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Found 165 results

  1. Hell Creek Teeth ID

    Hi All, I wondered if you could help with the ID of two small teeth I found in the Hell Creek formation in SE Montana (in a microsite). The first is what looks like a Thescelosaurus tooth, but I think looking at it again it might be Ankylosaurus magniventris (it's small at 0.25"). The second is a small Theropod tooth (0.55") is a strange looking tooth which I can't place. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I've taken some photos in hand and then a few under the microscope. Thanks in advance for any help.
  2. Afrovenator tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Afrovenator tooth Tiourarén Formation
  3. Theropod tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Theropod tooth Lourinhã formation
  4. Neovenator tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Neovenator tooth Wessex Formation
  5. Aguja tyrannosaurid tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Aguja tyrannosaurid aguja formation
  6. Baryonyx tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Baryonyx tooth Wessex Formation
  7. Carnivorous theropod claw

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but this is definitely not the end of a digit from a large carnivorous theropod. The only potentials from the Morrison formation where it was found, would be different species of ceratasaurs, allosaurs, and torvosaurus, right? and they, along with most carnivorous theropods have claws at the end of every digit, including the little foot&heel stubbies, don't they? wouldnt this have to be from something without claws? Or at least no claw on this?
  8. Theropod imprint 200myo Private Connecticut river valley real or fake
  9. Theropod bone?

    Hi, I am looking at this bone from the kem kem and i was wondering how do you tell the difference between a theropod bone and a crocodilian bone?. The bone is hollow but only a bit (the hollow part still has matrix in it), does the morphology of this bone suggest theropod? Thanks.
  10. Daspletosaurus toe?

    Listed as a toe end metatarsal from Two Medicine formation, NW Montana. Would be this be Daspletosaurus hornei / Gorgosaurus sp. or indeed is 100% Daspletosaurus?
  11. Theropod indet. ?

    This is an Afrovenator tooth from Marraba, Niger (Tiouraren Formation). The fossil is in rough shape, but rare. I’m still working developing an eye for noting the differences, but still difficult for me..Having trouble determining if it is indeed Afrovenator, Carcharodontosaurus sp. , or undescribed theropod. I tried comparing different teeth, but still have issues. Any opinion on this appreciated.
  12. Theropod tooth from France

    Any ideas what this might be or is it too small to id? Also don't have denticle count but I don't think that would even help as it is such a small tooth. If this is the case then I guess it's another tooth that is a Theropod indet….Anyone familiar with teeth from France? 9mm in size Chevres-Richemont Quarry Chevres-de-Cognac, Charente, South West France
  13. Not much has been published focusing on theropods from New Jersey. Nice to see a new paper that looks at the assemblage at the Ellisdale site of New Jersey. The distinctive theropod assemblage of the Ellisdale site of New Jersey and its implications for North American dinosaur ecology and evolution during the Cretaceous Chase D. Brownstein https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/distinctive-theropod-assemblage-of-the-ellisdale-site-of-new-jersey-and-its-implications-for-north-american-dinosaur-ecology-and-evolution-during-the-cretaceous/96A7436DCD5866236C472749729F88B6 cf Dryptosaurus Dromaeosaurid Indeterminate
  14. Worn Down Theropod Tooth

    A couple of years ago my grandmother purchased me this theropod tooth offline for a cheap price. The only locality given was Hell Creek, Montana. I took it to my local geology museum and one of the paleontologists who took pictures of it for me told me that the serrations were nearly identical, but he said that it is a dromaeosaurid tooth in his opinion. I think it could be either nanotyrannus, dromaeosaurid or maybe just a theropod indeterminate. It is very worn down. What do you guys think?
  15. Abelisaurid Premax Tooth

    A premaxillary tooth of an Abelisaurid.
  16. Juvenile Baryonyx fossil footcast. Only 8cm long. 135 mya. Bexhill. Sussex Add more later.
  17. Abelisauroid Vertebra

    A distal caudal vertebra of a theropod dinosaur. This vertebra is quite similar to Masiakasaurus from Madagaskar. So I've labeled this as cf. Abelisauroidea. There have been some reports that there are Noasaurids in the Kem Kem beds, so that might be a more specific possible identification. However at the moment just not enough is known about the Kem Kem fauna.
  18. Tyrannosaurus?

    Ok, here's 2 pieces. I think it's clear which are which, but just to be clear, of these first 4 pics, the 2nd picture for some weird reason, is of the 2nd bone, and the other 3 are of the 1st, and the rest of its pics will have to follow in additional posts. Of course I'm still no expert, but as some of you will know Ive been doing QUITE a bit of research on trex bones recently, and I have to say that from what I can see, to ME, who again, is no expert, they look like they fit, and I haven't seen anything that discounts that. Both from hell creek. <<As always, I very much want to hear what everyone has to say about it.....ESPECIALLY if u agree, but even if you don't too, of course:) A lot of what Iv learned recently and been pointed in the right directions to learn, is from you guys giving me your thoughts and ideas! If I notice something to debate, or devils advocate in people's ideas, its cause I'm taking it seriously. I worry I might sometimes come off as being stubborn and just disregarding things of people who's opinion is just not what I am wanting to hear.
  19. Hi all just wondering what the chances are of ever being able to own a carnotaurus tooth. it’s probably number one or two on my want list and I know they can’t be imported from Argentina but wondering how many people own them ( were they common when they were obtainable) and if you can see a way in the future if Argentina allowing these fossils to be sold once more. any help or info would be appreciated! Paul
  20. Vertabra

    Searching through some matrix I found this partial vertebra. Wish it was a bit more complete but maybe next one. This was found in marine sediment from near Richmond in Central Queensland Australia. It is from the Toolebuc formation witch is Cretaceous Albian about 98 - 100 million years old The longest length dimension is 6.5 millimetres so the animal it comes from must have been huge Also interested in where on spine this would have been situated if sufficient information can be gleaned for this partial. Thanks in advance for all input. Mike
  21. Always like to see discoveries of dinosaur material from the east coast especially from North Carolina. Here, the first definitive occurrence of a dromaeosaurid from the Tar Heel Formation is reported on the basis of a tooth from a fairly large member of that group. The tooth described in the paper is intermediate in size between those of smaller dromaeosaurids like Saurornitholestes and gigantic forms like Dakotaraptor. https://www.paleowire.com/just-out-a-giant-dromaeosaurid-from-north-carolina-cretaceous-research/ Paywalled paper https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667118301253
  22. Hello forum, new member here! I have been lurking for a while and concluded that some of my Hell creek fossils are probably mislabeled. Bought them back in 2005-09 from a Danish collector. The three small theropod teeth were labled as follows: smallest one, at 11 mm long and 6mm at the base; Saurornitholestes. (Hell creek, montana) Second largest at 15 mm long by 8mm; Dromaeosaurus.(Hell Creek, Montana) Third one is labeled as Nanotyranus, but with a length of 15 mm and a 9mm base, it seems quite small. ( Hell Creek, Roundup, Montana) The middle tooth has faint ridges, the cam is not picking up, running from top to bottom (Acheroraptor?) Would love to hear your opinions on what these could be!
  23. Triassic Vert (Coelophysis?)

    Hello all, I just picked up this pretty vert and am not quite sure about the ID. The seller advertised it as Coelophysis, but it doesn't seem to be a match. It's from Bull Canyon formation, Quay County, New Mexico (Upper Triassic). It measures 2 1/2". The seller provided good pictures, so I've attached some of those. I can provide more and even take some of my own if needed! Thanks, and hopefully we can figure out an ID on this one!
  24. Organizing Collection/ ID Help

    Organizing my collection has been the tedious, but also a really fun process. I’ll probably continually posting here for assistance. When I’m feeling a little more confident about my ID’s, I’ll post it in the members collection section to share. I still have some fossils to prep, piece together, display, label, etc. and really fortunate that I have all of you helping constantly; it really speeds up the process. In another year’s time, I’ll be much more educated/ well rounded Some of my fossils are rookie purchases, so I’m just trying to make the best of it. The issue is , I think they’re pretty cool, but not sure if they are worth displaying given that they are bone fragments. I was thinking maybe in a riker...also the issue of labeling...Below are three separate purchases. Group 1: The seller sold these in fragments. Several of these pieces I glued back together neatly with Paleo bond. The seller must’ve used some kind of thick glue originally because there are some marks, but it’s no big deal... anyway these were advertised as Albertosaurus bones... when I asked the seller why he labeled it as such, he said because it’s very probable? I asked him for a coa, and when I received it, it only said Tyannosaur bones... so I’m going to leave it at that...because it’s indeterminable. Even back then I knew Coa’s were pointless, but I always like asking for one, because I feel like it could possibly put a little pressure on the seller to be a somewhat more honest like it did in this case...however in most cases sellers don’t care: Tyrannosaur bone fragments: Judith River Formation, Northern Montana The other small miscellaneous pieces I don’t think can be glued back...no fit or match, just associated bones...What would you label the fossil as, and are they worth displaying?
  25. Theropod Teeth and Claw Segment

    Forgive me, for I am new here. So I purchased these two teeth and a (ID’d as) crocodile claw segment at my local gem and mineral show for $10 each. These were identified by the director of my local geology museum as potentially being from the Lance Creek formation in Wyoming, but he said that I may need to wait for another paleontologist who works at Hell Creek to come back and take a closer look at the serrations. The second tooth, however, has the color for a Kem Kem specimen due to its reddish-brown color. The director was nice enough to take photos of them. I have more pictures of the teeth and claw segment that I’ll be uploading in the comments.
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