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Found 153 results

  1. Sponge or concretion?

    I assumed this item was a concretion. I regularly find fist-sized concretions in the Argentine member of the Kansas City group (Pennsylvanian subsystem). But looking this morning at a comment by @WhodamanHD here I wondered whether what I have is a sponge. The specimen is about 6 inches across and 4.5 inches from top to bottom. What do you think?
  2. Arizona Sponge

    I found a sponge in the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation north of Payson, Arizona. It may be the same species as an earlier find although instead of pancake form it is a conical form: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/82186-knocking-about-the-naco-pennsylvanian-sponges-and-corals/&tab=comments#comment-871386 The first photo is of the convex outer surface. Part of top is broken off. Longest length of the sponge is 8cm. Any ideas as to identity? @Arizona Chris See photos in additional posts since I am doing this on a phone and cannot reduce file size.
  3. Cap-Gris-Nez: sponge?

    Hi all, Found this at the beach in Cap-Gris-Nez, France. The fossils there are usually Jurassic, but I'm not sure if this one is from the same layers. Looks like it might be a sponge to me? Maybe not. Looking forward to your opinions, Max
  4. I have had these in my collection and just looking for a confirmation that they are the Pennsylvanian sponge Regispongia contorta from Palo Pinto limestone of Cisco, Texas.
  5. From the Great Limestone, Pendleian (Upper Mississippian) of County Durham, UK. One for @Spongy Joe and any other sponge experts out there. There appear to be no sponges (apart from Chaetetes) recorded from this well researched limestone but I've collected over thirty over the past few years. There are several different types, generally fossilised as broken fragments though these can be quite large (several inches across). This one is a curved sheet, like part of a vase or dish, about 10 - 15mm thick. The outer (convex) layer contains a good proportion of spicules showing five (and a few six) rays so could it be a heteractinid of some sort? The preservation is mostly calcite, perhaps original. Scale bar is 1cm long. Vertical section, showing disposition of tangential sections below. (specimen no. Sp. 13) Tangential section, cutting through outer surface on right and bottom (the orange layer, with smaller spicules than the internal ones). Closeups of tangential sections. Several five rayed spicules are visible along the edges (i.e. in the outer layer).
  6. Branching sponge

    I took a short trip to the ditch in the Kimmeridgian the other day between shifts and spent a couple of hours digging away, this time to practically no avail. On the way up the ditch back to the car, however, I noticed something which had slipped down from above recently. A good portion of the branching sponge, Cylindrophyma milleporata. It's now residing on the floor in my display room.
  7. Another sponge

    I posted a little report a few days ago about my latest outing to the Danube Valley and now I'm adding this as a sort of after-thought. I had already deposited this sponge in its unprepared condition in the dregs crate since I just didn't have the inclination to clean the matrix out of the interior. Sponges are anyway just a byproduct of my search for ammonites and I always keep telling myself you've already got enough of the things. Well, my grandson was over for a visit the day before yesterday and he spotted it. Now he just loves to putter around in the workshop when he's here, and since we had some time on our hands I figured I could let him have a go at it. He did a pretty good job at hollowing it out before his mother came to pick him up, so I thought I might just as well finish it off. Today I sat down to scrape off the last bits with the stylus and it suddenly broke up into a few pieces. No problem. Just glued them back together and finished it off with the air abrader. I believe it was worth it in the end, since I believe I have a genus which I don't have in the collection yet. I'm not really sure, but at least it looks that way. Sphenaulax sp. ? from the late Jurassic Kimmeridgian. Length: 10cm. Diameter: 12cm.
  8. Ordovician sponge?

    I just pulled this out of a box of old fossils, but I'm not exactly sure where I originally found it. I think it is from the Carter's limestone, middle Ordovician, in the Nashville, TN area. It has a similar shape and size (~2 cm dia) to Hindia, but I have not seen anything else with this distinctive pattern of parallel criss-crossing ridges. Any ideas? Thanks
  9. Sponge or Coral?

    At first I thought this one was a rock, but looking at it closer it looks like it could either be a coral or a sponge, or a rock with holes in it. You guy know what it is?
  10. I found this along the Fox River in Elgin, IL. At first I thought it was a stromatoporoid fossil (I find them everywhere in this area), but upon closer inspection I couldn't see anything that looked like pillars or laminae. Someone suggested chaetetid sponge, or a stromatoporoid that was distorted by silicification. I can't find any photos that look like my spec. except dino bone and we don't have those in northern Illinois. Is it a natural formation, crazy looking oolites? I'm totally stumped! More pics
  11. Coral? Mineralization?

    Found in a small stream in south east BC Canada. About 2km west of continental divide. It's very heavy for its size. The filaments have segments on many of them and have and organic appearance. Location would suggest Devonian or Permian I'm guessing. It's hard to know with fast flowing creek finds this high in the Rocky Mountains. Any info or ideas be appreciated. Cheers.
  12. sponge/coral/sea plant

    2 photos of this. is 2.5 cm tall, in the area which is 3-5million years range i found also a lot of the 3rd photo, oysters and other fossillized stuff.
  13. what is this sponge

    Found it in Oligocene strata in Mississippi. Bay Springs, MS
  14. Cambrian Sponge?

    I apologize that this is just one photo taken by my phone, but that is all I have to use at the moment. This fossil (about 6 cm long) is from the middle Cambrian Spence Shale of Oneida Narrows, Idaho. I am leaning towards a sponge? Does anyone have any idea what this is? Thanks for the help!
  15. Regispongia Sponge fossils.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Regispongia Sponge fossils Bangor Limestone Formation in north Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,0000,000 yrs old) Sponges, the members of the phylum Porifera (meaning "pore bearer"), are the basalmost clade of animals, as sister of the diploblasts. They are multicellular parazoan organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells. Sponges have unspecialized cells that can transform into other types and that often migrate between the main cell layers and the mesohyl in the process. Sponges do not have nervous, digestive or circulatory systems. Instead, most rely on maintaining a constant water flow through their bodies to obtain food and oxygen and to remove wastes. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Porifera Class: Calcarea Order: Heteractinida Family: Wewokellidae Genus: Regispongia
  16. Id like your opinion on this one....

    Hi All, This is one of a kind - we found only ONE of these in 250 pounds of Permian limestone that we reduced in the acid bath over the past few months. Its a lovely thing, I think its a stellate miniature ins branching sponge, but Id like your opinion. Its hollow inside the main tube, and no pits or chambers like a bryozoan. Anyone seen a tiny sponge like this? Here is top and bottom shots: (20 layer stacks!) Your opinion is appreciated!
  17. Fossil coral or sponge?

    I was doing some fall work in the garden and I dug a hole deeper than usual to start a compost pile and this was in the ground. It ppears to be coral or something. Can anyone see an outline or give any advice? I didn’t try to clean it as it seemed to be fragile. Thanks!
  18. Coral or Sponge?

    Hello, I received this specimen that I believe is a fossilized coral or perhaps a fossilized sponge and am looking for help in identifying the species and age for a museums collection. Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks, Holly
  19. What is this?

    A few months ago I was helped here to identify a clam fossil and now near the same area I have found this. It doesn't match any images that I have found searching. Thank you.
  20. Coral or Sponge?

    Hello! I collected this rounded stone in Southern Ohio, actually to paint on originally, and became enamored with what appears to be a fossil algae on top so kept in in my collection. Recently I inspected it through a loupe and noticed the sponge like pores for the first time. I tried to show in the photos that there is a transition or directional grain to the pores that I've seen in whale bones and sponges that washed ashore when I lived in the Pacific Northwest. It's sized at about six inches at the widest, and is a sandstone rather than the expected limestone. What do you think? Is it a sponge or a type of coral?
  21. Wenlock Edge, Shropshire, England

    This place is just like Wrens Nest Dudley i.e. Silurian. I like both places but find different things at each. Personally I have found more Trilobites bits at Wrens Nest. 1 - Arachnophyllum murchisoni Coral, top view 2 - Amphistrophia funiculata Brachiopod 3 - Favosites Coral 4 - Halysites Coral 5 - Heliolites Coral 6 - Kodonophyllum truncatum Solitary Coral 7 - Labechia conferta Stromatoporoid sponge 8 - Leptaena depressa Brachiopod 9 - Trepostome Bryozoa
  22. Hi all, Fort Apache sponges are quite uncommon, only one sizable specimen was obtained from over 200 pounds in rock. But it is well preserved, and show the major features of fossil sponges from the Paleozoic. To be more precise, from our first locality, where nearly all the ostracods came from - we had no sponge material at all. The second new site, a half a mile further down the trail produced this specimen from about 35 pounds in limestone. They were also with numerous bryozoans and gastropods in the same mix. The one sponge we found is a calcareous type sponge that have been preserved by silica replacement. What I dont know is if this is a part of a big flat sponge, or perhaps a section of a tubular one. Maybe some of you can ascertain that. This is the largest specimen we found, it was in a class by itself! About 4 cm long and about 1 cm thick, this fragment of a large irregular sponge had excellent pore and ostium details. A millimeter scale is at bottom. 3.5x view . A closer 7x view of its surface reveals the very "spongy" appearance of the type you might wash your car with. The holes are the pores which take in water to an interior cavity for respiration and feeding on plankton. If this was a part of a large flat sponge, those larger holes might be the osculums and the tiny surface pores the in current holes. Even closer at 20x, this shows the pore details more clearly in a massive 16 focus layers stacked image. There have been a few false alarms on these calcareous sponges. Some of the really worn down bryozoans that are wrapped around urchin spines look indeed like a tubular sponge! We continue to look. This last weekend, me and my auxilliary rock hauler - I mean my wife - packed out another 36 pounds of promising rock from the second richer locality along the Highway 260 Trail east of Payson here in Arizona. We hope to find more! Thanks for looking, its a pleasure for us to show what we have found so far!
  23. Spongebob Rex

    I posted once before on cladorhizids. A single image this time. Note scale and to show the difference between a dredged and an in-place Chondrocladia
  24. Anyone know their Ordovician sponges?

    I believe i found my first Ordovician sponge fossil while hunting road cuts. Can anyone confirm if this is an Astylospongia or something else?
  25. Unidentified

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Found on the beach in New Castle, Delaware. Known Paleozoic fossil area. Identity unknown.
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