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Found 608 results

  1. Extraordinary Common Teeth

    Hey guys, I've been off the radar for awhile .. work you know .. been working on Siggraph for those of you who are familiar with software development. Just wanted to start a new topic here .. This one is right at 3.00" - 7.62cm C. carcharias Bahia Inglesa Formation South of Caldera Provincia Copiapo III Regio de Atacama Chile
  2. 4 Moroccan teeth

    Hi all, At the local market yesterday I bought these 4 teeth (in total for a very low price). All 4 are said to come from Morocco, but the seller didn't say the exact location. But I suppose that they are either from Kem Kem or Khouribga. Anyways I would just like your opinion on them (what species, 100% original or slightly reconstructed, anything I could do to "improve" them, etc). Thanks in advance! Best regards, Max Tooth #1: sold as a spinosaur tooth (so I suppose it's from Kem Kem).
  3. Well it has been a very long time since I have started a post on here (been too busy collecting) but I wanted to share my thoughts on establishing 'provenance' before a fossil purchase. What is provenance? Simply put establishing the provenance of a fossil is all about establishing its origin and includes things like: Where was it found (location)? Who found it? When was it found etc. This is also strongly linked to the value of the fossil for example two identical specimens one with solid provenance the other with nothing can be the difference between a fossil that is priceless and one that is worthless. In this same way a museum could potentially view a fossil given to them with no history as nothing more than a rock, as it has lost all scientific value. Good dealers do a great job collecting as much provenance as they can in order to get top dollar for their specimens, this might include only purchasing directly from the digger, providing in-situ photos of the fossil when it was discovered and/or prepared as well as very detailed location and collection data. Astute collectors also will understand that the better the provenance a fossil has the more valued and prized it will be. People sometimes underestimate just how easy it is to fake a fossil and we can get caught up trying to avoid undisclosed enhancements, repairs and restoration that we don't stop and ask all the right questions. Below is a simple table that I use (until today kept in my head) to help grade fossils in my collection as to how authentic they are and how strong their provenance is. It is important to note that the majority of my collecting is centred around dinosaur teeth and as such establishing correct id's is much harder than on some other groups of fossils. The horizontal line looks at who discovered the fossil and how many degrees of separation are there between you and that person, as well as looking into how trustworthy the seller is (have they been caught out in the past, have they sold other misrepresented pieces). This line looks at the people and relationships element and delves into the integrity, reputation and personal brand of the individual. The vertical line looks at the more practical aspects of the fossil itself and although I have used very brief descriptions this part is about how much homework have you the buyer done? Have you compared the specimen to others sold? Have you dug up journals or PDF's on that formation and the creatures that live in it? What diagnostic features will prove or disprove the id? Once a red flag is found its important to ask the question and seek clarification. Finally the colours... The colours simply represent the level of risk involved in making a purchase. Starting with BLUE as the least risky building all the way up to RED which in my opinion should be avoided at all cost. These colours are nothing more than a guide and there are multiple other considerations that could affect the level of provenance and all need to be considered. At the end of the day a perfect 5 inch theropod tooth that has no provenance and doesn't match could still be a great acquisition if the price is cheap enough. The "scores" in the boxes are just me playing around with formulas and overcomplicating things. Hopefully this has been a useful read and gives you all some deeper perspective on the subject, happy to hear peoples thoughts and comments if there are any :-)
  4. Hi! I'm trying to run an experiment on a fossil which has had some prep work done on it. The teeth are glued into the alveoli. However, part of my experiment requires that I remove the teeth and fill in the alveoli. I was wondering how I could accomplish this in the least damaging way? There are some unerupted teeth present, which I know from having x-rayed the fossil. Thanks!
  5. I was going through a large group of very small Triassic coprolites today and came upon this. Since there was a beat up Koskinonodon tooth in with the coprolites, I'm wondering if this could be a jaw or maxillary fragment from a juvenile. The person who found the coprolites said that he found a lot of Koskinonodon teeth in the area as well some from Phytosaur, Apachesaurus, Coelophysis, Postosuchus, and Revueltosaurus. What do you all think? Jaw or maxillary? Amphibian, fish or something else? If this is amphibian, can anyone identify the bone above and to the left of the teeth? My cat votes amphibian @Carl check it out!
  6. I would like to get some fossils to seed some areas for both my sons to find some interesting things and to better learn the diversity of what is out there. I was thinking shark teeth , ammonites and trilobites stuff like that can any one help with this. I could ether trade or buy doesn't matter I'm just looking for a variety of stuff.
  7. Shark teeth unidentified

    Here are several teeth from Late Albian of Ukraine (Kanev region). Help with identification will be very appreciated. Other fossils from this site 1. Tooth is fairly worn, but it should preserve the original shape (no cusplets). Root is poorly preserved, but is it possible to determine who it came from? I am thinking about an early Anacoracid or a Carcharhiniform (Triakidae)? By the way, Anacoracids are extremely rare there, so there is really nothing for comparison. 2. Most likely a tiny Synechodus crown, but the shape looks weird for Synechodus. Could it be a Scyliorhinid? 3. Anacoracid? It has some serrations on the distal side. Also thought about Squaliform, but the root looks more lamnoid-like. 4. Scyliorhinid or Lamnoid?? 5. Almost 100% sure it is a Hemiscylliidae, but is it possible to determine the genus? I am leaning towards Chilloscyllium, but not sure.
  8. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since October 18, 2017. Order Saurischia Suborder Theropoda General Theropoda General Theropoda - Africa/Middle East Fanti, F. and F. Therrien (2007). Theropod tooth assemblages from the Late Cretaceous Maevarano Formation and the possible presence of dromaeosaurids in Madagascar. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(1). Fanti, F., et al. (2014). Integrating palaeoecology and morphology in theropod diversity estimation: A case from the Aptian-Albian of Tunisia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 410. Galton, P.M. and R.E. Molnar (2012). An unusually large theropod dinosaur tooth from the Kirkwood Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of South Africa. N.Jb.Geol.Palaont.Abh., 263/1. Knoll, F. and J.I. Ruiz-Omenaca (2009). Theropod teeth from the basalmost Cretaceous of Anoual (Morocco) and their palaeobiogeographical significance. Geol.Mag., 146(4). Mateer, N.J. (1987). A New Report of a Theropod Dinosaur from South Africa. Palaeontology, Vol.30, Part 1. Niedźwiedzki, G. and G. Gierliński (2002). Isolated theropod teeth from the Cretaceous strata of Khouribga, Morocco. Geological Quarterly, 46(1). Novas, F.E., F. Dalla Vecchia and D.F. Pais (2005). Theropod pedal unguals from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Morocco, Africa. Rev.Mus. Argentino Cienc.Nat., n.s., 7(2). Ray, S. and A. Chinsamy (2002). A theropod tooth from the Late Triassic of southern Africa. J.Biosci., 27. Richter, U., A. Mudroch and L.G. Buckley (2012). Isolated theropod teeth from the Kem Kem Beds (Early Cenomanian) near Taouz, Morocco. Palaontol.Z., 87(2). (Author's personal copy) Sampson, S.D., et al. (1998). Predatory Dinosaur Remains from Madagascar: Implications for the Cretaceous Biogeography of Gondwana. Science, Vol.280. Serrano-Martinez, A., et al. (2016). Isolated theropod teeth from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the early dental evolution of Spinosauridae. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(2). Sereno, P.C., et al. (1996). Predatory Dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous Faunal Differentiation. Science, Vol.272. General Theropoda - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Mo, J.-Y. and X. Xu (2012). Large theropod teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of Jiangxi, southern China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 53(1). Obsorn, H.F. (1924). Three New Theropoda, Protoceratops Zone, Central Mongolia. American Museum Novitates, Number 144. General Theropoda - Australia/New Zealand Benson, R.B.J., et al. (2012). Theropod Fauna from Southern Australia Indicates High Polar Diversity and Climate-Driven Dinosaur Provinciality. PLoS ONE, 7(5). Long, J.A. (1995). A theropod dinosaur bone from the Late Cretaceous Molecap Greensand, Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 17. Long, J.A. and A.R.I. Cruickshank (1996). First record of an Early Cretaceous theropod dinosaur bone from Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 18. Thulborn, T. (1998). Australia's Earliest Theropods: Footprint Evidence in the Ipswich Coal Measures (Upper Triassic) of Queensland. GAIA, Number 15. General Theropoda - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Averianov, A.O. and A.A. Yarkov (2004). Carnivorous Dinosaurs (Saurischia, Theropoda) from the Maastrichtian of the Volga-Don Interfluve, Russia. Paleontological Journal, Vol.38, Number 1. Delsate, D. and M.D. Ezcurra (2014). The first Early Jurassic (late Hettangian) theropod dinosaur remains from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Geologica Belgica, 17/2. Gerke, O. and O. Wings (2016). Multivariate and Cladistic Analysis of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany. PLoS ONE, 11(7). (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Madzia, D. (2014). The first non-avian theropod from the Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(4). Mateus, I., et al. (1998). Upper Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur embryos from Lourinã (Portugal). Memorias da Academia de Ciencias de Lisboa, Vol.37. Mateus, O., A. Walen and M.T. Antunes (2006). The Large Theropod Fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its Similarity to the Morrison Formation, With a Description of a New Species of Allosaurus. In: Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 36. Naish, D. (1999). Theropod dinosaur diversity and palaeobiology in the Wealden Group (Early Cretaceous) of England: evidence from a previously undescribed tibia. Geologie en Mijnbouw, 78. Rauhut, O.W.M. and A. Hungerbühler (1998). A Review of European Triassic Theropods. GAIA, Number 15. Rauhut, O.W.M. and J. Kriwet (1994). Teeth of a big Theropod Dinosaur from Porto das Barcas (Portugal). Berliner geowiss. Abh., E 13. Torices, A., et al. (2015). Theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of the South Pyrenees Basin of Spain. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(3). General Theropoda - North America Dalman, S.G. (2014). New data on small theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Como Bluff, Wyoming, USA. Volumina Jurassica, XII(2). Fiorillo, A.R. and R.A. Gangloff (2000). Theropod Teeth from the Prince Creek Formation (Cretaceous) of Northern Alaska, With Speculations on Arctic Dinosaur Paleoecology. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(4). Gates, T.A., L.E. Zanno and P.J. Mackovicky (2015). Theropod teeth from the upper Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation "Sue" Quarry: New morphotypes and faunal comparisons. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(1). Paul, G.S. (1988). Small Predatory Dinosaurs of the Mid-Mesozoic: The Horned Theropods of the Morrison and Great Oolite - Ornitholestes and Proceratosaurus - and the Sickle-Claw Theropods of the Cloverly, Djadokhta and Judith River - Deinonychus, Velociraptor and Saurornitholestes. Hunteria, Vol.2, Number 4. Sankey, J.T., et al. (2002). Small Theropod and Bird Teeth from the Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian) Judith River Group, Alberta. J.Paleont., 76(4). Sarigul, V. (2017). New Theropod Fossils from the Upper Triassic Dockum Group of Texas, USA, and a Brief Overview of the Dockum Theropod Diversity. PaleoBios, 34. Williamson, T.E. and S.L. Brusatte (2014). Small Theropod Teeth from the Late Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, Northwestern New Mexico and Their Implications for Understanding Latest Cretaceous Dinosaur Evolution. PLoS ONE, 9(4). General Theropoda - South America/Central America/Caribbean Canale, J.I., et al. (2017). The oldest theropods from the Neuquen Basin: Predatory dinosaur diversity from the Bajada Colorada Formation (Lower Cretaceous: Berriasian-Valanginian), Neuquen, Argentina. Cretaceous Research, 71. Candeiro, C.R.A., P.J. Currie and L.P. Bergqvist (2012). Theropod teeth from the Marília Formation (Late Maastrichtian) at the paleontological site of Peirópolis in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Geociências, Vol.42(2). Ezcurra, M.D. (2009). Theropod remains from the uppermost Cretaceous of Colombia and their implications for the palaeozoogeography of western Gondwana. Cretaceous Research, 30. (Author's personal copy) Ezcurra, M.D. and F.E. Novas (2016). Theropod dinosaurs from Argentina. Novas, F.E., et al. (2013). Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research, xxx. (Article in press) Rauhut, O.W.M. (2007). A fragmentary theropod skull from the Middle Jurassic of Patagonia. Ameghiniana, 44(2). General Theropoda Brink, K.S., et al. (2015). Developmental and evolutionary novelty in the serrated teeth of theropod dinosaurs. Scientific Reports, 5:12338. (Thanks to doushantuo for finding this one!) Chure, D.J. (1998). On the Orbit of Theropod Dinosaurs. Gaia, Number 15. Foth, C. and O.W.M. Rauhut (2013). Macroevolutionary and morphofunctional patterns in theropod skulls: A morphometric approach. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(1). Gatesy, S.M., M. Baker and J.R. Hutchinson (2009). Constraint-Based Exclusion of Limb Poses for Reconstructing Theropod Dinosaur Locomotion. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 29(2). Gilmore, C.W. (1920). Osteology of the Carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, With Special Reference to the Genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. United States National Museum, Bulletin 110. (213 pages) Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (1998). Global Correlation of the Triassic Theropod Record. GAIA, Number 15. Hendrickx, C. and O. Mateus (2012). Ontogenetical changes in the quadrates of basal tetanurans. Hendrickx, C., O. Mateus and R. Araujo (2015). A Proposed Terminology of Theropod Teeth (Dinosauria, Saurischia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, e982797. Hendrickx, C., S.A. Hartman and O. Mateus (2015). An Overview of Non-Avian Theropod Discoveries and Classification. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 12,1. Holtz, T.R. (1998). A New Phylogeny of the Carnivorous Dinosaurs. GAIA, Number 15. Holtz, T.R. (1998). Theropod Paleobiology, More Than Just Bird Origins. GAIA, Number 15. Hone, D.W.E. (2010). Dinosaurs of a Feather. BCAS, Vol.24, Number 2. Hone, D.W.E. and O.W.M. Rauhut (2010). Feeding behaviour and bone utilization by theropod dinosaurs. Lethaia, Vol.43. Larson, D.W. and P.J. Currie (2013). Multivariate Analyses of Small Theropod Dinosaur Teeth and Implications for Paleoecological Turnover through Time. PLoS ONE, 8(1). Larsson, H.C.E., P.C. Sereno and J.A. Wilson (2000). Forebrain Enlargement Among Nonavian Theropod Dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(3). Lautenschlager, S., et al. (2013). Edentulism, beaks, and biomechanical innovations in the evolution of theropod dinosaurs. PNAS, Vol.119, Number 51. Padian, K., J.R. Hutchinson and T.R. Holtz (1999). Phylogenetic Definitions and Nomenclature of the Major Taxonomic Categories of the Carnivorous Dinosauria (Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 19(1). Rauhut, O.W.M. (2003). The Interrelationships and Evolution of Basal Theropod Dinosaurs. The Palaeontological Society, Special Papers in Palaeontology Number 69. (214 pages) Rayfield, E.J. (2005). Using Finite-Element Analysis to Investigate Suture Morphology: A Case Study Using Large Carnivorous Dinosaurs. The Anatomical Record Part A, 283A. Rothschild, B. and D.H. Tanke (2005). 18. Theropod Paleopathology: State-of-the-Art Review. In: The Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Carpenter, K. (ed.), Indiana University Press. Schmerge, J.D. and B.M. Rothschild (2016). Distribution of the dentary groove of theropod dinosaurs: Implications for theropod phylogeny and the validity of the genus Nanotyrannus Bakker et al., 1988. Cretaceous Research, 61. Smith, J.B., D.R. Vann and P. Dodson (2005). Dental Morphology and Variations in Theropod Dinosaurs: Implications for the Taxonomic Identification of Isolated Teeth. The Anatomical Record Part A, 285A. Snively, E., A.P. Russell and G.L. Powell (2004). Evolutionary morphology of the coelurosaurian arctometatarsus: descriptive, morphometric and phylogenetic approaches. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 142. Stevens, K.A. (2006). Binocular Vision in Theropod Dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26(2). Therrien, F. and D.M. Henderson (2007). My Theropod is Bigger Than Yours...or Not: Estimating Body Size from Skull Length in Theropods. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(1). Therrien, F., D.M. Henderson and C.B. Ruff (2005). 10. Bite Me. Biomechanical Models of Theropod Mandibles and Implications for Feeding Behavior. In: The Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Carpenter, K. (ed.), Indiana University Press. Zelenitsky, D.K. (2006). Reproductive Traits of Non-Avian Theropods. J.Paleont.Soc. Korea, Vol.22, Number 1.
  9. Went to Big Brook NJ for the first time this summer with the kids. Liked it so much we went back several times. For first timers we were very happy with the hauls. May look rather plain to the seasoned people here but wanted to share. Thanks, Jason
  10. A friend of mine proposed to buy this piece. What do you think? thanks to everybody
  11. 'Heterodontus' upnikensis

    A - lateral; B, C, D - anteriors. Anterior teeth have typical of Heterodontus V-shaped root and marked cutting edge. Unlike H. canaliculatus anteriors, anteriors of ‘H.’ upnikensis have more convex labial side (so that cutting edge is situated in the middle of the lateral surface) and no lateral cusplets. Crown generally widens near the base, so most teeth have regular triangle shape of a labial face. Teeth located closer to symphysis display more mesiodistally compressed crowns. Enamel is smooth on both faces. Lateral teeth are also different from H. canaliculatus: they have lower and shorter central occlusal ridge and lateral ridges are highly anostomosed on both sides, so that complete tooth ornamentation has a net-like appearance. ‘Heterodontus’ upnikensis is an enigmatic species. No associated tooth set has been found yet, consequently it is impossible to tell that a given set of laterals actually belong to ‘H.’ upnikensis. There is a possibility that lateral teeth described here as ‘H.’ upnikensis here belong to another Heterodontus species not represented by anteriors in Kanev collection. They were assigned to this species because there is generally some degree of tooth plan similarity between anteriors and laterals of the same species. Laterals described here have: 1) relatively weak and short central occlusal ridge; this trait is similar to ‘H.’ upnikensis shorter cutting edge because of lateral cusplet absence; 2) more bilateraly symmetrical crown shape and ornamentation across the central occlusal ridge than in H. canaliculatus; this feature is analogous to relatively equal thickness of labial and lingual face on ‘H.’ upnikensis anterior teeth. Also, anteriors of ‘H.’ upnikensis are a lot more common in studied locations than H. canaliculatus, and the same trend applies to two found Heterodontus lateral teeth morphotypes with H. canaliculatus teeth being a lot scarcer.
  12. Phytosaur

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Machaeroprosopus=Pseudopalatus? Bull Canyon FM, New Mexico
  13. Odontaspis or Jaeckelotodontid???

    From the album Eocene vertebrates of Ukraine

    Unidentified lamnoid anterior
  14. Ghost tooth

    So I'm cruising the bottom in really, really strong current. We're talking get-out-your-screwdriver-and-hang-on-for-dear-life strong. I've got a butt-load of lead on me, though, so I'm able to make some headway with my screwdriver. I find a few smaller teeth and put them in my pouch--a real trick with the current hammering you. So the next small tooth I run across, a pretty little lower mako, I have a little argument with myself before picking it up. Finally I figure, what the hell, and grab it. While I'm putting it in my bag, a big, ghostly white triangle appears right under my nose. As I look, I realize it's a megalodon blade, half-buried in the sand. Darn thing is almost pure white, I only noticed after staring right at it for about ten seconds. If I hadn't stopped to grab that mako, never would've even noticed. So I put a finger under the blade, thinking, "there's no way this thing is whole, that would just be too perfect." I lifted. And whaddaya know, darn thing was all there! It dried beautifully. My first white meg. It comes in right at four inches.
  15. More Big brook nj

    Couldn't fit the pic in my post. Cone shape objects I suspect are just rocks but wanted to pass it by the forum. Thanks, Jason
  16. Chew on this... please.

    I thought these were horse teeth, but after some poking around I'm thinking they're bison teeth. Please, help with identification and geological era. I'm starting with photos of the two that look like bone, in what stage I don't know, but do have three more (one large and two small) that I believe to be completely fossilized teeth from the same animal. All were found in Bucks County, Carversville exactly, in or near a creek bed at the bottom of a ridge of cliffs, which, we've been told, is a very special geological location where finds are not typical of the surrounding area. Because I could not wait to get another photo with a point of reference for size, I must include my best estimation from memory: the larger piece is approximately 2" long and 1/2-3/4" deep and not quite 1 1/2" wide The smaller of the two pieces can be referenced by the larger, but is about the size of my index finger from the first knuckle to top. I'll wait to post the photos of the possible complete fossilized pieces, I'm sure I will need to be more diligent including all needed info in the photos I choose to post. For now, I hope this is enough, do tell!
  17. Striatolamia intermediate tooth

    Intermediate tooth of S. macrota.
  18. The coast of Somerset is famous for one of the exposures of the Rhaetian Penarth formation, which is better known from Aust, where it is better exposed. It contains many reptile bones, fish scales, shark teeth, fin spines, coprolites, that sort of thing. On my last visit I didn't find any of the blocks which contain large bones, but I did find some containing large numbers of tiny teeth and very small bones. These blocks can be broken down to reveal large quantities of fossils. These teeth are absolutely tiny, some as small as 1mm across and none bigger than 3mm. They can barely be made out by the naked eye, except as a shiny black dot on the rock. 75mp panorama of one of the larger teeth (approx 3mm) I placed this tooth on a magazine to illustrate scale. The letters are standard small print.
  19. Striatolamia intermediates

    From the album Eocene vertebrates of Ukraine

    3 intermediates, most likely from Striatolamia macrota.
  20. Flag Pond, MD ID Help Needed Part 2

    Also found at Flag Pond this summer. I would love help IDing these as well! Thank you!! #1 (approximately 1 inch) #2 #3 (approx 1/2 inch) #4 (1 inch x 1/2 inch x 1/2 inch)
  21. Protoshyraena

    From the album Albian vertebrates of Ukraine

    Size 2 cm.
  22. Striatolamia posterior

  23. Female Physogaleus

    From the album Eocene vertebrates of Ukraine

    A - female anterior B, C - female laterals
  24. Notorynchus kempi

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