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Found 65 results

  1. Anyone recognize this?

    Any recognize this? I have come across a few of these recently in the Lebanon limestone in middle TN, mid/late ordovician. Most have been much smaller. This one still has a thin layer of matrix over much of the surface (with a fragment of a graptolite), but it's the only one I have a photo of. Thanks
  2. So in late June early July my wife, 2 boys (8 & 2.5), my father in-law and mother-in-law and I are going to take a 2 week road trip around the US. We'll be leaving Maryland and heading down to Memphis, Tennessee followed by Nashville then on to Texas and ending up in Albuquerque, New Mexico at my brother-in-law's for a few days, then off to the Grand Canyon, up to Dinosaur National monument, over to Hot Springs, South Dakota to the Mammoth site, Mt Rushmore, and Crazy Horse Monument, then to the Badlands in South Dakota, and then start making our way back to home. We're taking some new paths and going back over some previous ones. I am interested in doing 1-2 hour fossil and/or rock and mineral collecting leg stretches not terribly far off US 40 between Memphis and Albuquerque. Honestly anywhere else near the places I listed and anywhere along US 90 back to Chicago and down to Indianapolis, then US 70 the rest of the way east towards home. I'm hoping if I ask on here I can get a handful of options for the trip, we may only do two or three depending on time, weather and general feedback from the rest of the family. I have messaged PFooley about the Albuquerque/Rio Puerco area. After we get back I will have to make a write up of the adventure, it should be a great trip full of geologic and paleontological fun. Thanks for any information, Adam
  3. Young Tennessee girl finds 475 million year old fossil by Kaylin JorgeThursday, May 3rd 2018 http://fox17.com/news/local/young-tennessee-girl-finds-475-million-year-old-fossil Tech Times http://www.techtimes.com/articles/226764/20180503/11-year-old-tennessee-girl-discovers-475-million-year-old-fossil-of-a-trilobite-near-a-lake.htm WAVY TV, Dandridge, Tennessee http://www.wavy.com/news/national/tennessee-girl-finds-475-million-year-old-fossil/1157469113 Yours, Paul H.
  4. Brownsport Formation, Tennessee ID Help

    I had bought this piece along with a bunch of other stuff since I thought it was interesting. The guy I got it from thought it was maybe a big Trilobite pygidium, but I think not. Honestly no idea what it could be, any suggestions?
  5. This past Saturday was cold and windy in middle Tennessee, with occasional sleet and snow showers. I decided to do something other than hunt fossils due to the weather. However, by late in the day, the wind had died down and skies were clearing, so I decided to stop at a road cut on the way home. This cut exposes about 25 ft of the lower Lebanon Limestone, Ordovician. The Lebanon is rich in fossils, often with excellent detail, but the thin limestone layers can be extremely hard. This usually results in the fossils weathering faster than the rock, so the best way to find something nice, is if it's inverted. As always, I'm looking for trilobites, and the Lebanon has a diverse assemblage, but finding complete, articulated specimens is very rare. After several years of sporadic hunting, I have never found a single complete trilobite in the Lebanon, but I have seen a few, so they do exist. The sun was was getting low, and the light was not great, but I had at least 30 minutes to check out the cut. I had checked this same cut a few years ago, but only briefly, late in the day, after hunting other cuts nearby, so my tired eyes had not seen much. I recently learned that some rare trilobites had been found at this same cut, so I really wanted to give it a better look. Just 10 minutes into my hunt, and only 50 ft from the car, I glanced up at the top of the talus pile and immediately spotted this Gabriceraurus! I appears to be complete, although the pygidium is not visible.
  6. Big Honking Isotelus

    Stopped by a road cut this past Sunday to pick up some hash plates I found the previous weekend, but had to leave behind. The cut exposes a large section of the upper Carter's limestone and the Curdsville limestone member of the Hermitage formation, middle Ordovician. This is not far from where I found the nice 3D Isotelus a few weeks back. Within 5 minutes after I arrived, I looked down and spotted this huge enrolled, but very weathered Isotelus. Most of the lower portions were missing or very damaged. It is 5.5 inches (14 cm) wide, so if stretched out prone, it would have been 8-9 inches! While it's not in very good condition, it still shows the potential of this strata in the area. That's a big honking trilobite!
  7. Hemitoechia perryvillensis

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemitoechia perryvillensis Brachiopod Brownsport Formation along Hwy. 641 in Decatur County, Tennessee Silurian age (443 - 416 million years ago) The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Pylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Trigonirhynchiidae Genus: †Hemitoechia Species: †perryvillensis
  8. Hemitoechia perryvillensis

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemitoechia perryvillensis Brachiopod Brownsport Formation along Hwy. 641 in Decatur County, Tennessee Silurian age (443 - 416 million years ago) The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Pylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Trigonirhynchiidae Genus: †Hemitoechia Species: †perryvillensis
  9. Jaguar bone?

    This bone was found a few years ago in a large Tennessee cave. The location was about a mile from the only entrance. Someone had removed it from it's original location, and placed it on a rock next to the trail. The ends looked freshly broken, so I looked for hours trying to find the original location, just in case the ends were present, which would make identification much easier. No other bones were found, and this is the only large, ancient bone ever found in the deeper parts of the cave. I removed it from the cave (with permission), in hopes I could learn more about it. In a couple of areas in the cave, not too far away, many ancient tracks have been found that are thought to be from a pleistocene Jaguar. I know that identifying this bone may not be possible, but just thought I would share it here for opinions. Is there anything about it that would rule out Jaguar? Thanks
  10. Trilobite?

    I found this tiny fossil yesterday in the upper Carter's limestone in Tennessee. (middle Ordovician). It is 7mm long and appears to be the glabela of a trilobite. I'm not sure there is more to it under the matrix, and it's not much to go on, but thought I would share it here and see if anyone has any clue what it may be. Thanks
  11. Friend of mine found this specimen at Long Hunter State Park in Tennessee. Local geology is Ridley Limestone, Ordovician. Hard to tell without the head, but I thought it might interest some of you.
  12. Raymondites?

    Found this little guy yesterday in the Ordovician Carter's limestone, middle TN. Just a glabela and one eye, but clearly something different than the typical fossils from the Carter's. I'm thinking it may be Raymondites sp.?
  13. Ordovician sponge?

    I just pulled this out of a box of old fossils, but I'm not exactly sure where I originally found it. I think it is from the Carter's limestone, middle Ordovician, in the Nashville, TN area. It has a similar shape and size (~2 cm dia) to Hindia, but I have not seen anything else with this distinctive pattern of parallel criss-crossing ridges. Any ideas? Thanks
  14. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Emmonsia Coral, a Colony Coral SITE LOCATION: Beachriver Formation of the Brownsport Formation along Hwy. 641 in Decatur Co., Tennessee TIME PERIOD: Silurian Period (ca 430 mission years old) Favositida is an extinct suborder of prehistoric corals in the order Tabulata. The tabulate corals, forming the order Tabulata, are an extinct form of coral. They are almost always colonial, forming colonies of individual hexagonal cells known as corallites defined by a skeleton of calcite, similar in appearance to a honeycomb. Adjacent cells are joined by small pores. Their distinguishing feature is their well-developed horizontal internal partitions (tabulae) within each cell, but reduced or absent vertical internal partitions (septae). They are usually smaller than rugose corals, but vary considerably in shape, from flat to conical to spherical. Around 300 species have been described. Among the most common tabulate corals in the fossil record are Aulopora, Favosites, Halysites, Heliolites, Pleurodictyum, Sarcinula and Syringopora. Tabulate corals with massive skeletons often contain endobiotic symbionts, such as cornulitids and Chaetosalpinx. Like rugose corals, they lived entirely during the Paleozoic, being found from the Ordovician to the Permian. With Stromatoporoidea and rugose corals, the tabulate corals are characteristic of the shallow waters of the Silurian and Devonian. Sea levels rose in the Devonian, and tabulate corals became much less common. They finally became extinct in the Permian–Triassic extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Tabulata Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Emmonsia
  15. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Emmonsia Coral, a Colony Coral SITE LOCATION: Beachriver Formation of the Brownsport Formation along Hwy. 641 in Decatur Co., Tennessee TIME PERIOD: Silurian Period (ca 430 mission years old) Favositida is an extinct suborder of prehistoric corals in the order Tabulata. The tabulate corals, forming the order Tabulata, are an extinct form of coral. They are almost always colonial, forming colonies of individual hexagonal cells known as corallites defined by a skeleton of calcite, similar in appearance to a honeycomb. Adjacent cells are joined by small pores. Their distinguishing feature is their well-developed horizontal internal partitions (tabulae) within each cell, but reduced or absent vertical internal partitions (septae). They are usually smaller than rugose corals, but vary considerably in shape, from flat to conical to spherical. Around 300 species have been described. Among the most common tabulate corals in the fossil record are Aulopora, Favosites, Halysites, Heliolites, Pleurodictyum, Sarcinula and Syringopora. Tabulate corals with massive skeletons often contain endobiotic symbionts, such as cornulitids and Chaetosalpinx. Like rugose corals, they lived entirely during the Paleozoic, being found from the Ordovician to the Permian. With Stromatoporoidea and rugose corals, the tabulate corals are characteristic of the shallow waters of the Silurian and Devonian. Sea levels rose in the Devonian, and tabulate corals became much less common. They finally became extinct in the Permian–Triassic extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Tabulata Family: †Favositidae Genus: †Emmonsia
  16. Cretaceous Vertebrae

    Hello everyone, I found this in a Cretaceous deposit in West Tennessee. I am not sure what critter it comes from. I haven't had the time to really clean it up, so it had some matrix on it still. The sure contains marine reptiles, shark, and fish remains, and occasionally terrestrial material. Please let me know what you think and if you need more pictures. My thumb is about 3cm wide.
  17. Mammal Partial Jaw From Gray, TN

    Hello! A friend of mine found this fossil a long time ago on the grounds of Gray Fossil Site (before it was actually established). I believe it belongs to some sort of mammal, but since my main focus is on sharks and dinosaurs, I'm not quite sure. Anyone have an idea of what it may belong to?
  18. Please help ID

    Hi! My boys and I found this while exploring a river bed. Any ideas what it is? At first I thought we had found a tooth but researching suggests I may have found horn coral? Pictures I have found online are not that helpful so thought I would try here. So cool that we can find fossils right here where we live!
  19. Help with identifying

    Hoping someone can identify what I found. Found in Smyrna Tennessee July 31 2017. Size is 2" x 2" x 3/8" thick Thanks
  20. Mystery ID

    I recently found this piece hunting in a suburb of Chattanooga, TN. I'm unsure as to whether it's Ordovician or possibly early Mississippian due to some of my more recent finds. I personally think it's some type of coral, but not rugosa coral which I typically find.
  21. I found these 2 pieces antiquing in Tennessee (the shell?) and Florida (the coral piece). I realize these pieces didn't necessarily originate in these states...The color of the shell is interesting to me (goldish) and it has some sheen on some parts but not all over. (natural or lacquered?) What does the color tell us? It was in a baggie and simply labeled "fossil". The coral measures 5 1/4" tall. I know it's coral but was wondering if it is fossilized. Any info on either would be greatly appreciated. Fossil? Period? Any other interesting tidbits relative to where I found them, i.e. could this shell have been found in Tennessee? The coral, if a fossil, I'm assuming could have originated in Florida? I think they are beautiful and find them so interesting .
  22. Nonconnah creek Shelby county TN

    I spent about an hour digging a cut bank of Nonconnah creek in south Shelby county along the Mississippi Tennessee border just south of Memphis. I was told not to get my hopes up, but I think I may have found a few fossils! The item marked 3 is cylindrical and about 1cm long. I'm not sure about the large item with the pen cap for scale. The entire thing is about the size of a baseball, wasn't sure if the hole on top was just that, or possibly an eye of sort. (Same item is photographed from the back as well)
  23. Hi, I live in the Memphis, TN area, and I am wondering if there is anywhere local to find some fossils. I am new to the hobby, and I'm not very picky on what I'm hunting for. I have heard about finding gravel bars on the Mississippi River, and also nonconnah creek. I'm not sure where to start looking at either location. Any advice is appreciated, thanks in advance!
  24. Two cool fossils - no idea what they are

    Both of these were found in Middle Tennessee, not far from Nashville. The area is now a lake, but use to be a river before a dam was built. The first one with the indentations is about 3 inches in length. The one that looks like a bone (but probably isn't?) is about 5.5 inches long and 2.5 inches tall at its tallest point. Any ideas? thanks.
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