gignac, P.M., et al. (2010). A Description of Deinonychus antirrhopus Bite Marks and Estimates of Bite Force Using Tooth Indentation Simulations. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(4). Grellet-Tinner, G. and P. Makovicky (2006). A possible egg of the dromaeosaur Deinonychus antirrhopus: phylogenetic and biological implications. Can.J. Earth Sci., 43. Ostrom, J.H. (1969). Osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus, an Unusual Theropod from the Lower Cretaceous of Montana. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Bulletin 30. Parsons, W.L. and K.M. Parsons (2015). Morphological Variations within the Ontogeny of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Theropoda, Dromaeosauridae). PLoS ONE, 10(4). Parsons, W.L. and K.M. Parsons (2009). Further Descriptions of the Osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Saurischia, Theropoda). Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, Vol.38. Porfiri, J.D., J.O. Calvo and D. Dos Santos (2011). A new small deinonychosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina. Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, 83(1). Roach, B.T. and D.L. Brinkman (2007). A Reevaluation of Cooperative Pack Hunting and Gregariousness in Deinonychus antirrhopus and Other Nonavian Theropod Dinosaurs. Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, 48(1). Sues, H.-D. and A. Averianov (2014). Dromaeosauridae (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Bissekty Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Turonian) of Uzbekistan and the phylogenetic position of Itemirus medullaris Kurzanov, 1976. Cretaceous Research, 51. Subfamily Halszkaraptorinae Cau, A. and D. Madzia (2018). Redescription and affinities of Hulsanpes perlei (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia. PeerJ, 6:e4868. Turner, A.H., D. Pol and M.A. Norell (2011). Anatomy of Mahakala omnogovae (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae), Tögrögiin Shiree, Mongolia. American Museum Novitates, Number 3722. Subfamily incertae sedis/indet. Allain, R. and P. Taquet (2000). A New Genus of Dromaeosauridae (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of France. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(2). Case, J.A., J.E. Martin and M. Reguero (2007). A dromaeosaur from the Maastrichtian of James Ross Island and the Late Cretaceous Antarctic dinosaur fauna. U.S. Geological Survey and The National Academies, USGS OF-2007-1047, Short Research Paper 083. Pittman, M., et al. (2015). The first dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous Bayan Gobi Formation of Nei Mongol, China. PeerJ, 3:e1480. Turner, A.H., S.H. Hwang and M.A. Norell (2007). A Small Derived Theropod from Öösh, Early Cretaceous, Baykhangor, Mongolia. American Museum Novitates, Number 3557. Turner, A.H., et al. (2007). A Basal Dromaeosaurid and Size Evolution Preceding Avian Flight. Science, Vol.317. Subfamily Microraptorinae Chatterjee, S. and R.J. Templin (2007). Biplane wing planform and flight performance of the feathered dinosaur Microraptor gui. PNAS, Vol.104, Number 5. Gianechini, F.A., F.L. Agnolin and M.D. Ezcurra (2011). A reassessment of the purported venom delivery system of the bird-like raptor Sinornithosaurus. Palaontol. Z., 85. Gong, E.-P., et al. (2012). A new species of Microraptor from the Jehol Biota of northeastern China. Palaeoworld, 21. Han, G., et al. (2014). A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance. Nature Communications, 5:4382. Hone, D.W.E., et al. (2010). The Extent of the Preserved Feathers on the Four-Winged Dinosaur Microraptor gui under Ultraviolet Light. PLoS ONE, 5(2). Hwang, S.H., et al. (2002). New Specimens of Microraptor zhaoianus (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae) from Northeastern China. American Museum Novitates, Number 3381. Li, Q., et al. (2012). Reconstruction of Microraptor and the Evolution of Iridescent Plumage. Science, Vol. 335. Longrich, N.R. and P.J. Currie (2009). A microraptorine (Dinosauria-Dromaeosauridae) from the Late Cretaceoous of North America. PNAS Early Edition. Lu, J. and S.L. Brusatte (2015). A large, short-armed, winged dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Early Cretaceous of China and its implications for feather evolution. Scientific Reports, 5:11775. O'Connor, J., Z. Zhou and X. Xu (2011). Additional specimen of Microraptor provides unique evidence of dinosaurs preying on birds. PNAS, Vol.108, Number 49. Pei, R., et al. (2014). A new specimen of Microraptor (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae) from the Lower Cretaceous of western Liaoning, China. American Museum Novitates, Number 3821. Poust, A.W. (2014). Description and Ontogenetic Assessment of a New Jehol Microraptorine. Masters Thesis - Montana State University. (114 pages) Xing, L., et al. (2013). Piscivory in the Feathered Dinosaur Microraptor. Evolution, Brief Communications. Xu, X. and X.-C. Wu (2001). Cranial morphology of Sinornithosaurus millenii Xu, et al. 1999 (Dinosauria: Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae) from the Yixian Formation of Liaoning, China. Can.J. Earth Sci., 38. Xu, X., Z. Zhou and X. Wang (2000). The smallest known non-avian theropod dinosaur. Nature, Vol.408. Xu, X., et al. (2003). Four-winged dinosaurs from China. Nature, Vol.421. Subfamily Saurornitholestinae Brownstein, C. (2018). Diversity of raptor dinosaurs in southeastern North America revealed by the first definite record from North Carolina. PeerJ Preprints. (Not peer reviewed) Burnham, D.A., et al. (2000). Remarkable New Birdlike Dinosaur (Theropoda: Maniraptora) from the Upper Cretaceous of Montana. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Number 13. (29.3MB download) Currie, P.J. and D.J. Varricchio (2004). 4. A New Dromaeosaurid from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Alberta, Canada. In: Feathered Dragons. Currie, P.J., et al. (eds.), Indiana University Press. Sullivan, R.M. (2006). Saurornitholestes robustus, N.Sp. (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous Kirtland Formation (De-Na-Zin Member), San Juan Basin, New Mexico. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior. Lucas, S.G. and R.M. Sullivan (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Sullivan, R.M. and S.G. Lucas (2000). First Occurrence of Saurornitholestes (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous of New Mexico. In: Dinosaurs of New Mexico. Lucas, S.G. and A.B. Heckert (eds.). New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 17. Subfamily Unenlagiinae Currie, P.J. and A.P. Carabajal (2012). A New Specimen of Austroraptor cabazai Novas, Pol, Canale, Porfiri and Calvo, 2008 (Dinosauria, Theropoda, Unenlagiidae) from the Latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Rio N*gro , Argentina. Ameghiniana, 49(4). Egli, F.B., et al. (2017). Osteology of the unenlagiid theropod Neuquenraptor argentinus from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 62(3). Gianechini, F.A., P.J. Makovicky and S. Apesteguia (2011). The teeth of the unenlagiine theropod Buitreraptor from the Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina, and the unusual dentition of Gondwanan dromaeosaurids. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 56(2). Gianechini, F.A., et al. (2018). Postcranial skeletal anatomy of the holotype and referred specimens of Buiteraptor gonzalezorum Makovicky, Apesteguia and Agnolin 2005 (Theropoda, Dromaeosauridae), from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. PeerJ, 6:e4558. (27.7MB)(Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Makovicky, P.J., S. Apesteguia and F.L. Agnolin (2005). The earliest dromaeosaurid theropod from South America. Nature (Letters), Vol.437. Novas, F.E. and D. Pol (2005). New evidence of deinonychosaurian dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia. Nature, Vol.433. Novas, F.E. and F.L. Agnolin (2004). Unquillosaurus ceibali Powell, a giant maniraptoran (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Argentina. Rev.Mus. Argentino Cienc.Nat. n.s., 6(1). Novas, F.E., et al. (2008). A bizarre Cretaceous theropod dinosaur from Patagonia and the evolution of Gondwanan dromaeosaurids. Proc.R.Soc.B., published online. Subfamily Velocipraptorninae Barsbold, R. and H. Osmolska (1999). The skull of Velociraptor (Theropoda) from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 44(2). Godefroit, P., et al. (2008). A New Species of Velociraptor (Dinosauria: Dromaeosauridae) from the Upper Cretaceous of Northern China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 28(2). Hone, D.W.E., et al. (2010). New evidence for a trophic relationship between the dinosaurs Velociraptor and Protoceratops. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 291. Kiernan, C.R. and D.R. Schwimmer (2004). First Record of a Velociraptorine Theropod (Tetanurae, Dromaeosauridae) from the Eastern Gulf Coastal United States. The Mosasaur, 7. Norell, M.A. and P.J. Mackovicky (1999). Important Features of the Dromaeosaurid Skeleton II: Information from Newly Collected Specimens of Velociraptor mongolensis. American Museum Novitates, Number 3282. Norell, M.A., et al. (2006). A New Dromaeosaurid Theropod from Ukhaa Tolgod (Omnogov, Mongolia). American Museum Novitates, Number 3545. Sues, H.-D. and A. Averianov (2014). Dromaeosauridae (Dinosauria: Theropda) from the Bissekty Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Turonian) of Uzbekistan and the phylogenetic position of Itemirus medullaris Kurzanov, 1976. Cretaceous Research, 51. Sweetman, S.C. (2004). The first record of velociraptorine dinosaurs (Saurischia, Theropoda) from the Wealden (Early Cretaceous, Barremian) of southern England. Cretaceous Research, 25. Turner, A.H., P.J. Mackovicky and M.A. Norell (2007). Feather Quill Knobs in the Dinosaur Velociraptor. Brevia - Science, Vol.317. Van Der Lubbe, T., U. Richter and N. Knotschke (2009). Velociraptorine dromaeosaurid teeth from the Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) of Germany. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 54(3). Xu, X., et al. (2015). The taxonomic status of the Late Cretaceous dromaeosaurid Linheraptor exquisitus and its implications for dromaeosaurid systematics. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 53(1). Xu, X., et al. (2010). A new dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous Wulansuhai Formation of Inner Mongolia, China. Zootaxa, 2403. General Dromaeosauridae Senter, P. (2007). A method for distinguishing dromaeosaurid manual unguals from pedal "sickle claws". Bull. Gunma Mus.Natu.Hist., (11). Turner, A.H., P.J. Makovicky and M.A. Norell (2012). A review of dromaeosaurid systematics and paravian phylogeny. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 371. (53 MB download) Family Troodontidae Subfamily incertae sedis Barsbold, R., H. Osmolska and S.M. Kurzanov (1987). On a New Troodontid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Early Cretaceous of Mongolia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol.32, Numbers 1-2. Gao, C.-l., et al. (2012). A Second Soundly Sleeping Dragon: New Anatomical Details of the Chinese Troodontid Mei long with Implications for Phylogeny and Taphonomy. PLoS ONE, 7(9). Hu, D., et al. (2009). A pre-Archaeopteryx troodontid theropod from China with long feathers on the metatarsus. Nature, Vol.461. Kurzanov, S.M. and H. Osmolska (1991). Tochisaurus nemegtensis Gen. et Sp.Nov., A New Troodontid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from Mongolia. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol.36, Number 1. Lu, J.-C., et al. (2010). A new troodontid theropod from the Late Cretaceous of central China, and the radiation of Asian troodontids. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 55(3). Senter, P., et al. (2010). A New Troodontid Theropod Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous of Utah. PLoS ONE, 5(12). Tsuihiji, T., et al. (2016). New material of a troodontid theropod (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from the Lower Cretaceous of Mongolia. Historical Biology, Vol.28, Numbers 1-2. Xu, X., et al. (2017). Mosaic evolution in an asymmetrically feathered troodontid dinosaur with transitional features. Nature Communications, 8:14972. Zanno, L.E., et al. (2011). A New Troodontid Theropod, Talos sampsoni gen. et sp.nov., from the Upper Cretaceous Western Interior Basin of North America. PLoS ONE, 6(9). Subfamily Sinovenatorinae Shen, C., et al. (2017). A New Troodontid Dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, China. Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol.91, Number 3. Xu, X. and M.A. Norell (2004). A new troodontid dinosaur from China with avian-like sleeping posture. Nature (Letters), Vol.431. Xu, X. and X. Wang (2004). A New Troodontid (Theropoda: Troodontidae) from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Western Liaoning, China. Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol.78, Number 1. Subfamily Troodontinae Averianov, A.O. and H.-D. Sues (2007). A New Troodontid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Cenomanian of Uzbekistan, With a Review of Troodontid Records from the Territories of the Former Soviet Union. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(1). Bever, G.S. and M.A. Norell (2009). The Perinate Skull of Byronosaurus (Troodontidae) with Observations on the Cranial Ontogeny of Paravian Theropods. American Museum Novitates, Number 3657. Fiorillo, A.R. (2008). On The Occurrence of Exceptionally Large Teeth of Troodon (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from the Late Cretaceous of Northern Alaska. Palaios, Vol.23. Fiorillo, A.R., et al. (2009). Description of Two Troodon Braincases from the Prince Creek Formation (Upper Cretaceous), North Slope, Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 29(1). Gilmore, C.W. (1931). A New Species of Troodont Dinosaur from the Lance Formation of Wyoming. No. 2875 - Proceedings U.S. National Museum, Vol.79, Article 9. Holtz, T.R., D.L. Brinkman and C.L. Chandler (1998). Denticle Morphometrics and a Possibly Omnivorous Feeding Habit for the Theropod Dinosaur Troodon. Gaia, No.15. Jackson, F.D., J.R. Horner and D.J. Varricchio (2010). A study of a Troodon egg containing embryonic remains using epifluorescence microscopy and other techniques. 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