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Found 1,191 results

  1. Dinosaur tooth

    Hello, I bought this small tooth for 65€. It is labeled as Deltadromeus agilis but since a skull is still unknown i doubt this. I still bought it cause it is well preserved and the serrated edges are beautiful. I would label it "abelisaurid spec. indet." Or maybe a juvenile carcharodontosaurid? I'm curios for opinions.
  2. Tooth?

    Hello! Is it tooth fishes tooth? Ukraine, Lviv region. Thanks!
  3. Etobicoke Creek Fossil teeth?

    Hello, I am brand-new here and like new to fossils. Inspired by thefossilforum I went to the etobicoke creek and found this Fossil, which looks like equipped with a row of teeth. under the matrix on top of the row is a black mineral. Can anybody tell me what this is please
  4. T rex or nanotyrannus teeth

    Hello everyone, after having seen many pictures of "nanotyrannus" and t rex teeth i have some questions. The first one being, how can paleontologists distinguish nano teeth from rex teeth and also sell them for a different price when the current theory is that they are the same dinosaur, also in many cases I have seen nano teeth with the same size as t rex teeth differentiated, so if they are the same dinosaur how can this be possible? Thank you for your time.
  5. Hi all, I was recently offered this tooth from late Cretaceous of Orensburg, Russia. Most likely Gaisky City District. I can't figure out if it's a Polycotylid plesiosaur or Pterosaur tooth. The overall shape is closer to pterosaur than plesiosaur. However, I am not aware of pterosaur having wrinkling like that, nor do I know of pterosaur teeth being found there. What are your thoughts on this? Thank you.
  6. I found this tooth fragment in Kelly park rock springs run in apopka fl anyone know what it is?
  7. Hello there fossil forum! This post will actually contain some of my finds from 2 trips to the same location, namely the island of Bornholm in Denmark. I went there this summer, and made quite an interesting discovery, which I will get back to, and then went on yet another trip, which I got home from less than a week ago. I doubt many of you know about it, unless you're Danish or have an interest in the geology of Denmark, but most of Denmark was underwater for pretty much all of the Mesozoic era. That is, of course, with the exception of Bornholm, which is a geologist's/paleontologist's/amateur fossil collector's dream. Denmark is not well known for any dinosaur fossils whatsoever, except from a few teeth found in the Robbedale Formation, and a bunch of foot-prints scattered along the west and south-coast of Bornholm. As recent as last year in April though, someone discovered the very first dinosaur bone in Denmark, at Hasle Beach, Bornholm. It's supposedly from a young sauropod, and is still being studied at this very moment. After I heard of the discovery, I desperately wanted to go to Bornholm. So I went there for 5 days in July, and 7 days in October, where the second time, I brought some of my friends from my heavy metal band along with me. On the first trip, the very first day at Hasle Beach, I searched for about 5 hours along the beach, with not a single fossil in sight. Just as I was about to leave the beach to get something to eat, I stumbled upon a very odd looking rock. Which obviously wasn't a rock, it was a bone: It measured about 6x5x6 (LxWxH) cm. I brought this into the museum located at the island, called "Naturbornholm", which is where a lot of the fossils found on the island are showcased. I had some of the people from the museum take a look at it, and they agreed on that this was definitely bone. What was very unlikely about this bone however, is that it looks like the end of a limb-bone, meaning it probably wasn't a plesiosaur, but something that was able to walk on land. In Denmark there's a law concerning fossils, saying that if the fossil could be valuable to science, it is obliged to deliver it to the Geological Institute of Copenhagen for research. The bone is currently being examined and studied. I still haven't received any new information regarding the bone. However they have said, that there's a good chance it's probably from either a crocodile, turtle or dinosaur. Whatever the species might be, it is most likely also a new species, as most of the bone material found at Hasle are plesiosaur bones. I went digging in the exact same area for the rest of the days, in hope of finding other bone-pieces. The picture below shows other pieces I found, which according to the museum, are bone fragments. Some of them are very worn though, and covered with conglomerate and iron. They are in no way as well preserved as the slightly worn bone piece I found on the first day: Other than those, I found another piece of bone, however it is very hard to tell what it is from. I'm considering trying to open up the lump of sandstone, however the black layer of bone material is fragile. The picture quality might be bad on this one, but I can assure you, it is not coal or mineral: So after the first trip to the island of Bornholm, I was invited over there by some of the people from the museum in the autumn holiday. I brought some of my bandmates with me as well, in an attempt to up the amount of fossils we'd find. And we did find a lot of stuff. On the first day we started out slow. The guitarist from my band was the first person to find a fossil. He found a small tooth, which might be from a type of bony fish. We're currently talking with one of the paleontologists of the Geological Institute, who wants to have a look at it in person. It measures about 5 mm, and was cracked in half when found, but afterwards repaired. The second day, we went out digging up on the more northern side of Hasle Beach, where the cliff is a bit taller. We didn't find much though. The other guys went back to the hut after a few hours, and I worked my way back to the spot where I had been digging during the summer. Shortly after, I found a small fragment of bone, most likely a rib-fragment. It's probably not from a plesiosaur though, as all the plesiosaur ribs found on the beach are usually very round, and not flat. The next day, we all went to the museum, showing a few of the fossils we had found to the people we knew there. Other than that we took a look at all the awesome finds exhibited at the museum. Including 2 of the dromaeosauroides bornholmensis teeth found in the Robbedale Formation (1 of them was a replica though). Most of the dinosaur fossils found, as showcased by the museum, are trace-fossils. Dinosaur-tracks and coprolites, with the exception of the dromaeosaur teeth. However those are from the early cretaceous period (140 million years ago), while the place where we were digging, Hasle Beach (The Hasle Formation), is about 170-180 million years old. Later I went digging again the same day. Some of the others didn't feel like digging, so I went out alone. I searched in about the same area where I had found the bones last year, and got really lucky once again. First I found a nice jet-black hybodont shark tooth, measuring about 9 mm in length. Then a piece of fossil wood/branch shortly after. 2 hours after the last find, I decided to go back to the cabin we had rented not far from the beach, and once again I was super lucky, and then stumbled upon a large bone-piece! A plesiosaur paddlebone, measuring about 4x4x1 cm! The fourth day, the other guys wanted to get back in the game after showing them the paddlebone. The next day we found a couple of odd pieces, mostly shells, but also another tooth, this time it was a chimaera tooth. On the fifth day, we went to a slightly different location, about 4 km further south of Hasle Beach, at a place called "The Pyrite Lake", where there's an abundance of plant-fossils, but there has also been found a couple of plesiosaur teeth there, as well as large dinosaur tracks. These tracks, as shown at the museum, are not negatives however, but a "positive". As in, when the creature made the track, the track was filled up with mud or another sediment later, basically making a 'positive' "sculpt" of the foot so to speak. At the Pyrite Lake, we found some huge chunks of fossil wood. Some a tad too heavy to carry around in a rucksack. We did however also spot a very interesting-looking rock, that shared a big resemblance to the dinosaur-tracks at the museum. We sent the coordinates of this rock to the people at the museum, and they're gonna send a paleontologist out to take a look at it at some point, to try and determine, if it is indeed a dinosaur track. So it's going to be interesting to see, if this truly was made by a prehistoric animal, or if this is just a very funny looking rock. On the sixth, and last day of digging, we found a lot of odd looking fossils by Hasle Beach again, which we could not identify. One may have been a bigger, but crushed, hybodont tooth, trapped within a lump of sandstone. And another could be a rib or just some plant-material. Either way, we left a lot of the fossils at the museum, for them to take a look at, if any of it should hold any interest to them, or to the people of the Geological Institute of Copenhagen.
  8. Shark tooth ID

    Help please with identification. Western Ukraine, Lviv region. Thanks in advance!
  9. Shark tooth (Ukraine) ?

    Hello! Help please with ID. Western Ukraine, Lviv region. Neogene, Miocene.
  10. Hello all, What is the hardest teeth to obtain nowadays? It seems to change based on the export restrictions from other countries and rarity. I’m trying to expand my collection and want to see what our the ones to chase after. Thanks in advance
  11. So I was hunting for sharks teeth in my special secret spot not too far from home and I found something very unusual. In this area but not this specific honey hole, I have found fossil (deer bones, deer teeth, muskrat jaws, sand tiger shark teeth, Hemis, Bulls, Lemons, Meg pieces, one beat up small Meg, Mako teeth, and many broken larger shark tooth roots with large cusps on them. I know that cusped teeth are not common in Florida only really the sand tigers have them. Now I know what some people are going to suggest this tooth is. (I have posted a similar tooth to this one before asking for Identification). However this find has excited me so much. This is by far the nicest tooth to come from my special spot and I'm pretty sure its not a Chub Megalodon. Please share this with anyone who can give me a truly positive answer on what this tooth really is. Of all the Megatoothed shark teeth I have found this one is now my most unique. The area that this came out of is very under researched. All maps I have of it state Miocene with notes saying that the area is very data barren and that the sediment is mixed. I'm digging into the clay most of the time here and the colors are usually amazing since the tannin from the river hasn't touched some of these teeth yet. I want all of you'r honest opinions on this tooth. The cusps are well defined with a thick root and a thin tooth. This is also the second tooth of similar size that I have found here with the same cusps.
  12. Sharks tooth (Ukraine) ?

    Hello! Is it possible to identify? Ukraine, Lviv region.
  13. Teeth with maxilla and mandible present

    Good evening I just now found this tooth so I begin digging around and have discovered the maxilla in the mandible including a whole bunch of teeth! But they are falling apart! I have pieces parts of everything else besides this one tooth! Does anybody happen to know what animal would have A tooth like this?
  14. Hey guys I’m driving back from Panama City to Orlando Florida on Tuesday for work and wanted to ask if anyone has any suggestions for a spot I could stop off at on my drive home to go look for teeth or other fossils. Need to scratch that fossil itch. Land sites are probably my best bet for the hour I’ll have but I could stop by a river. Any suggestions would help. I’m obviously not asking for major spots as I also keep mine secret. Love to here from you guys.
  15. What is this tooth from?

    I work for an ecological restoration company and I work in rivers all the time. I find weird things from time to time, but I am stumped. Please help I know it’s a “petrified tooth” but I don’t know what it is from. Any ideas?
  16. Teeth (Ukraine) ?

    Are these teeth? Ukraine, Lviv region.
  17. On my way out of town after a family gathering at Starved Rock State Park (it was packed like crazy with people, but I was still able to get a quiet hike in early Sunday morning with my mom. The food at the Lodge is not bad at all, also!) I made time to stop by one of my favorite sites, a roadcut near Oglesby, IL. This steep, talus-covered slope is known to produce generous quantities of brachiopods, as well as rarer shark teeth, cephalopods, echinoderms, trilobites and coral, among other things, primarily from the Pennsylvanian La Salle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation. With the wet weather this year plants had grown wildly over the slope, but there was still plenty of rock to explore. I got out of my car, jumped over the little brook running through the ditch, and made my way up the slope. As erosion slowly eats away at the bluff, fresh boulders fall away and expose new things. A large section had fallen last year, and at the top of the slope I saw another section perilously close to breaking away, so I steered well clear of it. Caution is definitely required at this site, especially because of the risk of rock fall near the overhang, but also the danger of slipping on loose rock and falling- a good sense of balance is very helpful! Working my way carefully along the cut I began to find some interesting things. First up was this hash plate- it doesn't look like much here covered in mud, but in the middle are some Archaeocidaris sea urchin spines, and it also features a number of crushed brachiopods, including some with spines, as well as crinoid stem pieces and other bits. I have started cleaning it up, so I will need to take a picture of it after I'm done.
  18. Shark Teeth (Myrtle Beach)

    Hello again, I’m sure you all get tired of IDing so many shark teeth. However I’m not confident enough in my ability to properly identify these myself. I found them years back when I was at Myrtle Beach, SC. Thinking bottom right is sand tiger due to the upward curve. Bottom left lemon shark? Not sure about the rest. (I thought I knew at one point, but that was a long time ago.) Also, is there any way of getting an approximate age? Thanks, Nate
  19. Mammal Jaw? (Location unknown)

    Hi all, First time using the forum. I got this from a local rock and mineral show years back, but they gave me no information other than that it was a “prehistoric deer.” Using this, I did some research, and highly suspect that it could be the jaw of a Leptomeryx species (which would put it somewhere in N. America?). It definitely resembles the pictures I’ve seen. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
  20. Freshwater plesiosaur material from the Jurassic of China

    Hey everyone Thought I'd share with you this new paper I found on ResearchGate; it basically reports the first discovery of remains of freshwater plesiosaurs from the middle Jurassic of Gansu province (in China). Gao, T., Li, D.-Q., Li, L.-F., and Yang, J.-T. (2019). The first record of freshwater plesiosaurian from the Middle Jurassic of Gansu, NW China, with its implications to the local palaeobiogeography. Journal of Palaeogeography 8:27. Abstract: Plesiosaurs are one of the common groups of aquatic reptiles in the Mesozoic, which mainly lived in marine environments. Freshwater plesiosaurs are rare in the world, especially from the Jurassic. The present paper reports the first freshwater plesiosaur, represented by four isolated teeth from the Middle Jurassic fluviolacustrine strata of Qingtujing area, Jinchang City, Gansu Province, Northwest China. These teeth are considered to come from one individual. The comparative analysis of the corresponding relationship between the body and tooth sizes of the known freshwater plesiosaur shows that Jinchang teeth represent a small-sized plesiosaurian. Based on the adaptive radiation of plesiosaurs and the palaeobiogeographical context, we propose a scenario of a river leading to the Meso-Tethys in the Late Middle Jurassic in Jinchang area, which may have provided a channel for the seasonal migration of plesiosaurs. Keywords: Freshwater plesiosaur, Middle Jurassic, Jinchang, Gansu Province, Palaeobiogeography. Here's the PDF of the article Gao et al2019Freshwater Chinese plesio.pdf Hope you all have a nice day! -Christian
  21. Dromaeosaurus Teeth?

    Ive been looking for a true dromaeosaurus tooth for a while now. Ive only been able to grab acheroraptor. Does anyone know of a reputable site or seller selling any?
  22. Sharks teeth (Ukraine)?

    Hello! Help with identification please. Western Ukraine, Lviv region.
  23. Basilosaur lower frontal jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Basilosaur(us?) frontal lower jaw seyction, from Boujdour, in Morocco. Hopefully the species can be distinguished with some more info
  24. Basilosaur frontal lower jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Almost the entire frontal canine portion of the lower jaw of a Basilosaur. As you can see, the area where the absent front canines were, at the tip of the piece is visible, as well as where the missing last canines were situated. Although it was labeled as a Basilosaurus, I’m a little hesitant to consider that the case until I can personally corroborate the information. Apparently from Boujdour, I’m just having trouble finding information about which whales are, or are not found there, so until then I’ll leave it more open with just Basilosaur.
  25. I'd love some thoughts on some of these recent finds from Sharktooth Hill. Thanks in advance! These ones, I think, are porcupinefish mouth plate pieces, but I have no experience with them. These seem like fish teeth. Parrotfish or related??? The two views are the same pieces, with interesting "toothy" parts on both surfaces. I can see the bottom pic maybe showing palatine teeth??? And finally this has me totally stumped. While collecting we saved it saying, "that's gotta be something" still still don't have a clue. Bottom pic is side view.
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