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Found 44 results

  1. T-Rex tooth or not? And aubleysodon?

    Hi, I am new to the forum. I just got back from a dig with Paleoadventures. Had a great time! With their digs, you are allowed to keep common fossils (triceratops teeth, bone fragments), but anything commercial (t-rex teeth) must be bought for an additional fee and anything scientifically significant cannot be purchased. I found what was identified to me by the company as a T-Rex tooth. The attached field pics are all that I have at the moment (I have a couple more but it wouldn't let me upload more). I was told that it may cost $1500 to buy. It is being prepped and I will be contacted hopefully by the end of the month following full appraisal. I found this tooth myself in the "tooth draw" site, hell creek formation, South Dakota. I know it is genuine. My question is, how do I know for sure that it is a T-Rex tooth? I don't want to pay a premium price for something that might cost less if it were Albertasaurus or Nanotyrannasaurus or some other tyrannasaurid. What other tyrannasaurids can be found in the hell creek formation that it could be mistaken for? Are there any specific questions or information I should request before purchase? It measured approximately 2 inches long and appears to have serrations. The owner, Walter Stein, has a good resume and seems trustworthy, but I just want to make sure. I've Googled everything I can google and I'm driving myself nuts! Another curiosity....I also found what was explained to me to be a baby T-Rex tooth, but what was ultimately labelled as an "Aubleysodon" tooth. I didn't have the option to buy it because it was considered scientifically significant. Seems there is some debate regarding T-Rex, aubleysodon, and nanotyrannasaurus, regarding whether or not they are separate or the same. I also have a picture of it but couldn't upload. Any input?
  2. Is this really T-Rex Premax tooth? Size is slightly less than 2 inches (T-Rex Premax tooth rarely exceed 2.5 inches). Can it be some other Dinosaur teeth such as Nanotyrannus? Thank you.
  3. Hi! I'm new to the World of Fossils and had a question about this item. I found it online. It is being sold by Smoky Mountain Relic Room Rendezvous. It is described as a T-rex dinosaur bone fragment. I was wondering if anyone on this forum knows if this seems legitimate, because the price was low and I had thought that T-Rex fossils are usually more expensive. Any responses are appreciated!
  4. Its Toothy Tuesday Time Tooth of the pliosaurid Liopleurodon from the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) Oxford Clay of the Peterborough area in England, courtesy of Sven Sachs WOW now thats big Skull of the giant ichthyosaur Temnodontosaurus. Lower Jurassic of Bielefeld. Collection of the Natural History Museum Bielefeld, Germany. Also by S. Sachs More from Sven ..Skull of the amiid fish Calamopleurus from the Lower Cretaceous of Brazil. On display at the Geomatikum, University of Hamburg (Germany) Give it a few seconds for 3D image to activate From the Witmer Lab the a 3D image of the Dentary of the Nanotyrannus "Jane" https://t.co/uuM7tmCRHZ Also from the Witmer Lab dentary of Majungasaurus from Madagascar https://t.co/ElIGOIGUdI Tyrannosaur tooth climbing out of its root bound tomb, courtesy of Eric Lund Tyrannosaurus premaxillary (above) and dentary (below) tooth from the same individual. Courtesy of David Honex Walruses once lived along the coast of New Jersey! Here is the palate (roof of the mouth) of a large walrus, Odobenus rosmarus, that was dredged up off of Long Branch, NJ. You can see the sockets where the tusks once were and 3 small teeth on each side. Courtesy of NJ State Museum Tooth of a large (~4 m) dromaeosaurid from North Carolina, courtesy of Chase Brownstein. Setting up one of Hesperornis dentaries for molding. Courtesy of Carrie Herbel Also from Carrie, a skull of the Cretaceous toothed bird Hesperornis. In the lab scanning a tyrannosaurid maxilla from the Texas Mem Museum Juvenile T rex teeth from Baby Bob, hmmm definitely not Nanotyrannus Fossils are great, but it’s kind of a bummer there aren’t walking whales like Pakicetus, courtesy of Brian Switek Daspletosaurus dentary in the collections NHM London from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, collected by WE Cutler, courtesy of NHMdinoLab Also from the dinolab the Middle Jurassic theropod Duriavenator One more For all you T. rex groupies out there here’s some of the dentary teeth from the first skeleton of this species ever found now at NHM London , collected by Barnum Brown in 1900, from Wyoming, USA A Daspletosaurus from tge Two Medicine Fm of Montana, courtesy of Jack Horner
  5. Tyrannosaurus?

    Ok, here's 2 pieces. I think it's clear which are which, but just to be clear, of these first 4 pics, the 2nd picture for some weird reason, is of the 2nd bone, and the other 3 are of the 1st, and the rest of its pics will have to follow in additional posts. Of course I'm still no expert, but as some of you will know Ive been doing QUITE a bit of research on trex bones recently, and I have to say that from what I can see, to ME, who again, is no expert, they look like they fit, and I haven't seen anything that discounts that. Both from hell creek. <<As always, I very much want to hear what everyone has to say about it.....ESPECIALLY if u agree, but even if you don't too, of course:) A lot of what Iv learned recently and been pointed in the right directions to learn, is from you guys giving me your thoughts and ideas! If I notice something to debate, or devils advocate in people's ideas, its cause I'm taking it seriously. I worry I might sometimes come off as being stubborn and just disregarding things of people who's opinion is just not what I am wanting to hear.
  6. Hi all, I am new to fossil collecting and I am looking to acquire either a T-Rex or Carcharodontosaurus. I found this online. The seller claims that there are no repair/restoration on Carcharodontosaurus teeth and also offers money back guarantee. T-Rex tooth has few small hydrartion cracks that were stabilized as per the seller. I am debating whether to buy 2.5 inch T-rex tooth vs 6 inch Carcharodontosaurus tooth. The price is pretty much the same. I am attaching photos of both Carcharodontosaurus (Photos 1 to 4) and T-rex (photos 5-9) My question is which one would you choose for long term investment. Also, which one would you choose based on rarity and condition? Is a 6 inch Carch tooth rare?. I appreciate your opinions.
  7. Nanotyrannus or t-rex?

    Hi again, Just picked up a small collection of teeth for for a wonderful price. Included was this tooth, the owner wasn’t sure whether it was a nano or t-rex. Top profile shape is very hard to work out on this tooth. Tooth is around 2 cm in length. No ideas on location/state so super helpful that was! Any ideas?
  8. Here its my first large Tyrannosaurus tooth form Hell Creek Formation and i really enjoy its much having my favourite dinosaur its has have nice patterns on its dark brown and light brown its measure 3 1/8 inches and i was told its was a ingested tooth but let me know whether you think its form one. Enjoy
  9. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jun/20/tongue-tied-t-rex-couldnt-stick-out-its-tongue https://www.cnet.com/news/t-rex-most-dinosaurs-couldnt-stick-out-their-tongues/
  10. Interested in seeing what it takes to put a replica T-rex of Stan together for a museum in Japan. Pete Larsen president of the Black Hills Institute walks us through a build through his Twitter feed. The mount starts in the hips, ilium and sacrum To mount the legs and pelvis (one operation) it takes 4 holders for the legs, 2 holders for the body and tail pipes, 1 welder and a spotter to see that it is anatomically sound Vertebrae added to the tail and getting longer. And longer... And longer Pubes, ischia and fibulae to the mount Gastralia are ready to mount on the skeleton Mounting the dorsal and cervical vertebrae, creating a fitting between cervical 9 and 10, so that the neck is a separate section. Ribs mounted Dorsal ribs 1 and 4 need steel inorder to support the pectoral girdle. Scapula-coracoids also need steel to connect to the ribs and support the arms. Finished mounting the chevrons Scapula-coracoids and the four supporting ribs mounted Those four ribs and the scalp-coracoids need implanted steel and fittings to support themselves and the arms, while still being removable for their shipment Arms added, installed the furcula Adjusted the Ribs Mounted the Crevical ribs Left Foot
  11. Baby Tyrannosaur fossil

    http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/03/29/stunning-dinosaur-discovery-experts-may-have-unearthed-baby-tyrannosaur-fossil-in-montana.html
  12. Here is tyrannosauridae tooth from hell creek formation. It almost 3cm long, and well condition except tip and one side. I'm looking for mammalian fossils or meg, or... other fossils what i don't have. Every good fossils are welcome. I'll add more pics.
  13. It seems that the notorious T-rex was not only inaudible (there was already an article about it), but it also looked a little .... weird http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5218921/T-rex-tufty-hair-orange-eyebrows.html
  14. T-rex Skull Untombed

    The discovery of the Tyrannosaurus rex led by a team from the Burke Museum made news last year. I've attached some photos of the preparation of the skull provide by the Burke Museum to show their progress with this dinosaur They have named this animal "Tufts-Love Rex" after Jason Love and Luke Tufts, the two volunteers who discovered it. Lower Jaw is exposed from its tomb. What a beautiful set of chompers The Skull is next. Maxilla More will follow as work continues..... @Pagurus
  15. Whether the T-Rex sounded like in the Jurassic Park movie or like the famous Jaws music - it's certainly not something I would like to hear anywhere near http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5163799/Roar-T-Rex-heard-time-66-million-years.html
  16. 3 hell creek theropod teeth

    I found these three teeth on a certain auction site (all 5/8" long) listed as raptor teeth (probably just based on size), but clearly the first two are not. They must be either Nanotyrannus or T. rex. The cross section of the first is very rectangular like Nanotyrannus, but also very robust/"fat". I'm leaning toward Nano on this one. The second seems more oval shaped so I'm leaning a little toward T. rex on this one. I'm not really sure on either though. As for the third one, my gut says Nanotyrannus. The anterior and posterior serrations are definitely too similar for Acheroraptor (I have one, very different), but could it possibly be Dakotaraptor? Any help here is appreciated. I'm really not very interested in Nanotyrannus teeth right now but I am very interested in small mislabeled T. rex or Dakotaraptor teeth. tooth #1: tooth #2: tooth #3:
  17. T-rex teeth?

    Hi guys! I recently acquired two large theropod teeth from a reputable mate who is a geologist in the US. He had acquired a 30yo collection from a Harvard professor and these teeth were labeled as T-rex from Wyoming. I have showed pics of them to mates who believe they are Carcharodontosaurus. I trust my mate, but I do believe it's possible the specimens were mislabeled. My mate says the chance of that is very slim however. Is there any way to tell if they are Carcharodontosaurus or T-rex?
  18. Hi Everyone, I'm trying to determine if this tooth does indeed come from a Tyrannosaurus Rex. It's a small tooth which makes a positive ID a little tough, but I'm leaning towards this being a Rex tooth. Can anyone confirm as to whether this is a genuine Rex tooth, or something else such as a Nanotyrannus tooth, or Tyrannosaurid indet? When I asked for photos of the base of the tooth the seller mentioned that he had read @Troodon's post about T-Rex VS Nano teeth too . The base does seem more rounded versus rectangular. Information: Size: 1.1 inches long Formation: Hell Creek Location: Garfield County, Montana (Private Land)
  19. Is this supposedly a T-Rex tooth from Hell Creek Formation ? i dont see any serrations could be worn out the size is 3 3/4 inch and any restorations or repair to it ?
  20. Blaine seems to have a knack for finding Rex teeth. He has found quite a few. Mainly smaller teeth or just partials. He had found a 4" rex tooth last year. Just a couple of weeks ago he had found a beautiful 6"! It is broken but he has all the pieces so it can be put back together.(I am glad I do not have to put it back together!) The photo makes the tooth look worse than it really is. When the tooth is finished it will make a lovey addition to our collection.
  21. Hi all! I'm a writer and I'm working on a short story about Paleontology. I write about things that catch my interest and I think I saw on a cereal box somewhere there where only 3 (mostly complete) Rex skeletons. Only 3! My question is how much do we usually find when it comes to Rex's at dig sites? Is it a bone here and there, or like a quarter or so of the animal. I find it very weird that we only have 3 after all these years. Anyway, thought I'd ask some experts rather than make things up, haha Thanks! -Isaac
  22. Scale with my hand

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  23. Top view

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  24. Front view

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
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