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Found 4 results

  1. As there are some polished fossil-rock specimens from this formation in the Christmas auction, I would like to present some background info with (mostly) some field photographs, so I have put this in “Fossil Hunting Trips”. The Palaeozoic of Graz is a thrust sheet within the Eastern Alps, composed of Silurian to Pennsylvanian sediments. It consists of three separate nappes, the most fossiliferous formation is the Plabutsch-formation within the Rannach nappe. This Devonian formation is of Eifelian age (ca. 395 Ma), about 100 m thick and mostly made up of a very dark, gray-blueish to black, fine-grained, thickly bedded limestone. Superficially, it weathers to a medium to light grey color. Geological map of Styria with the Palaeozoic of Graz situated north of Graz. Stratigraphic column of the Rannach nappe of the Palaeozoic of Graz, Plabutsch-formation is Nr. 4. From Hubmann & Gross, 2015. Thicknesses of formations are not to scale! The Plabutsch-formation crops out at various places to the west and north of Graz and more than 100 fossil sites are known within this formation. The most abundant fossils are corals, brachiopods, stromatoporids and crinoid fragments. Other fossils like gastropods, bivalves or trilo-bits are very rare. In a paper from 1975, about 50 coral species are listed, but less than 10 are abundant: Tabulata: Favosites styriacus Penecke, 1894 Pachycanalicula barrandei (Penecke, 1887) Thamnopora boloniensis (Gosselet, 1877) Thamnopora reticulata (Blainville, 1830) Striatiopora? suessi Penecke, 1894 Rugosa: Thamnophyllum stachei Penecke, 1894 Zelophyllia cornuvaccinum (Penecke, 1894) Do you feel that there is something strange with this list? Yes, it is! Most species have their type locality within this formation and were first described by Penecke, except T. boloniensis (T. reticulata was also erected by Penecke as Pachypora orthostachys and later synonymized with an earlier described species). In my opinion, this does not reflect a high degree of endemism, but an urgent need for revision… The most abundant fossil is Favosites styriacus, which can form massive colonies up to 0.5 m in size. Here is an example from Hohe Rannach Mt. (1018 m) north of Graz, photo 05/26/2018, Col-Nr. 4093, length of pocket knife is 9 cm: As most fossils in this formation, it was found in scree and float in a wooded area. Nr. 4093 is waiting near the pocket knife toward the lower right corner… Another Favosites styriacus, north of Fürstenstand Mt. (754 m), northwest of Graz, photo 10/30/2015, not in collection. Tabulae are very well visible, weathering is usually your friend there!
  2. Hi! I just received a couple nice works on Fossils. In Index Fossils of North America (1959) I see Pycnostylus (Fletcheria) listed as a Tabulate! (Subclass Schizocoralla) (Whitleaves 1884) Fossilworks lists subclass Rugosa fosillid shows the following: Hill, 1981. Rugosa and Tabulata Ivanovskiy, 1965. Fossil Rugosa Wow! What a way to confuse a newbie! My specimens I found match the illustrations and descriptions in Index Fossils, I am happy to say. It must be the German in me, but I go nuts for accurate taxonomy (when I can get it). How can this change? How can it be BOTH rugosa and tabulata? Can it? I know some things change with further research.... but THIS should be fairly elementary!!??!! I know the index is older... but I would not think THIS would change much up to today! Species, yes. Even genus, perhaps. But subclass? Sorry if I'm a bit confused! Hoping someone can shed some light on this! David Ruckser
  3. ADAM's SILURIAN

    Hoooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrraaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Here we are at last, into Adam's Silurian. Thanks for looking. First up is the Lower Silurian or Llandovery and I begin with a problem. I posted this one incorrectly in Adam's Ordovician as it had got it's label muddled up with an Ordovician Favosites I had that has vanished in the move here, but is being replaced by kind forum member @Herb Anyway, this, I remember now I've found the correct label, is from the greenish Browgill Formation, part of the Stockdale Group from a cutting near Skelgill (Skelghyll) in Cumbria, Northern England. It seems to be a tabulate coral, but I can't find any listed for this location, only mentions of small, rare, rugose corals. It has the star shaped corallites of a Heliolitidid, but seems to be tightly packed together like a Favositidid. A couple of species of Palaeofavosites seem to be close and are a bit star-shaped,, but anyone know any better? @TqB@piranha hmm who else? The coral bit, an external mold, is a maximum of 3.5 cm across and each corallite up to 2 mm.
  4. H.A.Nicholson on tabulata

    As is (almost) customary in the 19th century,some bryzoans are thrown in with the corals Pleurodictyum
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