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Found 17 results

  1. Unknown marine fossils

    During a trip I purchased a container of small marine fossils. I could identify almost all of them except for a few. Age, location, etc. unknown. Does anyone know what they could be? P.S. feel free to ask for more pictures.
  2. Just reassembled, crinoid stem with a bit of character. Probably Poteriocrinus sp., or maybe Rhabdocrinus, 20cm long, 10-12mm diameter, in a high energy deposit full of crinoid, bryozoan and brachiopod débris. It's unusually well articulated for this bed which mostly contains smaller broken bits of stems, arms and plates. There's a probably pathological swelling towards the top, above the radices. Last photo shows it as collected - very fragile and the main stem had largely broken into calcite cleavage fragments. Prepping so far was just a matter of letting it dry, then gluing, poking off shale with a needle and scrubbing (wet again) with a toothbrush. I'm letting it dry thoroughly and will then consolidate the sides and base of the block with thin paraloid solution. I might then air abrade a bit. Brigantian, Co. Durham, UK.
  3. Crinoid fossil?

    Hey I was wondering if the stuff next to the crinoid stem is part of the plant and not just smaller stems. All I find are crinoid stems so I was wondering if this was part of the actual crinoid. Found In Cincinnati.
  4. Good afternoon everybody! During a fieldtrip in Silesia (Poland) last year I visited a rather large spoiltip looking for plant fossils. The spoils left behind by the mining company indicate they still use (or used) the old method to separate the coal from the surrounding debris, allowing the coal to be 'baked' (e. g. the presence of pyrite that turns into sulphuric acid -h2so4- under the influence of wind and rain, ...) something typical for the majority of spoiltips I visited in Western Europe. Unfortunately I have no detailed geological data on the age of the debris in the spoiltip but there is no doubt this is Silesian (upper Carboniferous) in age. I even tend to think this is Westphalian in age based on the fossils found, but let's keep it to upper Carboniferous to be sure. I found several species of Lepidodendron, some Eusphenopterids, both Stigmaria ficoides and S. stellata, etc... And this never-seen-before 'thing'. My initial thought was that this could be some sort stem/branch but, in my 20 years of collecting Paleozoic plants, I have never seen the repetative triangular pattern that covers the branch (or tube if you like). Perhaps this could be some sort of tracefossil? Since my ichnofossil-knowledge is extremely limited someone here can help me out? The height of the 'tubes' varies between 2 and 3mm. Have a nice day! Sven
  5. Your best guess at these please!

    we found these plant stem looking fossils at the beach in sydney australia. any idea as to their age and plant type would be really cool and the kids would love it! thanks Ben
  6. crinoid id

    Found these In a landscaping rock
  7. Raptorial Physeteroid Incisor (Chile)

    From the album Marine Mammals

    Scaldicetus sp? Found in Atacama Desert Region 3 of Chile Dated Messinian Stage of Miocene (≈7 mya) Measures 14 cm (5.5 inches)
  8. Crinoid Stem

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Crinoid Stem The first fossil I found at the park. It was sitting on the bottom of the swimming area in waist-deep, crystal-clear water! Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Pennsylvania
  9. Blastoid and crinoid mix up

    I while back I acquired a collection of fossils,minerals, and rocks. They were apparently found at an estate sale before being bought and sold online, hence the prices on the labels (not what I paid for them). It was rather large and confusing, but I managed to figure a lot of it out. One bag, however, has crinoid and blastoid stems and calyxs (calyxi? Calyxese?) and six labels, none attached to the specimens. I was wonder if y'all could help me sort them out, because I'm confused. A few of the labels are just "crinoid stems", is it possible to get a better ID on them? I can take more pictures if needed.
  10. Smashed stem?

    Found this is small item in a road cut west of Mineral Wells TX. The length is about that of a q-tip and difficult to get a good photo of. I'm guessing it is a smashed stem of some kind. Any help would be appreciated.
  11. Crinoid Stem Blemishes

    Crinoid stems with pits, welts, and what not.... Pit with swelling: Pit & swelling again. The remains of something can be seen inside: Multiple pits. This seems to be different than the first two: The encrusting bryozoans may be related to whatever caused the pits and welts:
  12. Possible Coral section?

    I found this rock in lanesboro Minnesota years ago in a riverbed. I believe a fossil identification book said it was a piece of coral stem? I can't remember very well, and I lost the book. I would love to know if anyone has any clue what it is. Thanks for reading! -the newbie
  13. Northeastern Ohio 10/31 - stem?

    I have found these before. Are they just a stem?
  14. Is This A Fossil Plant Stem?

    Hello. Please could you tell me what these things are found on the Northumberland coast, England? Toe of wellington boot in images to indicate scale. Third image is just slightly smaller than the second find. Please tell me everything you can... name of find, time it lived, whatever you can say would help me very much. I found several of these, but the three here are the best/biggest. Is it worth trying to get some form of protection for the area where these are to protect them from people walking on the rocks, or are they too common to be worthwhile saving in situ? I do want to preserve them though as an indicator of the prehistoric record of my area - they will get damaged/lost to the sea before long, so are they best left to their fate, or should they be removed to put in our planned local museum? Thank you.
  15. crinoid stems

    From the album 4/6/13

    found in my backyard in southern missouri
  16. crinoid stem

    From the album 4/6/13

    found in my backyard in southern missouri
  17. Carboniferous Creature Or Plant Fossil?

    Is this tiny conical shaped fossil evidence of a "carboniferous creature" or simly a stem fragment that happens to look like parts of a creature? This turned up when Nancy (the keen-eyed member of our family) was examining some finds we just made - she jokingly calls this a "fish tooth" although we both know it's not that. However, the lack of associated plant material suggests that this is either a very isolated stem with a white coating - or - possibly a tiny fossil from a carboniferous creature. We are actively looking for insects and other evidence that living things co-existed with the abundance of plant life in the fossilized swamps at the St. Clair shale pits however, we're very skeptical. We'll be interested in your opinions and inputs on what this might be, and why...thanks!
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