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Found 8 results

  1. Predation Marks on Hebertella?

    Hi guys so I have this Hebertella occidentalis specimen I collected yesterday from the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, which belongs to the Upper Member of the Georgian Bay Formation. Do these look like predation marks? There are also what appears to some crystallized grains inside these marks and I think they could be some sort of calcite. Sorry for the noisy grain of the image, but I hope this will help.
  2. Yesterday the weather in my area hit above the 20 degrees Celsius so I dared myself to go to Streetsville in Mississauga to visit a fossil site I have not been to in 2 years. I now live in Hamilton, Ontario so travelling to Streetsville was intimidating for me using public transit from Hamilton to Streetsville. I have not been to Streetsville by the Credit River ever since I moved from Etobicoke to Hamilton, Ontario and I miss collecting in this vicinity. But I made it. :)) I took pics of exposure sites as these sites are mentioned in one of the literatures describing the Georgian Bay formation. This site exposes the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member.
  3. Hello guys. I’ve got 2 Late Ordovician reef fossils from Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada that I’d like to trade away to make room now that the fossil hunting season is coming back soon. I am trading away the specimens below. These are very nice specimens and comes from an exposure out of access to the ordinary public. Both belong to the Upper Member of the Georgian Bay Formation. Favistina calicina: Stromatocerium huronense:
  4. Stromatocerium huronense

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Stromatocerium huronense (Billings, 1865) Late Ordovician stromatoporoid sponge. Found along the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Collected as a loose specimen, most likely coming from the Stromatocerium reef of the exposure this came from. Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. There is a tiny Favistella alveolata coral colony growing on the edge of the specimen, perhaps this was a commensalistic relationship? Specimen is 12 cm long. However this species in the exposure where it came from can grow beyond a foot in diameter as mounds.
  5. Favistella alveolata

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826) Found as a loose specimen at an exposure at the Credit River on Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Late Ordovician, Georgian Bay formation. A rugose colonial coral. Coral approximately 10 cm excluding extra matrix.
  6. Homotrypa sp. (streetsvillensis?)

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Homotrypa sp. (streetsvillensis?, Dyer, 1925) Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. Plate of unidentifiable bryozoa. Found as a loose specimen on an exposure on the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Approximately 12 cm long and 10 cm wide. Comes from the Homotrypa streetsvillensis zone layer of fossiliferous limestone full of bryozoans. The layer is around 18 inches to 2 ft thick, as described by W.S. Dyer in his "Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Credit River" on pg. 50.
  7. Side Views of the Prismostylus sp. Specimen

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Side view of the Prismostylus sp. specimen. Credit River near the Streetsville area, Mississauga, Ontario. Georgian Bay Formation, Streetsville Member. Late Ordovician.
  8. Yesterday on April 24 I decided to go and visit a place in Mississauga, Ontario called Streetsville which used to be a township of its own before being joined to Mississauga to form the City of Mississauga. I took public transportation to get there and it took me about 1.5 hrs to get there. I went to the Credit River near Streetsville and explored the banks. I had trouble finding a natural exposure as all I was finding were banks with worn out rocks and silt. The river's bottom does not have the same clarity as the Humber River in Etobicoke as I could not see the shale bottom of river. All I was seeing at the Credit's bottom were worn out rocks, algae and silt. The river was also wider than the Humber and in some places it seemed deeper as well which made me think twice about crossing to reach this natural exposure I found. The banks mostly had worn rocks but some nice material can be found. I was surprised at the fauna I found. The rocks are still part of the Georgian Bay Formation but the fossils are completely alien to my eyes. They were nothing that I usually encounter at the Humber River or at Mimico Creek. The place was littered with small coral bits and there lots of what appeared to be Tetradium bits. There also many brachiopod hash plates around. This hash plate here has a piece of coral at the bottom along with many brachiopod bits. There were some things familiar to me like that hash plate of bryozoans and I only found one cephalopod fragment. Where I usually hunt cephalopods are very common to find in Mimico Creek and at the Humber River. There were also these odd trace fossils lying around.
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