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Found 10 results

  1. Unknown tetrapod head

    From the album Mazon creek assortment

    Confirmed by field museum as a tetrapod, species uncertain.
  2. A team from Harvard were in luck, finding tetrapod bones that could add to the story of life. =) http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/harvard-fossil-find-cape-breton-1.4311303
  3. Fossils We Want To Find.

    Fossils We Want To Find. There’s a list of fossils I’d really like you to go out and find. Good luck. By Darren Naish, Scientific American Blog, July 21, 2017 https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/fossils-we-want-to-find Yours, Paul H.
  4. Harvard team fossil hunting at Blue Beach, Nova Scotia Heather Desveaux, Chronicle Herald, June 22, 2017 http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1480307-video-harvard-team-fossil-hunting-at-blue-beach The Blue Beach Fossil Museum http://www.novascotia.com/see-do/attractions/blue-beach-fossil-museum/1611 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Beach Mansky, C.F. and Lucas, S.G., 2013. Romer’s Gap revisited: continental assemblages and ichno-assemblages from the basal Carboniferous of Blue Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada. The Carboniferous-Permian Transition. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 60, pp. 244-273. http://www.academia.edu/12658498/Romers_Gap_revisited_continental_assemblages_and_ichnoassemblages_from_the_basal_Carboniferous.. Yours, Paul H.
  5. If anybody has read any Shubin,Clack,Coates,etc:this is indispensable,IMHO dioja37592.pdf wonderful coloured diagrams in this one,this is one of them
  6. Scottish fossils tell story of first life on land, BBC News http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38186397 Evolution: First four-legged animals to walk on land found in 20 million year gap in fossil record, International Business Times UK – http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/mystery-20-million-years-missing-fossils-solved-five-new-species-1594933 The paper is: Clack, J. A., C. E. Bennett, ad many others, 2016, Phylogenetic and environmental context of a Tournaisian tetrapod fauna. Nature Ecology & Evolution 1, Article number: 0002 (2016) doi:10.1038/s41559-016-0002 http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-016-0002 Yours, Paul H.
  7. Newly Discovered Fossils Help Bucknell Professor Shed Light on Area’s Prehistoric Past by Matt Hughes Bucknell University, October 12, 2016 http://bucknell.edu/news-and-media/2016/october/newly-discovered-fossils-help-bucknell-professor-shed-light-on-area’s-prehistoric-past.html The GSA abstract is: Trop, J. M., and others, 2016, Paleoenvironmental Analysis of Late Devonian Tetrapod and Fish Assemblages from Catskill Formation Sites in North-Central pennsylvania. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. Vol. 48, No. 7 doi: 10.1130/abs/2016AM-278573 https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2016AM/webprogram/Paper278573.html https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2016AM/webprogram/Session41435.html Other related publications are: Daeschler, E.B., and Cressler, W.L., III, 2011. Late Devonian paleontology and paleoenvironments at Red Hill and other fossil sites in the Catskill Formation of north-central Pennsylvania. In R.M. Ruffolo and C.N. Ciampaglio [eds.], From the Shield to the Sea: Geological Trips from the 2011 Joint Meeting of the GSA Northeastern and North-Central Sections, pp. 1-16. Geological Society of America Field Guide 20. http://digitalcommons.wcupa.edu/geol_facpub/9/ http://digitalcommons.wcupa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1008&context=geol_facpub Cressler III, W.L., Daeschler, E.B., Slingerland R., and Peterson D.A. 2010. Terrestrialization in the Late Devonian: A palaeoecological overview of the Red Hill site, Pennsylvania, USA. In: Gaël Clement and Marco Vecoli [eds.], The Terrestrialization Process: Modelling Complex Interactions at the Biosphere-Geosphere Interface, pp. 111-128. The Geological Society, London 339. http://digitalcommons.wcupa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1009&context=geol_facpub https://works.bepress.com/walter_cressler/8/ http://digitalcommons.wcupa.edu/geol_facpub/10/ Trego, C., 2014, Paleoecological Analysis of a Late Devonian Catskill formation Using Vertebrate Microfossils. Departmental Honors in Biology paper, Lycoming College. http://www.lycoming.edu/library/archives/honors2.aspx#T http://www.lycoming.edu/library/archives/honorspdfs/Trego2014notice.uploaded.pdf http://www.academia.edu/12157494/Paleoecological_Analysis_of_a_Late_Devonian_Catskill_formation Yours, Paul H.
  8. Fedexia Striegeli

    Obviously, the tetrapod is from the Carboniferous Missippian...out by the old airport...does anyone know where that Casselman formation/Conemaugh Group is? Even though the Fedexia was found in 2004, it would be nice to resume some work and see what else is there...any ideas, any interest?
  9. Here's the link to the original blog post: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/somewhere-in-parrsboro-there-are.html A few days ago I drew a map of the West Bay/Cape Sharp area South-West of the town of Parrsboro, Nova Scotia. I had wanted to check the Jurassic age basalt cliffs of Cape Sharp and poke around a bit to see if I could come out with anything. On the cliffs on each side of Cape Sharp are Carboniferous sandstone cliffs which displays a fascinating record of trackways, especially those of tetrapods. I had marked on my makeshift map where the location of a possible access point to the beach would be. If that wasn't the case, I had a plan B, set by driving back towards Parrsboro and finding an access point via Partridge Island. I woke up Sunday (April 14th) morning and it was snowing. I said to myself: "Rain, Snow, or Shine, I'm heading down!". I hit the road at 7am that same morning. The temperature kept at about 0oC Celcius so the road conditions were pretty decent. The snow was melting as soon as it hit the pavement. I had checked the forecast the night before and they had called for higher temperature and a break in late morning. That was good enough for me. I got to the road leading to the supposed beach access by driving a red, muddy, slippery road with my Rabbit. My car is usually gray, but not this morning after my trip down here. I parked the car, got my gear, and headed down the path. Getting down the trail was somewhat annoying. Big trees had fallen at numerous spots and sometimes that meant I had to crawl in the mud or hop on the logs. I'm barely 5'2", so yeah it wasn't a pretty picture. Cape Sharp behind the snowy haze I got to the ledge of the cliff and there was somewhat of a 'trail' going down. It zigzagged a bit but the last 15 feet were just muck and loose sediment. I don't think that if I went down I could get myself back up. I tested the trail halfway and tried going back up. The face of the cliff was so loose and slippery that it took every ounce of strength in me to make it back up. There was no other spots to go down so, defeated, I made my way back up the steep trail. I exerted myself trying to go up that I had to lie down for a few minutes, fighting waves of nausea. During that episode I somehow managed to gash my hand pretty good. Wet, muddy, and bloodied, I sat my sorry in the car and drove to Plan B. West tip of Partridge Island There was no way that this rock trip was gonna be in vain, so I found myself taking the beach road behind the Ottawa House down West Bay Road. Last time I was here was in 2011 so my memory was a little bit hazy. I drove down the sandy road and after dodging or ramming through some major olympic sized pools of water, I managed to park in a safe area. Dirty rabbit! The tides were coming back slowly so I had lots of time to stroll on the beach. Everything was wet so I was curious to see if I could still spot trackways with all the glare. Turns out after a few minutes that I could, and I managed to spot some old tracks and some new ones. The cliffs are put at about Late Carboniferous, and are part of the Cumberland Group - Parrsboro Formation. The layers show an environment alternating between wet and arid, indicated by layers rich in river biota with surrounding vegetation, and the next indicating dryer conditions. Mud crack features The next few photos show a series of trackways and close ups of the ones I managed to spot. Multiple sets of tracks Tracks running horizontal Set of tracks, evenly spaced, with drag mark running along the center Close up of one of the indentation (from the previous photo) No clue at the present of what this is In a section that was protected from the elements, I took the time to take a closer look at some of the rippled surface and found some nice tiny tracks skipping on the surface. Each mes/pes are about ~1cm, running in several directions. Folding where two major faults intersect. The rock is strained and the strate disappears under a thick mix of glacial till, only to reappear a few hundred feet further West. Some trackways to be found, but mostly deformed and barely identifiable. This trip ended up being a very good one. I was able to get to see a few things I haven't seen before, and new data to incorporate in my ever evolving map of the area. Shows that its nice to prepare a litte in advance so that you're not left in a lurch. To finish a good trip in Parrsboro, I had to stop at my friends place, Doug and Jackie's of course! Stayed a while and talked rock. I managed to get out of town with two gorgeous pieces to add to my ever increasing mineral collection. Here's their site: http://www.amethystboutique.com/ On this note, I leave you to your musings. Cheers!
  10. Pros Stumped By 3 In. Fish-Gator

    This fossil was inherited so unfortunatly I don't know the background on it. The creature within is approximatly three inches in length. It appears to have skin like an alligator with the tail of a fish, most resembling a coelocanth tail. My interest in the fossil was renewed after reading about the discovery of tiktaalik. Unlike other supposedly pre-tetrapod fishes, there is no sign of any anterior fins (besides caudal) or appendages. This has given pause to some professional paleontologists who will not even hazzard a guess as to whether what I have is, as I believe, even a vertibrate. (I can't help but wonder if it may be some sort of transitional species, possibly even one with growth stages likened to a modern amphibian.) The previous owner of this fossil was a long-time resident of Corpus Christi, Texas. He also once lived near Fayetteville Arkansas. My suspicion is that the fossil is from the Nueces River Basin. GoodLuck.
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