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Found 7 results

  1. Coelophysis Teeth

    Hello all, I was browsing on our favorite auction site and I found a dealer who is selling a pair of Ceolophysis teeth for a rather cheap price, which sent off a warning flag in my mind. The dealer claims that these are from the Bull Canyon formation of New Mexico. Are these teeth real or are my suspicions correct?
  2. Tarbosaurus Tooth?

    Saw this tooth online recently, it already sold but it was listed as a Tarbosaurus Tooth but it reminds me more of a carcharodontosaurus tooth but then again I am unsure nor familiar with tarbosaurus teeth, what do you guys think? I have included all photos in the listing.
  3. Looks like we have a number of new members who are interested in Dinosaur teeth so I thought this topic might be good for them and serves as a reminder for more experienced collectors. Let me start off the discussion by saying that identifying isolated dinosaur teeth is a challenge even for more experience collectors, so its not a trivial task. There is no one cookbook that has all the answers, just a number of technical papers and articles that provide some information on different localities or species. Many of teeth that are sold online carry identifications that dealers have historically ascribed to them but in too many cases these names are not accurate or are out of date. This is very common not only from Morocco but also North America, Europe and Asia. New discoveries can change the playing field very quickly and sellers may not be not quick to keep abreast of these changes. So let me recommend the following 1) Purchase/Trade for quality teeth, the better the preservation the higher chance you have in getting an accurate ID. Teeth missing a significant portion of serrations on one or both edges, or very worn herbivore teeth can be very difficult to properly diagnose. Avoid buying: worn, cheap or incomplete teeth, save your money on better Q ones, exception being extremely rare teeth. 2) Do not trust any identification you see on a tooth. I don't care if its from a trusted dealer, a dealer you've done business with before, a friend, a member of this forum or any auction site. You need to be the expert. 3) Educated yourself as much as possible, read papers, books or informational topics on this forum. Ask questions and post your interest here on the forum B4 you buy or trade. 4) Photos: Other than the obvious ID's you cannot look at the front and back of a theropod tooth to determine what it is, especially Triassic and Jurassic material. At a minimum photos needed are from both sides, base and closeup of the serrations. If a someone is not interested in providing you these photos, move on and purchase/trade from someone else. 5) Additional characteristics may be required and that will be dependent on what you are buying. These include serration density at the midline of both carinae, width and length of the base and how far the mesial carina extends to the base. Again if someone is not willing to provide you this information just move on. 6) Provenance is very important in trying to get an accurate ID. Teeth from North American require the following information at a minimum: Geologic Formation, State/Province, and in the US needs to include County. The county provides you a check and balance to verify that the formation provided is good. Locality information that only includes a state or province like Alberta or Montana is not adequate to identify teeth. Getting complete information from other Geographic locations can be problematic so try to obtain as much as possible. 7) Avoid restored teeth unless it minimal or done on super rare teeth. Repairs are acceptable that includes crack fill or reattachment of broken teeth.. 8) More often that not you will not be able to identify down to a species name so its acceptable to have your tooth identified to a genus or family name. examples include: Tyrannosaurid indeterminate or Daspletosaurus sp. . Be patient someday your tooth may be fully described. Here are a couple of illustrations to help understand tooth terminology if asked to provide information. From " A proposed terminology of theropod teeth (Dinosauria, Saurischia) by Hendrickx, Mateus et al (2015) "
  4. Can across this one recently on our favorite auction site, a torvosaurus tooth from colorado. Though with no intention of buying especially at the high price tag it is at I have my suspicions, the seller claims it its 100% no repairs or restoration. Looking at the pictures I highly doubt it as it looks extremely repaired to me and some of it especially in the picture zooming into the tip reminds me of the little air holes found in fake cast trilobite. Idk how much is repaired or even if the whole specimen is fake, I'd be interested to hear what you guys think. Definitely a gigantic red flag to me.
  5. I noticed a number of online suppliers offering Troodon teeth that actually belong to the genus Pectinodon. Thought it would be a good discussion item for a focused post since they can get confusing with the various morphologies of Pectinodon teeth. I'll use publications to illustrate my points and reflect all Campanian & Maastrichtian age teeth of North America. (Edit) A new paper published late in 2017 has turned this taxon upside down. I will try to reflect those changes here but it should not change alter how they are identified against Pectinodon teeth. Specimens from Dinosaur Park Formation previously assigned to Troodon formosus have been reassigned to a new taxon Latenivenatrix mcmasterae and others to a resurrected Stenonychosaurus inequalis. Troodon formosus is now considered invalid. At the very end of this page I will show my understanding of ID's by Formation. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 2017, Vol. 54, No. 9 : pp. 919-935 Troodontids (Theropoda) from the Dinosaur Park Formation, Alberta, with a description of a unique new taxon: implications for deinonychosaur diversity in North America Aaron J. van der Reest, Philip J. Currie https://doi.org/10.1139/cjes-2017-0031 (Edit 2) Troodon formosus is still considered valid, comments from publication: "Given that the latter had already been synonymized into the senior T. formosus and remained unused for 30 years, Troodon formosus remains the proper name for this taxon, exclusive of L. mcmasterae, and we continue to use it here.: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-30085-6 Troodontids - Standard morphology These teeth are recurved, laterally compressed and oval in cross section. The Denticles are large and pointed upward on the distal (posterior) carina and minute or absent on the mesial (anterior) carina. Premaxillary teeth have strong denticles on both edges (Figure 8.3 E) Denticles per mm is typically around 4 Maximum length about 9.8mm Figure Examples : Troodontids: Large Morphology The tooth is large about 50% greater and others and can reach 14mm long, recurved and round in cross section. (See figure below 8.3 # 20-21) These have been collected from the North Slope of Alaska. Their is nothing unique to these teeth to describe a new taxon. I've have seen one of these jumbo teeth come from Alberta. Troodon Alaska.pdf Troodontids: Flat Morphology. Sankey paper "Diversity of latest cretaceous small theropods" describes a flat morphology tooth from the masstrichtian deposits, different that Zapsalis teeth that have fine serrations (See figure below 8.3 #1-8) Teeth are straight, with round cross sections. One side is flattened to concave and the other side is convex. Well developed longitudinal ridges are present. The mesial edge is smooth but can have minute denticles. The distal carina are large, larger than any other theropod. Looks like a Zapsalis tooth to me? Pectinodon bakkeri : Comparison - Troodon and Pectinodon Pectinodon - left image #5 mesial denticles usually absent #11 posterior denticles very large and often rounded much smaller average length of 2.6mm Troodonitid right image #12 posterior denticles point to the tip #13 anterior denticles exist, can be large or absent much larger average length 4 mm but can reach 9.8 Scale bar 1mm Pectinodon teeth can be put into four categories: premaxillary, maxillary, anterior & posterior dentary and all look different. In Figure 9.5 A & B are Premaxillary, C & D Maxillary, E & F Anterior Dentary and G & H Posterior Dentary Premaxillary teeth: long and slender, mesial carina strongly convex and distal is straight. Distal Denticles are large, pointed to the tip and become smaller toward the base. Maxillary teeth are compressed and bladelike. They look like small Dromaeosaur teeth. Anterior denticles are irregular in size and very small (5-6 denticles/mm). Posterior denticles are 3 per/mm. Anterior teeth are leaf shaped with no serrations on the mesial carina. Denticles on the distal edge are 1.6/mm. Denticles are irregular in size. Please note scale bar at 5mm References used: 1) Vertebrate Microfossil Assemblages by Sankey and Baszio 2) Dinosaur Systematics by Ken Carpenter and P. Currie North American Troodontids: My best call I"m sure these will be updated with new research and discoveries. Belly River Group (Alberta) : Latenivenatrix mcmasterae and Stenonychosaurus inequalis (one cannot distinguish between isolated teeth of these two species ID: should be Troodontid indet.) Horseshoe Canyon Formation (Alberta) : Albertavenator curriei (multiple species may exist) Kaiparowits Formation (Utah) : Talos sampsoni Judith River Formation (Montana) : Troodon formosus Two Medicine Formation (Montana) : TMF Troodontid Hell Creek & Lance Formation (Montana, Wyoming, South & North Dakota) : cf Troodon formosus All others (Saskatchewan, Alaska, Colorado etc) : cf Troodon formosus Multiple Troodontids might exist in these other fauna similar to the Belly Group. Since skeletal remains are super rare we may never know if this is true. Identification to a family level "Troodontid indet." may be more appropriate but you can decide that.
  6. Theropod teeth from Uzbekistan typically are not seen for sale other than those from Tyrannosaurs. Opportunities always make themselves available so I decided to put a quick post out on those that have had some scientific research. I also think it's cool to see some of these teeth. We are looking at teeth from the Bissekty Formation, Touronian in age from the Kyzylkum Desert from the following two locations Dzharakuduk and Uchkuduk. There are younger and older deposits in this Desert but all of the teeth sold appear to be coming from those two localities. Changes to what is presented here most certainty will occur with continued research, understanding and new discoveries. Bissekty Tyrannosaurid: Tyrannosaurid indet. (in 2016 this was described as Timurlengia euotica) The Tyrannosaur from this locality has yet to be described. Once thought to be Alectrosaurus it is now viewed as a different Tyrannosaur. The Premaxillary teeth may or may not be serrated. They are your typically D shaped tooth. (17.5-27.5 denticles per 5mm) The scale bar represents 1mm. The Maxillary and Dentary teeth are typically very compressed (flattened) and recurved. Both carinae are serrated and have the same size denticles. Crowns can be quite different, some long and blade like others short and more stout. (12-22 denticles per 5mm on distal carina) The scale bar represents 1mm Troodontid: Urbacondon sp. There are three taxa of troodontid dinosaurs recognized from the Kyzylkum Desert. Urbacondon itemirensis from the Cenomanian for the Dharakuduk Fm, an Indeterminate Troodontid from the Khodzhakul Formation and Urbacondon sp from the Bissekty Formation. The teeth are not common and only four teeth have been identified. A premaxillary tooth, anterior dentary tooth and a pair of maxillary or dentary teeth. Quite distinctive easy to identify. Therizinosauroid indet Therizinosaurs are among the most common theropod in terms of skeletal remains found. At least two undescribed taxa are present in the Bissekty Formation. Their teeth are small but easily identifiable. They are found with either conical and lanceolate crowns. The scale bar represents 1mm. Dromaeosaurid: Itemirus medullaris Dromaeosaurid remains are among the least common theropod found in this region. Teeth however are numerous. Like all Dromaeosaurid teeth there is a distinct difference between the size and density of serrations along the mesial and distal carinae. The distal denticles are always much larger. Anterior teeth have the medial carina twist. (3-6 denticles per 1mm on distal carina) If the serrations are identical it most likely is a Tyrannosaur or another Indeterminate Theropod. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667114001189?via%3Dihub
  7. A few years ago most of the smaller theropod teeth from the Hell Creek/Lance Formations were identified based on teeth from the Campanian assemblages of North America. Over the past couple of years new discoveries have shed new light on the theropods of the end of the cretaceous and new species have been described. I have addressed these on separate topics but decided to put all of these together to get a better view of the current picture of the upper Hell Creek and Lance formations. If you see any omissions or errors feel free to let me know. Tyrannosaurs: There are two Tyrannosaurs described Tyrannosaurus rex and Nanotyrannus lancensis Teeth of these two tyrannosaurus can be distinguished between one another however there may be some positional teeth that can be difficult and mimic one another. Denticles on both on both anterior and posterior carinae can be identical in size and shape however the carinae on Rex teeth are more robust. Serration count from my examination is not important on smaller teeth. Nanotyrannus teeth typically do not exceed 2 1/2". The best way to distinguish these teeth is to look at how compressed they are and the cross section at the base of the tooth. Rex dentary teeth are oval at the base and maxillary teeth are a bit more compressed. Some maxillary teeth can appear to look like Nano so other features need to be examined like the robustness of the tip and carinae. Nanotyrannus teeth are unique as tyrannosaurd go, they are very compressed across the entire crown and their cross section at the base is rectangular. Basically Rex teeth are fat and Nano are flat. Here are examples of the cross sections at the base of a couple of Rex teeth under 1 1/2" and adult Nano's Rex (teeth are oval but can vary depending on position.) (Maxillary teeth are more rectangular) This figure represents tyrannosaurid teeth from the Judith River but is applicable to T-rex and shows the cross sectional shape at the base for different positions. Morphometry of the teeth of western North American tyrannosaurids and its applicability to quantitative classification Article (PDF Available) in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 50(4):757–776 · April 2005  Nano (teeth are rectangular) Maxillary T Rex teeth can also take this shape so one needs to consider other features. Looking at compression Rex teeth are fat with robust tips Nano teeth are flatish Aubysodon molnari is a tooth taxon known from unserrated Pre-maxillary teeth. This taxon is a "nomen dubium" dinosaur and premaxillary teeth being sold belong to one of the other two Tyrannosaurs in these assemblages. They should be labeled as "Tyrannosaurid indet" because its impossible to differentiate between species. Albertosaurus sp.is not present in these assemblages Dromaeosaurids: There are only two described Acheroraptor temertyorum and Dakotaraptor steini and Zapsalis sp. is also present. Saurornitholestes and Dromaeosaurs species are not present. Acheroraptor temertyorum Identification: Like all Dromaeosaurid teeth the denticles are key and different between those on the anterior and posterior carinae. You should easily be able to see that the posterior ones are much larger. If the denticles are identical its probably a juvenile Nanotyrannus tooth. Secondly there are apicobasal ridges on the crown which are diagnostic to this species. There can be several on either side and fewer on posterior located teeth. The teeth are recurved and typically under 1/2" (13mm) long. Dakotaraptor steini Identification: Zapsalis sp. (UPDATE) Identification: Similar to Z. abradens from the Judith River Formation. Very compresses tooth with rounded serrations on the distal side and a smooth mesial edge. One flat tooth surface with longitudinal ridges Update: This form of tooth has been identified as a premaxillary tooth on Saurornitholestes in Alberta. So these teeth should most likely be assigned to Archoraptor but will need new discoveries to confirm it. Update: The unserrated form of this tooth (paronychodon morph) may also be a premaxillary tooth of a Dromaeosaurid or Troodontid. New discoveries are needed to properly assign it. Troodontids: There are at least two present cf Troodon formosus and Pectinodon bakkeri. but only one described Pectinodon bakkeri. cf T. formosus is an easily recognizable tooth. Denticles strongly hooked and turned toward the tip Pectinodon bakkeri signicantly smaller 6mm or less than Troodon teeth. Comb like denticles on posterior carina, lacking on the anterior side.. Positionally these teeth have different morphologies can been see in the photo. Reference from : Vertebrate Microfossil Assemblages by Sankey and Baszio Other Teeth: Paronychodon lacustris type teeth are flat on one side and usually bear three or more longitudinal ridges. The other side is convex and can be smooth or longitudinal ridges can be present as well. Richardoestesia gilmorei. these teeth are quite varied in shape and size and are also common. Some are straight and others are slightly recurved. Denticles are often limited to the posterior carina and individual denticles are minute. If the denticles are present on both carinae they are identical in size. The serrations should look like these (scale .2mm) Richardoestesia isoceles. Typically are very compressed, elongated and form an isosceles triangle. Fine serrations can be present This species along with the Paronychodon is currently under study and will most likely be described to a new taxon which may not be dinosaurian . Albertonykus sp. is known from bones. Its teeth are very small and pointed. Photo of tooth is from the smaller Mongolian species Mononychus olecranus Morph types isolated small theropod teeth are abundant in these assemblages. Morph types exist and determining the taxonomic affinities of these teeth is problematic. So be prepared to identify these teeth as Theropod indet. Note A lot of what I've described here requires a detailed examination of the serrations. The crisper they are on your tooth the better the opportunity you will have to identify them. having some magnification capability helps Bird: Avisaurus archibaldi This tooth is typically sold and known as A. archibaldi. Unfortunately the holotype is known only from one bone a diagnostic tarsometatarsus and NO other skeletal material has been published. So we really do not know if this morphology of tooth belong to this enantiornithine bird. Its probably best ID as Avisaurid indet.
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