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Found 21 results

  1. Blair County, Pennsylvania (USA) Silurian... According to the map the likely guess is Clinton Formation, but my gut on site said "Wills Creek" Anyway, what do I have here? Small straight nautiloids or Tentaculites? How do you tell them apart?
  2. Fossilized Thumbtack

    Here is a piece I saved on a recent excursion to the Devonian Cedar Valley Formation of Iowa. It looks like a thumbtack!!! I am guessing a tentaculites abutting an ostrocod, but would like other opinions. Thanks, Mike
  3. Fall Break Fossil Trips

    The next few days are fall break for me, so I'm home from school. I decided to take the day today to explore two sites in Northern Illinois. The first is an outcrop of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Kendall County, IL. I learned about this site from a recent trip report posted here, and found it after a little detective work. I was hoping to find Tentaculites oswegoensis, a small conical fossil of unknown affinities which is only found in this area. It only took me a few minutes before I found a few. I only stayed for 20 minutes or so, as Tentaculites is really the only well preserved fossil in these exposures. There were some brachiopod and bryozoan fragments, but nothing noteworthy.
  4. Tentaculites

    From the album Eastern NY Fossil Hunts

    Tentaculites Devonian Found in 2018 from Glenerie, NY
  5. Ontario Ordovician conular items

    I've received a couple nice Upper Ordovician additions to my collection courtesy of @JUAN EMMANUEL and I'm finally posting them now... (Thanks Juan!) First, is this Tentaculites or Cornulites? I wish I could get better pics. Manitoulin Fm, Hamilton, ON.
  6. From the album Lower Devonian

    Tentaculites sp. (tentaculites with Discomyorthis oblata brachiopod) Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation Helderberg Group Interstate 88 road cut Schoharie, N.Y.
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  8. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  11. Monday I was in Schoharie County up on the Helderberg Plateau southwest of Albany, NY. In a roadside exposure of the Manlius Formation I picked up several pieces of rock with numerous Tentaculites specimens. There were also small brachiopods and ostracods. The Manlius Formation either represents the bottom of the Helderberg Group- the lowest of the Lower Devonian or the highest formation in the Silurian in New York. Tentaculites were originally thought to be related to mollusks or worms, but now are considered more closely related to brachiopods and bryozoans.
  12. tentaculites

    From the album Arkona

    Typical Tentaculites.
  13. tentaculites

    From the album Arkona

    Ever more Tentaculites. Arkona Fm.
  14. Tentaculites skin pattern?

    I have recently been looking over rock hash plates from Newberry, Mich. I think the formation is Collingswood, at any rate, there are cone shaped fossils all over many of the plates I brought home, ranging from a max of 4 " to as small as 1/4 inch. I previously asked about these, and most respondants seem to suggest some kind of Tentaculites. I can see the crushed shell in most with the tell tail impression down the center indication they were once round, but I have still been tryinig to figure out if they really are tentaculites, or perhaps orthocone larva...At any rate, my point for today is, one of the plates seem to have captured the skin impression clearly. I thought at first perhaps the 4" piece I was looking at was simply covered in some kind of bryazoan, but when I looked at the others on the same plate, they all contained the pattern, and it was way too perfect , fitting the fossil's form perfectly...it looks sort of like snake skin. I would appreciate any comments... thanks. I think the forum is great, it has moved me from a very beginner who saw stones I was sure were fossils, to a beginner who can occasionally tell the difference. LOL>
  15. Are there any papers available or known that extend the time domain of Tentaculites past the Devonian into the Permian?
  16. Tentaculites anglicus

    Some species are inferred to have been planktonic; the taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain.
  17. MF1

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    Two large crinoid stalks, 4 tentaculites, multiple brachiopods.
  18. Ordovician Prep Questions

    Hi all, It's been a few years since I've posted here, but I'm hoping to bring some order to my fossil collection and prep some specimens for display. I've tried to glean info from other threads in this sub-forum, but am still trying to figure out how best to approach preserving/restoring Ordovician fossils. As a for instance, how would others approach this rock? It's a piece from southeastern Indiana and contains what I've tentatively identified as Tentaculites sterlingensis and some Flexicalymene pieces parts. Is there any way to make the Tentaculites pop out a little more and clean it up without breaking up the actual fossils? The rock is about the size of my hand. I like how others have given that glossy dark finish to Flexicalymene trilobites; can that be done here? Thanks for any tips you have and I apologize if this is not the right place to post this particular question. -Andrew
  19. From the album Lower Devonian

    Tentaculites sp. Lower Devonian Glenerie Limestone Helderberg Group Route 9W road cut Glenerie, NY.
  20. Tentaculites

    From the album Lower Devonian

    Tentaculites Lower Devonian Manlius Formation Cobleskill, NY The status of the Manlius Formation is somewhere between the Lower Devonian and the Silurian.
  21. Tentaculites

    From the album Lower Devonian

    Tentaculites (preserved in silica) Lower Devonian Glenerie Limestone Tristates Group Route 9W road cut Glenerie, NY
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