Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'sponges'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 92 results

  1. Yesterday, Tim (Fossildude19) and myself met at our usual meeting spot and with Tim driving and his downloads playing, we headed north to a planned rendezvous with the New York Paleontological Society's outing at Cobleskill Stone Products just outside Schoharie, N.Y. The weather was gorgeous- perfect really, sunny mid-50s. Fall colors were in full swing. We drove through the northern edge of the Catskills, arriving early at our rendezvous, the parking lot at the Cobleskill Stone Company. It was my first time there since 2013. I went on two previous NY Paleontological Society outings to this site, access tightly restricted. I had wanted to return, but every year there always seemed to be a conflict. One year I recall there was a planned Fossil Forum gathering at DSR on the same day. There were many reasons I wanted to return: The quarry had the best exposure of the Kalkberg Formation I've ever encountered. The Kalkberg is Lower Devonian, part of the Helderberg Group. Marine fossils are especially abundant and well preserved. The biodiversity is exceptional. There are many species of brachiopods, plus corals, nautiloids, bryozoans, the sponge, Hindia, and trilobites. Since the quarry is infrequently hunted, many specimens can be found exposed, even weathered clean right out of the limestone. Many of my best Kalkberg fossils are from there. I was excited to be there. It is always a pleasure to be out collecting with Tim. It was his first time at this quarry. Here are a couple pictures of the quarry. Notice the bright fall colors in the background.
  2. APG Arizona Sponges

    This is a work in progress. I will be adding multiple photos over the next day or so. This is part of my Arizona Paleontology Guide. My collection of Arizona sponges. Self collected unless noted. Actinocoelia maeandrina Finks 1960 Permian Kaibab Limestone Coconino County, Arizona north of Pine. 13 cm wide. link link Other side of Actinocoelia above. Permian Kaibab Limestone Coconino County, Arizona, north of Pine. 13 cm tall. link Chaunactis olsoni Dilliard & Rigby 2001 Pennsylvanian Naco Formation northern Gila County, Arizona 10 cm wide. link Pennsylvanian Naco Formation Roberts Mesa, Gila County, Arizona Sponge is 5 cm across. Link Detail of above Chaunactis. 5 cm. Ensiferites brandenburgi Rigby 1979. Link Devonian Percha Formation Brandenburg Mountain, Pinal County, Arizona 64mm wide. Detail of above. Spicules average 1 mm across. Haplistion sp. photo. Young & Young 1877 Link Rigby, J. Keith, and Walter L. Manger. “Morrowan Lithistid Demosponges and Hexactinellids from the Ozark Mountains of Northwestern Arkansas.” Journal of Paleontology, vol. 68, no. 4, 1994, pp. 734–746. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/1306142. Accessed 14 Nov. 2020. Stioderma sp. Fink 1960. Link Pennsylvanian Naco Formation Roberts Mesa, Gila County, Arizona 4 cm wide. Detail of above. 3/4 view Wewokella solida Girty 1911 Link Pennsylvanian Naco Formation Roberts Mesa, Gila County, Arizona 175 mm wide. Link Cross section of above. 145 mm tall. Detail of first Wewokella
  3. Alternate title: I found Pennsylvanian fossilized Sesame Wasa Crispbread; is it safe to eat? I have visited the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation east of Payson, Arizona several times this long hot summer and found some interesting sponges. My most interesting find was this 5 cm wide sponge that looked almost exactly like a Wasa Crispbread with sesame seeds on top. I was about to nickname it a Wasa sponge until I found out that it had a genus name: Stioderma. Pennsylvanian Desmoinian Stioderma occur in Texas. Link It is amazing how many fossils I have identified from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation by reading references from fossils found in Texas and Oklahoma: thanks. link to Collections I found a new 5 cm sponge that sort of looks like a horn coral, but it has spicules. The area contained the usual suspects such as this 165 mm long Wewokella solida Link. and this 50 mm Chaunactis olsoni that the Arizona Museum of Natural History expresses interest in and hopefully will get it.
  4. Hey everyone. I thought I'd share some of the things I found on my last fossil hunt. So.. Many.. Fossils! One might even say that there were a plethora of fossils. If I could, I would've taken them all with me, but sadly my backpack can only carry so many rocks. I was literally examining each rock I had, trying to decide which to carry back and which to leave behind and how many I could fit in my pants pockets before they started to fall down. Eventually I decided to just stop looking for fossils and hike back to the jeep. This lasted all of 3 seconds before I found another a beautiful byrozoan and was trying to figure out how to fit it in my pack. The byrozoan and the sponge below are my favorites since i don't see many of them and the brachipod in the matrix just looks cool. lol Its fascinating to look at these fossils and think about how Arizona used to be completely underwater long, long ago.
  5. I visited my favorite spot in the Early Kimmeridgian the other day and along with the usual ammonites, I came up with something quite interesting. It's a block out of the sponge reef facies with a Laevaptychus obliquus Aptychus as the center piece along with a Streblites tenuilobatus ammonite and a couple of smaller ones, a rhychonelloid brachiopod and even a little echinoid spine all attached to pieces of sponges. Everything is strongly calcified, so it's quite stable. I just had to abrade away the soft clay matrix and there they were.
  6. Unknown ordovician fossil

    I foud these two stones on a fossil hunting trip some weeks ago. The fossil on the below stone seems to be a gastropod (size about 3 cm), but is the other a sponge? Anyone have an idea? Both are from middle ordovicium, Oslo-field in Norway. Martin
  7. Boring Sponges from Big Brook

    From the album Cretaceous

    Cliona cretacica Boring Sponges Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattawan Group Big Brook Marlboro, N.J.
  8. 322BF84E-6FF9-4D8B-837C-AEE85DC5479A.jpeg

    From the album Lower Devonian Helderberg Group in Eastern NY

    Hindia sphaeroidalis from the new Scotland formation
  9. Hello, I have been finding all sorts of neat rocks and marine fossils in the desert outside of Yuma, Arizona where the Colorado river had once flowed into a large ocean. Are these fossilized coral or sponges? I would appreciate an ID on the specimens, or speculations as to what they are? Thank you.
  10. Central Missouri

    Im new to Missouri and live on the ordovician exposures of central Missouri. Anyone want to discuss useful information and educate me on my journey of fossil hunting here? Ive been finding a lot of gastropod and a few other things but im having a hard time learning to spot things other than shells.
  11. Naco Knockouts

    A few days ago I found a very productive fossil site in the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation in central Arizona. I went up to look at an interesting new track site in the Permian Coconino Sandstone NE of Payson that was found by a friend and is being studied by the prolific Spencer Lucas from New Mexico. Link The Naco Formation site that I just found, has the most diversity of sponges of any Naco site to date. It also has lots of large brachiopods. Photo 1 shows a 3.4881 × 10-18 light years (3.3 cm) long Composita subtilita brachiopod, the largest that I have seen. Photo 2: impression of exterior of a brachial brachiopod valve with spines now shown as holes (probably Exhinaria semipunctata). Shell about 5 cm wide. Photo 3: there were lots of Antiquatonia portlockiana brachiopods. This one is 5 cm across. Photo 4: impression of the exterior of a 3 cm brachiopod brachial valve. Note molds of spines below. Photo 5: this is the longest horn coral that I have ever seen from the Naco. It is 18 cm long. I am guessing that it is a Caninia sp. Photo 6: this is the largest “spiky ball sponge” that I ever have seen from the Naco. 1.7cm across. I only find them as singles in the rock or eroded out pieces that occur by the dozens in a small area. Literature hints that they might be sponges spicules. I am beginning to wonder if they are not an entire sponge or another creature altogether. I have yet to see a spicule that has crosspieces or ridges close to the center of the ball where the spikes attach. Photo 7: here is the pièce de résistance, a giant 10 cm Wewokella sponge that only a friend has found at another site and originally identified his as a coral. I said that his was a sponge. Wewokella have spicules with an average of 3 or 4 points unlike the Regispongia of similar appearance. Link Detail of above sponge. Note spicule shape. Photo 8: a 7 cm “dot sponge” of unknown affinity. They are somewhat common in the Naco. Photo 9: a small 1.5 cm disk shaped sponge with straight radiating spines. It might be a Belemnospongia. Photo 10: there are lots of flat chert masses that contain lots of straight sponges spines, probably from a single collapsed unidentified sponge.
  12. Fossils in Wren's Nest

    Hi. I visited Wren's Nest, Dudley, UK last summer. Just wonder if the fossils shown in the photos were corals or sponges. They were not uncommon but both were possibly damaged by diggers who attempted to excavate them. My apology the subject was a bit out of focus. Thanks. KS
  13. I've just added two sponges to my collection which I found recently in the Kimmeridgian Lochen Formation in the upper Danube Valley near Beuron. The first is the appropriately named Melonella radiata and the second is a Trochobolus texatus.
  14. Fossils on Wheels received another generous donation to our education programs this week. TFF member @Herb sent us a box of super cool invertebrates. He sent us a diversity of fossils from the Southern US that cover a wide range of eras. These fossils will be given to students in fossil starter kits and used in hands-on activities. Herb's donation is also awesome because this pushes me to learning a lot more about invertebrate fossils. One of the best parts of teaching kids about natural history through fossil exploration is that I get to learn a lot. Good teachers learn and challenge themselves so they can challenge their students. I do not have a lot of knowledge about these types of animals but I am so excited to start learning. Among the fossils we received were- Mississippian Corals and Brachiopods from Kentucky, Crinoid stems and Silurian sponges from Tennessee, Cretaceous Gastropods from Texas, and Eocene Bivalves from Alabama. Thank you Herb for a generous donation that will get put to good use
  15. Crinoids and corals?

    I found these fossils on Jebel Hafeet, Al Ain, UAE. The second rock looks like there is a criniod in it, but is more possibly a type of sponge. The first rock has quite a few things in it, including some type of coral. I would like to know what these really are.
  16. Sponges?

    These are all over our desert property in southeastern Cali. Various shapes, sizes, textures, and colors but I grouped some similarly textured ones for this photo. The ones pictured in the group are all lightweight with the texture of coral but we have many others with the same shapes & paisley-like designs (hard to see in photos) but made of smoother rock. I thought for a long time the pink thing in the last set of photos was someone's old spilled paint. It's about 12" wide. Any ideas?
  17. Has anyone visited Mazourka Canyon Road East of Independence? YouTube videos in the last year show a reasonable road and Donald Kenney [http://donaldkenney.x10.mx/SITES/CAMAZOURKA/CAMAZOURKA.HTM] lists a number of sites and the possible fossils. BFLADY
  18. From the album Lower Devonian

    Hindia sphaeroidalis (Demosponges) Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation Helderberg Group Interstate 88 road cut Schoharie, N.Y.
  19. MASS ID: sponges, corals, etc

    Most come from Illinois, and are as I figure corals and spines; question is what kind, and which? I apologize in advance, but instead of posting 20 threads for each one, I’m going to spam this one with all my sponge, coral, etc inquiries. So please be patient! (Thanks again guys for all your help! I only post the ones I cannot 100% identify via books and internet; unfortunately I gotta snarge ton more yet to come.) Here are items #1-3...
  20. Lack of snow cover and warmer than average temps allowed me to explore and collect sponges and corals from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation in central Arizona, north of Payson. Widespread chert of the Beta Member suggests that silicious sponges may have been common. Several have been identified but many more exist. I have seen and collected several undescribed species. Dilliard and Rigby have described several sponges including Chaunactis olsoni which I found in the area: The New Demosponges, Chaunactis olsoni and. Haplistion nacoense, and Associated Sponges from the. Pennsylvanian Naco Formation, Central Arizona. by DILLIARD and RIGBY http://geology.byu.edu/Home/sites/default/files/geo_stud_vol_46_dilliard_rigby.pdf EDIT: geo_stud_vol_46_dilliard_rigby.pdf Photo 1a. Detail of undesribed sponge. Marks are 1/16th inch. Any ideas? Photo 2. 3/4 quater view of sponge in photo 1a. Note red 1/3 to 2/3 inch thick pancake-like form of sponge. Photo 4. Top of another similiar sponge. Marks are 1/16th inch. Help me ID 2 corals and one sponge. Photo 3. Coral, Multithecopora?, which has been reported from the Naco many miles to the south. Photo 5. Probably Chaetetes, a side view. Photo 5a. Top of Chaetetes. Photo 6. Horn Coral, Zaphrentis? 1a.docx 2.docx 4.docx 3.docx 5.docx 5a.docx 6.docx
  21. Not settled yet

    I consider this important insofar as the various reasons for ,and processes involved in,marine invertebrate settlement are still being elucidated. uedanitrogenporiferasrep37546.pdf A must read for those with an interest in marine (paleo)-ecology Recommended for the deliciously informative fig.7 alone. 2,8 Mb,and it's from THAT journal
  22. Stromatoporoid Growth Forms?

    Lately if you have seen some of the topics I've started, these trips revolve around an Ordovician reef I came across by the Credit River in Mississauga, Ontario. One of the few things I discovered while exploring these spots is that there are plenty of Stromatocerium sponges which I red is a stromatoporoid. My question is, can anyone lead me to any papers about the growth forms of Ordovician stromatoporoids? I have found specimens of stromatoporoids and from the way I see it, some of the specimens I found of the same species have different growth forms. Some have those things they call monticules on the surface, and some don't exhibit them at all. Instead these specimens exhibit cracks and splits on the surface of the organism with irregular bumps and overgrowths. I'd like to know what causes this. Some of these sponges, from what I have collected, colonize some pieces of Prismostylus on the top.
  23. From the album Cretaceous

    Cliona cretacica (traces of boring sponge on Pycnodonte convexa (oyster shell) Upper Cretaceous Navesink Formation Poricy Brook Middletown, NJ.
  24. Cannot identify

    Hi all, I'm fairly new to this forum and fossil hunting in general. I need help identifying these, idk if they are coral, sponges, posibally bone or what. These were found in NE Kansas, in a rock deposit full of bryzoans, bivalves and other oceanic fossils. I do know the majority of these fossils here come from around the Cambrian through the Permian periods, however there have also been a few ice age fossils in the area, so that may help. Thanks a lot!
×