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Found 42 results

  1. Hello, A colleague of mine shared some pictures of an interesting rock she found. It was found loose by a creek in the Denver area. It looks to me very much like an inner era, although it may well be something else. None of us are able to positively identify it. I'm sure someone here can confirm whether or not it is a fossil, and what it might be. The creek in question flows from the east, and my understanding is it would have to be a tertiary or quaternary fossil if it is indeed a fossil.
  2. Weaverlagerstusacastlehaynecoleteinkernschweizerbartsclagers07.pdf Rarely seen coleoid phragmocone steinkerns form the Eocene Castle Hayne Limestone of Southeastern North Carolina Patricia Wever,Charles Ciampaglio,Richard Chandler Palaeontographica,Abt.A/279,Lfg 4-6/Stuttgart,may 2007
  3. Ypresian Claiborne (Eocene,USA)

    Brachycarcharias atlasi (Arambourg, 1952), Eutrichiurides plicidens comb. nov., Galeorhinus louisi Adnet & Cappetta, 2008, Ginglymostoma maroccanum Noubhani & Cappetta, 1997, Gymnosarda sp., Mennerotodus sp., Rhizoprionodon ganntourensis (Arambourg, 1952), Stenoscyllium aff. S. priemi Noubhani & Cappetta, 1997, Trichiurus oshosunensis White, 1926 Hypolophodon sylvestris (White, 1931), Malacanthus? sulcatus (Koken, 1888), Meridiania cf. M. convexa Case, 1994, Palaeocybium proosti (Storms, 1897), Paraconger sector (Koken, 1888), Paralbula aff. P. marylandica Blake, 1940, Phyllodus toliapicus Agassiz, 1844, Propristis schweinfurthi Dames, 1883, Pycnodus sp., Pythonichthys colei (Müller, 1999), Scomberomorus stormsi (Leriche, 1905), Signata stenzeli Frizzell & Dante, 1965, and Signata nicoli Frizzell & Dante, 1965, and the first Paleogene occurrences in Alabama of a member of the Gobiidae Cuvier, 1816. A biostratigraphic analysis of our sample showed stratigraphic range extensions for several taxa, including the first Bartonian occurrences of Eoplinthicus yazooensis, Jacquhermania duponti (Winkler, 1876), Meridiania cf. M. convexa, Phyllodus toliapicus, and “Rhinobatos” here(HUGE!!!!!) meaning 76 MB European Journal of Taxonomy 585: 1–274 Taxonomy and biostratigraphy of the elasmobranchs and bony fishes (Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes) of the lower-to-middle Eocene (Ypresian to Bartonian) Claiborne Group in Alabama, USA,including an analysis of otoliths Jun A. EBERSOLE1, David J. CICIMURRI & Gary L. STRINGER @squali
  4. hexapoda/mantoidae/Oise /Pseudomantoida

    New Paleogene mantises from the Oise amberand their evolutionary importance THOMAS SCHUBNEL and ANDRE NEL Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 64 (4): 779–786. schuNELinsemantilagersthexapoapp006282019.pdf @Coco @fifbrindacier
  5. In preparation for a planned outing next week with my oldest son to hunt for fossils in the Lincoln Creek formation, I went to an outcrop of the local Blakely formation this afternoon, and now that I'm primed to spot concretions, I saw a few right away. I only grabbed one to bring home (just had a small bag), but I may go back and grab some more later. Since I lack the proper tools to prepare a fossil that's in a concretion (at least for now!), I just used my trusty hammer. I'm not really seeing any fossil remains here, but it does have a really interesting funnel shaped part coming out of one side. Maybe it's some kind of burrow that later filled with different sediment? Or just purely geological? There's also a lot more of the center bit to expose, but I didn't want to keep whacking once it shattered, since I'll probably just destroy any fossil remains that are in there. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Should I try to whack it one more time? Toss it? Secure it back together and save it for another day?
  6. Very ODD looking fossil I.D

    So I found this one near Tukwila Washington. I think the first one is just a clam of some kind and the second one I have NO IDEA. If anyone has a clue please let me know. I can take new pictures if needed. (Area I collected it from was in a mountain in Tukwila (more like a huge hill) and it used to be a shallow ocean back millions of years ago)
  7. The Republic of Washington

    PALEOALLIUM BILLGENSELI GEN. ET SP. NOV.: FOSSIL MONOCOT REMAINS FROM THE LATEST EARLY EOCENE REPUBLIC FLORA, NORTHEASTERN WASHINGTON STATE, USA Kathleen B. Pigg,1,* Finley A. Bryan,† and Melanie L. DeVore‡ Int. J. Plant Sci. 179(6):477–486. 2018. Pigg-Bryan-DeVore-lagerstUSAcenozoi2018-Paleoallium.pdf IMHO a nice marriage of paleontology and neontology,and pretty well illustrated,too RECOMMENDED
  8. Yorktown bivalves

    @sixgill pete VIRGINIA DIVISION OF MINERAL RESOURCESPUBLICATION 127PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWNAND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIALyle D. Campbell VIRGINIA DIVISION OF MINERAL RESOURCES PUBLICATION 127 PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWN AND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIA Lyle D. Campbell size: 63 MB Interestingly enough,extant D. can be found in the estuary of the Parnaiba River edit: Could be me,but the plates are awful edit two: which limits its use Taxonomical information / verbal descriptions/locaility details etc might be useful NOTE age of the paper
  9. lucinids

    DIJK John.D.Taylor and Emily A.Glover Hanging on-lucinid bivalve survivors from the Paleocene and Eocene in the Western Indian Ocean(Bivalvia:Lucinidae) Zoosystema,2018/v.40-7 about 6.2 MB RECOMMENDED! New genus: Retrolucina(previously Eomiltha) http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:DAFC3EBA-0C19-4D63-8248-65A6F761670A
  10. decapodal delights

    Carrie Schweitzer Additions to the Tertiary Decapod fauna of the Pacific Northwest of North America Journal of Crustacean Biology,21(2),521-537/2001 jcb0521.pdf newly designated species are mentioned in the tags size:0,245 MB,approximately an outtake:
  11. something in the way it moved

    ajslocomeigenshmathemaquantmethodrose93.11Macleod.pdf Norman Macleod and Kenneth D.Rose: Inferring locomotor behavior in Paleogene mammals via eigenshape analysis American Journal of Science,v.293-A,1993 Given that the Paleogene was a time of incipient mammal diversification...
  12. fossil wasps

    re I used this link because the PLOS link is too slow 76 Mb Citation: Spasojevic T, Wedmann S, Klopfstein S (2018) Seven remarkable new fossil species of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) from the Eocene Messel Pit. PLoS ONE 13(6): e0197477. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal. pone.0197477
  13. intriguing Sarmatian bryozoan

    pauldtayontoanbryozLBB_0038_1_0055-0064.pdf About 0,71 MB Recommended ,not in the least because of the stature of the first author. Short,well illustrated,informative Taylor et al:Unusual Early Development in A cyclostome bryozoan from the Ukrainian Miocene Linzer Biol.Beitr.38/1,2006
  14. Rahmat_phocarnivmammamarinel_2017_New_Miocene_Monachinae_from_the_Chesapeake_Bay.pdf Vestnik zoologii, 51(3): 221–242, 2017 NEW MIOCENE MONACHINAE FROM THE WESTERN SHORE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY (MARYLAND, USA) S. J. Rahmat¹*, I. A. Koretsky¹, J. E. Osborne², A. A. Alford² species decribed:Terranectes,Leptophoca,mostly postcranial material about 2,4 Mb ->urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:F727C8DF-EE1F-4A99-8EA5-647859C72E58 outtake:
  15. Death ray

    Giuseppe Marramà, Kerin M. Claeson, Giorgio Carnevale & Jürgen Kriwet(about 4 Mb) (2018) Revision of Eocene electric rays (Torpediniformes, Batomorphii) from the Bolca Konservat- Lagerstätte, Italy, reveals the first fossil embryo insitu in marine batoids and provides new insights into the origin of trophic novelties in coral reef fishes, Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 16:14, 1189-1219, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2017.1371257 Sensitive people should beware of figs. 15 and 16 I resisted the temptation (lover of classic photography) to work Man Ray in there somewhere
  16. Hello, I have been recently shopping around for fossil books that are more image heavy to look around at on my downtime, the few I have so far seem to be generally focused on all fossils and contain hardly any fossil vertebrates from the mesozoic or tertiary periods. Thus I am on the look out for any books that would be good fits, there was one I cannot remember the name for the life of me that I think is a large recent book that I've seen in B&N that goes over all time periods in full color with fossil photos/creature images, if anyone knows maybe which one that could be I was definitely on the lookout for it but any recommendations are awesome.
  17. NJ Brooks find

    Found this yesterday in Monmouth co. Normally a Cretaceous stream but tertiary items do occasionally pop up. At first I thought it was an iron concretion but has a slightly different hue to it. Don’t think it’s modern either...
  18. Bacchus Marsh Trip

    This weekend I went on another fossil hunting trip with my dad. We went to a place called Bacchus Marsh which is around 65 km east of Melbourne. Here we went looking for Tertiary plant fossils such as Laurus and Cinnamonum. The site was a creek bed under an old bridge. The bridge was located next to the Western Freeway which connects Bacchus Marsh to Melbourne, and extends north to south, eventually emptying into the Werribee river (about 2km away). The creek also goes under the freeway through two tunnels and you can look for fossils on both sides of the freeway, but the side near the bridge had the best rocks. The rocks we looked for were Ferruginous sandstones which are late Paleocene (59 million) to Middle Miocene (14 million). The creek was dry and it didn't look there had been water in it for a long time.
  19. Is this barnacle fossilized?

    I found this some years back at Pescadero Beach in California. I don't know if it's fossilized but if it is I think it would be from the Tertiary. Any help much appreciated.
  20. NALMA, SALMA, GABI

    FLYKOwswish this article has some bearing on the following issues: Mammal biochronology,the precise timing and/or speed of the G(reat)A(merican)B(iotic)I(nterchange),it contains some remarks on mammal taxa(however brief), magnetostratigraphic resolution from the Miocene to the Pleistocene, the closing of the Panama isthmus, and the possible diachroneity of mammal taxon appearances. There are NO taxa illustrated,and the authors' (infrequent)use of "heterochroneity " is unfortunate . If you have Woodburne(2012): this might be up your alley I liked it,but I'm weird that way
  21. NICE!!http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.2001663&type=printable 51 Mb,highly recommended, first description of a new species,Alcione. A cladistic analysis is included,BTW. Very ,very solid documentation of the material
  22. Hi, It's been a while since I've put anything up on here so it figured it would a good time to share some of my finds from this spring so far. With such a productive winter the start of this spring on the Bouldnor Fm. coast was a bit slow with several trips in which little was found (odd for what is usually a heavily productive site) but as March and April came round the finds started coming in faster and better. Access at Bouldnor is now very dangerous and pretty much impassable due to thick and deep silt and mud which has covered part of the beach (which I found out the hard way trying to get through), along with two recent cliff falls which have brought several oak trees down onto the beach. Hamstead and Cranmore are as good as ever with a lot of the winter's mudflows now eroding away and making the foreshore a lot easier. (Hamstead Ledge on a spring low tide) Mammal finds have been pretty nice so far this spring, as usual all Bothriodon, and alongside them I've also made some nice alligator and turtle finds including two partial Emys in-situ in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. Here are some of the highlights: 1. More pieces of the large Bothriodon mandible I first found in January have turned up scattered over the same area. I now have part of the hinge, two sections with P2 - M3 and a part of the underside of the mandible from further forward. I regularly check the site on my collecting trips so hopefully yet more of the jaw will turn up. (The positions of the fragments may be slightly off in the image below but it gives a general idea) 2. Bothriodon caudal vertebra. This is one of my favourite finds from this spring. I was originally excavating a small micro-vertebrate site when I felt the tool make contact with a large bone, I dug a bit deeper into the clay and found this vertebra with the processes fragmented around it. Luckily with a bit of super glue the processes were easily reunited with the vertebral body, after 33 million years apart. Unfortunately I couldn't locate the other transverse process or neural spine in the matrix nearby so I think they may have been broken off on the Oligocene coastal plain. 3. Bothriodon upper molar in a fragment of maxilla 4. Section of Bothriodon mandible with a nice mental foramen. Unfortunately no in-situ teeth with this one. 5. Section of mammalian limb bone with evidence of rodent gnawing. This was an in-situ find eroding out of the Upper Hamstead Mbr. on the foreshore. Gnaw marks like these are really common on in-situ material especially on limb bones. I don't think the rodents were scavenging the flesh off the bones, more likely they were extracting calcium and phosphate or were simply using it to grind down their continually growing incisors. Either way it shows that for at least a period a lot of these bones were exposed to the elements and accessible to the variety of rodents present on the coastal plain. 6. Nice quality Bothriodon intermedial phalange 7. Large Diplocynodon alligator frontal bone Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the finds! Theo
  23. awesom 11,3 Mb I just received a postcard from my retinae:"enjoying the Bahamas,won't be back anytime soon,you &*&(((()_+&@W" "And you may tell yourself :"This is not my beautiful fossil""
  24. Agatized Barnacle

    From the album ocean stuff

    Here was a nice surprise. I picked up this fossil cluster of barnacles and noticed a nice layer of agate underneath! When I processed the photo I took of it I saw that the light from my flash dispersed giving this rainbow effect. It's very small but now when I hold to the light I can see the little rainbows!
  25. Rodent Cheek Tooth

    Cheek tooth from the theridomyid rodent Isoptychus sp. Collected through screen washing of matrix from the 'White Band' a shallow freshwater lacustrine horizon.
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