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Found 56 results

  1. Tyrannosaurid lips

    What do people think about tyrannosaurid lips?
  2. Hi everyone , i am new to this site and unsure how to go around yet . But the main reasons of my membership , i have been told by a nice person in Seattle to join your group . What i'm about to write is hard to believe , i don't know why such event is happening in my life . Long story short , North Lancaster Ontario , i as a hobby on my land with streams and river was looking for gold , there was lots by crushing rocks that i judged mineral decay of iron , pyrite and gold . The trouble is that i wasn't crushing stones but bones of dinosaurs that i came to realize one step at the time . Looking around , every rocks on the ground , streams and all of them were fossils where i finally seen the fossils on parts of dino's . I turned the table , upset with my stupid self crushing precious remains for a while . I then started to question the whole scene , well after another venture pushed by my curiosity i have found what appeared to be a part of a T-Rex , then i looked across the bridge i made to stack of rocks , piles of complete dinosaurs left by a farmer back long ago i presume . So still doubtful of every new information , i started following the shape of the T-Rex with a brush and a photo . It was one , one next to it , countless in back and around barn . they are not dug out yet . I left the ones that were rocks which are real nice to carry on my one dino . I seen many obvious spots around the acreages , i know , i am only 5 or 6 ft above the old Champlain sea , i also realized that my basement floor is the sea bed guess with what in , T=rex . I thought it was going a bit to far keep questioning myself . The bad parts of Paleontologists i'll leave for later , that makes my blood boil . broil .,,, I have now in a month of my new quest , 3 T-rex to undertake ??? put the puzzle across the creek together and i am still by myself after trying all avenues possible . my blood again lol .. Can someone help me thanks lots , Philippe
  3. I recently came across the young earth theory (the theory that earth is 10.000 years old and dinosaurs coexisted with humans and traveled with Noah and his ark) and of course i thought it was unfeasible but one common argument they keep having is why are we finding soft tissues, proteins and other biochemicals in fossils like triceratops, t-rex and other dinosaur bones of course that doesn't mean DNA BUT they shouldn't have been preserved because such biochemicals don't get preserved after so much time. Another one is that some old fossils are still close to the surface when they should be buried really deep. So what are your thoughts on these arguments, in my opinion this theory is ridiculous but i'd love to learn the answers. Thanks (PS sorry for asking that many questions these days its just that im new to the forum and have lots of questions)
  4. Theropod data for a computer science study.

    Hello I am working on my PhD in computer science and am working on collecting data for my thesis. I have been looking for a lot of data on theropod measurements like; teeth size, body mass, femur and tibia, length width, and other measurements (the more the better). I would like to collect samples from a few theropods like the T-Rex, Raptors, ect... and to have multiple skeleton for each. I need to have their measurement for my data points. I know that there are some journals that give detailed measurement for each fossil they find but I do not know how to search for them as each search yields vary results. Is there a certain key word that I should use to get the measurements for each fossil? I have been here https://paleobiodb.org/#/ but it does not look like the information that I need. Any help on this will be appreciated.
  5. Fossils on Wheels can officially say we are an elementary assembly program We will be doing two presentations for all of the students at Nord Country Day School. it is a small charter in the middle of farm country here. I personally love the single class presentations because they allow you to interact with the students in a more in-depth manner. The assembly style programs are our best way to travel to schools outside of city though. We can educate an entire school versus 30-35 students at a time. This is pilot program but it is very important to our future to develop a large scale traveling fossil program. Things are moving very quickly for us and we are starting to reach large numbers of students. A big leap forward for us and a chance to bring real fossils to an entire school. This will also be the debut for our Diplodocus fossil which is our largest piece. I am really excited to bring Dippy to a presentation.
  6. It is 47 cm in length and has a little restoration. It is from the Hell Creek formation in Montana.
  7. I recently got this tooth confirmed as T-rex, and I had another question about the same tooth. I’ve wondered about this for probably as long as I’ve had it. The tooth is around 7/8 of an inch long, missing a chunk out of the bottom right. Regardless of the missing chunk, how complete do you think it is length wise? Is it most of the total length of the tooth if it was a perfect fossil?
  8. T-rex Teeth Verification

    For context, I have received these photos from the shop that I have done business with previously. I want to ensure that these are rex teeth and not another genus. I acknowledge that these pictures do not show the base of the teeth which seems to be the tell tale differentiation, in addition to measurements of scale and so on. Therefore, I just would like to see the opinions of those on the forum with the pictures provided, I wish I was able to take more appropriate photos of the specimens. Tooth #1 strikes me as a likely rex candidate simply because of the robustness, #2 I'm not so sure. Not an expert on theropod teeth by any means. Thank you all! (The 98 million year old age is a typo, they have a more expensive tooth with the appropriate age of 68 million years)
  9. Back in November of last year, my son and I decided to start our own education non-profit. We wanted to combine his artwork, my teaching skills, and real fossils to create a museum on wheels that takes fun field trips to the classrooms. We had shark teeth and marine mammal fossils so we started building education programs around those. I am very satisfied where those two programs are at though I would love to expand the number of shark species we can present but that is a story for a different day. We knew we would need to get a dinosaur program going at some point but I know nothing about dinosaur fossils so I did not want to start collecting yet. My plan was to wait until late spring or early summer to start building our collection. A friend gave us two hadrosaur teeth and a Hypselosaurus egg shell piece in December so our program got started earlier than planned. As we do with every decision, my son and I talked about picking up a few bargain dinosaur fossils while we tightened up the other programs which are debuting in March. One of the first things I did was join TFF. I was very intimidated by dinosaur fossils and I hoped this place would help me educate myself. I have been a quiet observer so far and have not engaged very much with the dinosaur experts here. I have read a lot of posts and this has been so incredibly helpful. Utilizing the expertise of the members here has also saved me money and stopped me from making one unwise purchase. I have only picked up a few dinosaur items up to this point but without being on this site, I doubt I would have made any attempt at starting this particular collection so soon. I am very grateful for the forum and its members because a lot of people really want to help. I quickly learned that our presentation will be centered on the Hell Creek fauna and we can augment it with some African dinosaurs. After a bit of window shopping, it became apparent right away that Jurassic period dinosaurs were simply too expensive for us. There is no way we will be able to purchase any and trades are unlikely as we just do not have much material that would have much trade value. I can live with this though. If we focus on the T-rex/Ceratopsian fauna of Hell Creek we are giving kids species they know plus introducing them to new species which I am totally cool with. We also decided we could talk Triassic dinosaurs with kids using Bull Canyon fossils. Now I am an avid reader here so I am aware that there is some debate about the species that are found in Bull Canyon and how things are labeled by dealers but I did pick some up because we want to teach kids about the evolution of dinosaurs and to give them a few species that have never heard of. I can not be sure if the teeth I have are Coelophysis teeth but we are still going to present them as such to the students because it is an opportunity to get to early dinosaurs. Same goes for a "prosauropod" tooth we purchased. We are not going to sell the fossils so the correct ID is less important to us than being able to at least have a representation of early dinosaurs for the kiddos. Our early efforts were given a huge boost when a member here helped broker a transaction between another member which resulted in us having a very nice partial T-rex and a Nano. This was huge for us. We got the centerpiece species and it was super affordable. I am still in a bit of shock to be honest and incredibly grateful. We also picked up some inexpensive Hell Creek Triceratops teeth. I found a nice Saurornitholestes from Judith River which gives us a "raptor" fossil for the kids. I got an inexpensive Moroccan sauropod tooth which gives us a "long neck" that we can use. It is really not a bad start in my eyes. We picked some species that we really wanted to include. We also have begun to find some teeth that kids can handle in the form of partial or shed Ceratopsian teeth and inexpensive Spinosaurus teeth from Morocco. I only made one questionable decision. I did not use TFF and ended up misidentifying a tooth. This led us to having two Richardoesstesia gilmorei teeth. We really did not need two fossils from this species but it was a learning experience. I learned that I need keep studying, learning and using the forum. Had I put it here first, instead of testing my own skills, I would not have picked it up . I would have filled another need in the program. Lesson learned and the upside is that I do have a dinosaur fossil I can possibly trade. It is not much for trade I am sure, but maybe I can use it to get a fossil that fills a hole in the program. The most important thing I have learned so far is that I really enjoy collecting dinosaur fossils. I am hooked. I was never a dinosaur kid myself. I preferred sharks and whales but I am really captivated by dinosaurs now. I have been cramming my brain with scientific information about dinosaurs and my son is really enjoying getting a start on his dino artwork. We have a long way to go before we are ready to unleash our budding dino education program. I have a long way to go with my own knowledge too. I do know it will be a lot of fun to learn and I am looking forward to getting more interactive with the dinosaur collectors here. We have settled on the next round of dinosaurs to add (Acheroraptor, Ankylosaur, Pachycephalosaurus, a Troodontid, plus more Ceratopsian material) and they seem attainable so I am excited to get to work on those in the near future. I also learned there are species from the Hell Creek formation that are awesome but we will never have due to price or rarity lol Dakotaraptor is #1 on that list but the avian dinosaurs are not far behind. All things considered, I am super happy with our tiny dinosaur collection and I am really enjoying the hunt for more !!
  10. T-Rex Sculpture

    Here is a full size skull my friend and I made. It is currently being displayed at the Natural History Society of Maryland. The lower jaw moves and can be displayed open or closed.
  11. My son and I recently started an education non-profit using fossils. Since the little kids love dinosaurs, we decided to include them in our programs. I do not know much about Dinosaur fossils but I am trying learning on the fly. There is no way we can pick up a full tooth or large bone from a T-Rex. our purchasing power is limited. I did find a dealer that has several partial teeth or tooth shards listed as T-Rex. They are affordable for us and did come from Hell Creek. I am apprehensive about buying any of them though because I do not want to drop any money on something called a T-Rex unless I can be fairly certain that is what it is. I do not possess enough knowledge to ID a partial tooth nor do I know if you even can correctly identify a tooth shard. I will put to this those here with far more knowledge than I have.... Can you ID a tooth shard as T-Rex and if that is possible, what would you look for ? Thank you in advance for any help that I can get
  12. Hell Creek Tyrannosaur tooth tip , nano ? rex?

    Hi! I have a tooth tip from hell creek formation but I dont know if its nano or rex, the serration count fits within the t-rex range with 2 serrations/mm , but I do think its quite slender for a rex tooth. What do you think? I tried my best to get a photo of the serrations but it wasn't very easy. The tooth tip is just 16 mm.
  13. T-Rex tooth or not? And aubleysodon?

    Hi, I am new to the forum. I just got back from a dig with Paleoadventures. Had a great time! With their digs, you are allowed to keep common fossils (triceratops teeth, bone fragments), but anything commercial (t-rex teeth) must be bought for an additional fee and anything scientifically significant cannot be purchased. I found what was identified to me by the company as a T-Rex tooth. The attached field pics are all that I have at the moment (I have a couple more but it wouldn't let me upload more). I was told that it may cost $1500 to buy. It is being prepped and I will be contacted hopefully by the end of the month following full appraisal. I found this tooth myself in the "tooth draw" site, hell creek formation, South Dakota. I know it is genuine. My question is, how do I know for sure that it is a T-Rex tooth? I don't want to pay a premium price for something that might cost less if it were Albertasaurus or Nanotyrannasaurus or some other tyrannasaurid. What other tyrannasaurids can be found in the hell creek formation that it could be mistaken for? Are there any specific questions or information I should request before purchase? It measured approximately 2 inches long and appears to have serrations. The owner, Walter Stein, has a good resume and seems trustworthy, but I just want to make sure. I've Googled everything I can google and I'm driving myself nuts! Another curiosity....I also found what was explained to me to be a baby T-Rex tooth, but what was ultimately labelled as an "Aubleysodon" tooth. I didn't have the option to buy it because it was considered scientifically significant. Seems there is some debate regarding T-Rex, aubleysodon, and nanotyrannasaurus, regarding whether or not they are separate or the same. I also have a picture of it but couldn't upload. Any input?
  14. Is this really T-Rex Premax tooth? Size is slightly less than 2 inches (T-Rex Premax tooth rarely exceed 2.5 inches). Can it be some other Dinosaur teeth such as Nanotyrannus? Thank you.
  15. Hi! I'm new to the World of Fossils and had a question about this item. I found it online. It is being sold by Smoky Mountain Relic Room Rendezvous. It is described as a T-rex dinosaur bone fragment. I was wondering if anyone on this forum knows if this seems legitimate, because the price was low and I had thought that T-Rex fossils are usually more expensive. Any responses are appreciated!
  16. Its Toothy Tuesday Time Tooth of the pliosaurid Liopleurodon from the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Oxford Clay of the Peterborough area in England, courtesy of Sven Sachs WOW now thats big Skull of the giant ichthyosaur Temnodontosaurus. Lower Jurassic of Bielefeld. Collection of the Natural History Museum Bielefeld, Germany. Also by S. Sachs More from Sven ..Skull of the amiid fish Calamopleurus from the Lower Cretaceous of Brazil. On display at the Geomatikum, University of Hamburg (Germany) Give it a few seconds for 3D image to activate From the Witmer Lab the a 3D image of the Dentary of the Nanotyrannus "Jane" https://t.co/uuM7tmCRHZ Also from the Witmer Lab dentary of Majungasaurus from Madagascar https://t.co/ElIGOIGUdI Tyrannosaur tooth climbing out of its root bound tomb, courtesy of Eric Lund Tyrannosaurus premaxillary (above) and dentary (below) tooth from the same individual. Courtesy of David Honex Walruses once lived along the coast of New Jersey! Here is the palate (roof of the mouth) of a large walrus, Odobenus rosmarus, that was dredged up off of Long Branch, NJ. You can see the sockets where the tusks once were and 3 small teeth on each side. Courtesy of NJ State Museum Tooth of a large (~4 m) dromaeosaurid from North Carolina, courtesy of Chase Brownstein. Setting up one of Hesperornis dentaries for molding. Courtesy of Carrie Herbel Also from Carrie, a skull of the Cretaceous toothed bird Hesperornis. In the lab scanning a tyrannosaurid maxilla from the Texas Mem Museum Juvenile T rex teeth from Baby Bob, hmmm definitely not Nanotyrannus Fossils are great, but it’s kind of a bummer there aren’t walking whales like Pakicetus, courtesy of Brian Switek Daspletosaurus dentary in the collections NHM London from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, collected by WE Cutler, courtesy of NHMdinoLab Also from the dinolab the Middle Jurassic theropod Duriavenator One more For all you T. rex groupies out there here’s some of the dentary teeth from the first skeleton of this species ever found now at NHM London , collected by Barnum Brown in 1900, from Wyoming, USA A Daspletosaurus from tge Two Medicine Fm of Montana, courtesy of Jack Horner
  17. Tyrannosaurus?

    Ok, here's 2 pieces. I think it's clear which are which, but just to be clear, of these first 4 pics, the 2nd picture for some weird reason, is of the 2nd bone, and the other 3 are of the 1st, and the rest of its pics will have to follow in additional posts. Of course I'm still no expert, but as some of you will know Ive been doing QUITE a bit of research on trex bones recently, and I have to say that from what I can see, to ME, who again, is no expert, they look like they fit, and I haven't seen anything that discounts that. Both from hell creek. <<As always, I very much want to hear what everyone has to say about it.....ESPECIALLY if u agree, but even if you don't too, of course:) A lot of what Iv learned recently and been pointed in the right directions to learn, is from you guys giving me your thoughts and ideas! If I notice something to debate, or devils advocate in people's ideas, its cause I'm taking it seriously. I worry I might sometimes come off as being stubborn and just disregarding things of people who's opinion is just not what I am wanting to hear.
  18. Hi all, I am new to fossil collecting and I am looking to acquire either a T-Rex or Carcharodontosaurus. I found this online. The seller claims that there are no repair/restoration on Carcharodontosaurus teeth and also offers money back guarantee. T-Rex tooth has few small hydrartion cracks that were stabilized as per the seller. I am debating whether to buy 2.5 inch T-rex tooth vs 6 inch Carcharodontosaurus tooth. The price is pretty much the same. I am attaching photos of both Carcharodontosaurus (Photos 1 to 4) and T-rex (photos 5-9) My question is which one would you choose for long term investment. Also, which one would you choose based on rarity and condition? Is a 6 inch Carch tooth rare?. I appreciate your opinions.
  19. Nanotyrannus or t-rex?

    Hi again, Just picked up a small collection of teeth for for a wonderful price. Included was this tooth, the owner wasn’t sure whether it was a nano or t-rex. Top profile shape is very hard to work out on this tooth. Tooth is around 2 cm in length. No ideas on location/state so super helpful that was! Any ideas?
  20. Here its my first large Tyrannosaurus tooth form Hell Creek Formation and i really enjoy its much having my favourite dinosaur its has have nice patterns on its dark brown and light brown its measure 3 1/8 inches and i was told its was a ingested tooth but let me know whether you think its form one. Enjoy
  21. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jun/20/tongue-tied-t-rex-couldnt-stick-out-its-tongue https://www.cnet.com/news/t-rex-most-dinosaurs-couldnt-stick-out-their-tongues/
  22. Interested in seeing what it takes to put a replica T-rex of Stan together for a museum in Japan. Pete Larsen president of the Black Hills Institute walks us through a build through his Twitter feed. The mount starts in the hips, ilium and sacrum To mount the legs and pelvis (one operation) it takes 4 holders for the legs, 2 holders for the body and tail pipes, 1 welder and a spotter to see that it is anatomically sound Vertebrae added to the tail and getting longer. And longer... And longer Pubes, ischia and fibulae to the mount Gastralia are ready to mount on the skeleton Mounting the dorsal and cervical vertebrae, creating a fitting between cervical 9 and 10, so that the neck is a separate section. Ribs mounted Dorsal ribs 1 and 4 need steel inorder to support the pectoral girdle. Scapula-coracoids also need steel to connect to the ribs and support the arms. Finished mounting the chevrons Scapula-coracoids and the four supporting ribs mounted Those four ribs and the scalp-coracoids need implanted steel and fittings to support themselves and the arms, while still being removable for their shipment Arms added, installed the furcula Adjusted the Ribs Mounted the Crevical ribs Left Foot
  23. Baby Tyrannosaur fossil

    http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/03/29/stunning-dinosaur-discovery-experts-may-have-unearthed-baby-tyrannosaur-fossil-in-montana.html
  24. Here is tyrannosauridae tooth from hell creek formation. It almost 3cm long, and well condition except tip and one side. I'm looking for mammalian fossils or meg, or... other fossils what i don't have. Every good fossils are welcome. I'll add more pics.
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