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Found 311 results

  1. Seems the questions raised around that exciting news of an avian dinosaur preserved in Burmese amber were right after all. The original paper has been retracted by its authors, after the discovery of another fossil closely resembling the previously discovered skull portion of Oculudentavis was classified as a species of lizard, rather than an avian dinosaur. Disappointing for dinosaur fans, but it doesn't change the fact that any Late Cretaceous vertebrate preserved in this way is still an exceptional find. Read more: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2553-9
  2. Indeterminate Kem Kem Theropod Tooth

    It's been a little while since I've popped in to the fossil world properly, but I finally came across another unusual little theropod tooth from the riddle that is the Kem Kem, and just had to pick it up. The overall size and a bit of chunkiness going on here discounts the theorised dromaeosaurid(s) from the locality, and the recurved distal edge doesn't scream abelisaurid. Nothing about it particularly says carcharodontosaurid either, and I can't find a clean match with the morphologies of @Troodon's id guide, though 'morph type 3' is possibly the closest.....so anyone got any thoughts? There's a very strong displacement of the distal carina and the mesial carina extends approx. ⅔ down the mesial face of the tooth. The cross section is oval in shape, with no "pinching" at the base. There are also no interdental sulci or apparent enamel wrinkling (thought the enamel is worn, so it's a little hard to tell). Measurements: CH: 21mm CBL: 8mm CBW: 5mm Serration count (midline): Mesial: 5/1mm Distal: 3/1mm Labial face (?) Lingual face (?) Mesial face Distal face Cross section (anterior of the tooth is oriented upwards) Quick scale reference Denticles (distal carina) Denticles *worn* (mesial carina) Thanks in advance, peeps!
  3. ?Abelisaurid bones

    I decided to sort through some of the Kem Kem bones I got at the Tucson show, and I think I found several Abelisaurid bones. Please let me know if I got it right (Ifezouane formation, Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian) Here is what I think is a distal tibia Here are some Abelisaurid tibias: A - Quilmesaurus, G - Rajasaurus, I - Pycnonemosaurus @LordTrilobite @Troodon
  4. Help!

    Hi, I’m thinking of getting these teeth and wondering if anyone can help on the ID, there both from the Lourinhä Formation, Portugal. Sorry I can’t get the sellers website out at the bottom. Thank you!
  5. Hi all, I could not resist and purchased this tooth knowing it would be a tough call to make. It was found in the Hell Creek Fm. The big problem is the worn down mesial carina, there are however some remnant denticles I could measure, but not midline – more posterior. Taking them into consideration the tooth has distal 4.5 denticles per mm and mesial 6 per mm. The other measurements are: CH 1.47 cm / CBL 0.74 cm / CBW 0.39 cm. Based on this and the oval base I am leaning towards Dakotaraptor but might as well be a specific T-Rex tooth position.? I really need someone more experienced to take a look please. Any help is highly appreciated.
  6. What bone?

    What bone is this? Thanks for the help
  7. Veins?

    Are these vein imprints?
  8. Theropod tooth from Judith River Fm.

    Hello everybody So I got this small tooth from Hill County, Montana, Judith River Formation, labeled as a Theropod indet. tooth. Length is just around 0.5 inches. CM as seen in the pictures. Any hope for an ID beyond Theropod indet? Thx!
  9. Possible theropod bone

    Hi everyone, this is a dinosaur bone I’ve been prepping, it was found on the lance fm in WY, it seems hollow and I was wondering if you could tell me if it’s a T-rex bone or a different theropod species, 8 1/4 by 3 1/2 TIA.
  10. Nanotyrannus?

    I'd quite like to add a new theropod tooth to my collection. I saw these three for sale, just wondering if they are Nano/theropod as described and not, say, raptor teeth. Thanks Pictures 1 - 3 is 0.56 inch. This has a more oval base, does this mean it's not nano? Because aren't there teeth more rectangular with an indented middle? Pictures 4 and 5 is 0.47 inch -- No pictures of base for this one. Pictures 6 and 7 is 1.06 inch long, but has a repaired tip and is in matrix. Any help will be great. If they check out, I will select one of these. If not, I'll have a browse for some others.
  11. Big brook finds again!

    Hello again. Ive been to big brook a couple times and have some more interesting pieces! So here we have two raptor teeth, a dwarf mammoth tusk and a dire wolf tooth...just kidding but hoping there as unique as im saying. The "theropod" teeth may just be worn shark teeth or enchodus. And the other two modern? So 4 things in total though. Thanks anyone.
  12. https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlaa054/5861188?redirectedFrom=fulltext
  13. Hello Fossil Friends, Saw this in the news today so thought I’d share: ******************** World's smallest dinosaur egg fossil discovered in Japan Source Link A team of researchers said Tuesday it has discovered the world's smallest dinosaur egg fossil, measuring about 4.5 centimeters by 2 cm, in western Japan. The fossil of the egg, estimated to have weighed only about 10 grams more than 100 million years ago, was found in a stratum dating back to the Early Cretaceous period in Tamba, Hyogo Prefecture, according to the team. Supplied photo shows the world's smallest dinosaur egg fossil found in Tamba, Hyogo Prefecture, western Japan. (Photo courtesy of the University of Tsukuba and the Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo)(Kyodo) The researchers at the University of Tsukuba and the Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo, among others, who have analyzed the fossil, said it likely belonged to a non-avian small theropod. Skeletal remains of small dinosaurs are far less common than those of large dinosaurs, such as the Tyrannosaurus, which was also a theropod, and Kohei Tanaka of the University of Tsukuba, a member of the team, said he hopes the discovery will "help shed light on how small dinosaurs reproduced and nested." The team surveyed the stratum, which dates back 110 million years, between 2015 and 2019 and found four fossil eggs and over 1,300 scattered eggshell fragments. It has confirmed the findings, including the newly discovered one, which has been named Himeoolithus murakamii, can be categorized into four different types. The team said the discovery suggests that various small dinosaurs were nesting together in the area, known as one of the world's richest Lower Cretaceous fossil egg sites. Fossilized dinosaur eggs have been found elsewhere, including Spain and Mongolia, but many of them are 5 to 7 cm in length and weigh about 30 g. ******************** Thanks, Robert
  14. Hello Fossil Friends, You might have already known or been aware, but I came across this in the news today and thought I’d share it with you. I note that these fossils are not a recent discovery—most just had not been scientifically described, hence the recent publication. ******************** Gigantic Australian carnivorous dinosaurs discovered and studied using footprints North America had the T. rex, South America had the Giganotosaurus and Africa the Spinosaurus—now evidence shows Australia had gigantic predatory dinosaurs. The discovery came in University of Queensland research, led by paleontologist Dr. Anthony Romilio, which analyzed southern Queensland dinosaur footprint fossils dated to the latter part of the Jurassic Period, between 165 and 151 million-years-ago. "I've always wondered, where were Australia's big carnivorous dinosaurs?" Dr. Romilio said. "But I think we've found them, right here in Queensland. The specimens of these gigantic dinosaurs were not fossilized bones, which are the sorts of things that are typically housed at museums. Rather, we looked at footprints, which—in Australia—are much more abundant." He explains, "These tracks were made by dinosaurs walking through the swamp-forests that once occupied much of the landscape of what is now southern Queensland." Most of the tracks used in the study belong to theropods, the same group of dinosaurs that includes Australovenator, Velociraptor, and their modern-day descendants, birds. Dr. Romilio said these were clearly not bird tracks. "Most of these footprints are around 50 to 60 centimeters in length, with some of the really huge tracks measuring nearly 80 centimeters," he said. "We estimate these tracks were made by large-bodied carnivorous dinosaurs, some of which were up to three meters high at the hips and probably around 10 meters long. To put that into perspective, T. rex got to about 3.25 meters at the hips and attained lengths of 12 to 13 meters long, but it didn't appear until 90 million years after our Queensland giants." He says, "The Queensland tracks were probably made by giant carnosaurs—the group that includes the Allosaurus. At the time, these were probably some of the largest predatory dinosaurs on the planet." Despite the study providing important new insights into Australia's natural heritage, the fossils are not a recent discovery. "The tracks have been known for more than half a century," Dr. Romilio said. "They were discovered in the ceilings of underground coal mines from Rosewood near Ipswich, and Oakey just north of Toowoomba, back in the 1950s and 1960s." Most, he said, hadn't been scientifically described, and were left for decades in museum drawers waiting to be re-discovered. "Finding these fossils has been our way of tracking down the creatures from Australia's Jurassic Park." Source: Gigantic Australian carnivorous dinosaurs discovered and studied using footprints ******************** Below are a few links to related news articles: Tracking Gigantic Carnivorous Dinosaurs From Australia’s Jurassic Park Footprints reveal giant carnivorous dinosaurs the length of a bus wandered Australia And, if you’re interested in reading the research paper, which has been published in Historical Biology, the information is as follows: Anthony Romilio et al. Footprints of large theropod dinosaurs in the Middle–Upper Jurassic (lower Callovian–lower Tithonian) Walloon Coal Measures of southern Queensland, Australia., Historical Biology (2020). DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2020.1772252 Thanks, Robert
  15. Dental Anatomy of Sinraptor dongi

    Another excellent publication on the characteristics of theropod teeth by C. Hendrickx et al. This one describes the dental anatomy the Jurassic Allosaurid Sinraptor dongi https://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/full/10.1139/cjes-2019-0231
  16. Interesting discovery of a new theropod in South America: Overoraptor Chimentoi. Thought to be closely related to 'Rahonavis' from Madagascar; “...........would indicate that Overoraptor chimentoi and Rahonavis could form a new group of paravian runners, which would be closer to the birds than known raptor families.” http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/overoraptor-chimentoi-08517.html
  17. Please help me identify tooth #2

    Hi! Here is the second tooth I recently acquired. The information he had was It Was from the oldman formation in the red river valley Alberta. It is 3.5 cm on the long side with 3 serrations per mm.
  18. Hi everyone, Does anyone know where I might buy unprocessed fossil matrix containing Theropod teeth?
  19. NJ Cretaceous Theropod tooth - Dromaeosaurus?

    Hi everyone, I found this theropod tooth in the NJ Late Cretaceous and am wondering about its identity. It resembles some of the dromaeosaur teeth I see online. I can do a serration count if necessary. The distal serrations are much larger than the mesial ones. It is slightly over 3/8” tall, and slightly over 7/16” in slant height. I can try and get some better pictures if necessary (it’s rather hard to photograph it). Any thoughts are appreciated! @Troodon @non-remanié
  20. Flat elongated Kem Kem bone ID

    I've got this long flat bone from the Kem Kem with a wide base, it was presumably attached to a larger bone. It also seems like it's missing the tip. I thought it might be a small spinosaurid neural spine but it has a weird lump of bone on one side so it seems like it is something else. Is this lump a muscle scar? Or a healed wound? And could this bone be an odd spinosaurid neural spine or is it something entirely else?
  21. Moroccan theropod teeth

    Hello together, I think I may have asked about these before, posted together with other teeth. They were sold together with other fossils supposedly from kem kem, saying "teeth from Abelisaur/Dromaeosaur" which is not very helpful. Can any of you tell me more about them? Sorry if already got an answer for these, could not find one. Only the darkest one shows much of the serration, the sandy part may be repaired? @Troodon, @LordTrilobite, your expertise would be most welcome. @Abstraktum Thanks and greetings, J
  22. Vertebrae ID (Kem-Kem)

    Hi! I recently got 4 vertebras from Morocco (Kem-Kem beds). They told me that one of them (the smallest one, nº4) is a theropod vertebra but I don't know what kind of theropod it comes from (or even if it is possible to know). And I'm completely lost with the other 3 (number 1 - 3), I don't know if they are Spinosaurus, crocodile or even a mosasaur... Can anyone help me? Thanks in advance!
  23. Help Identifying Hell Creek Bones

    I've just cleaned up a big batch of Hell Creek bones and I'm struggling to ID a few of them. I have some ideas as to a few, but others I'm clueless (and I'm sure some won't be able to be ID'd beyond indeterminate dino/reptile bone). These four are all pretty big. The largest, second from the right, is just over 6.5 inches. I've attached a picture of that one before I repaired it as it has very thick walls. That bone and second from the left are very heavy for their size, so I'm assuming they're theropod (probably leg bones). I haven't a clue with the other two, but they're an odd shape.
  24. Hello, two more verts I'd quite like to add to my (slowly) growing vert collection. First is a a Kem Kem Theropod Caudal Vert mentioned as possibly Carcharodontosaurus which measures 7 cm x 7.5 cm x 7cm. Many thanks again.
  25. Hello, I'm new on this forum and I've got a fossil of which I don't know what it is so I thought I'd ask. It's from the Kem Kem. I don't know which formation but it comes from Taouz. Only one side has been preparated. I haven't preparated the other side because it's a pretty thin bone and I'm afraid it might break. It seems like it has broken and been repaired before. Also, there's an Onchopristis tooth attached to it. I think it might be a skull fragment because of it's odd shape. Specifically I think it might be some theropod's left postorbital of which only the inside has been preparated. But there aren't a lot of Kem Kem skulls to compare it to. So it might be something entirely else. Any ideas as to what it could be would be highly appreciated. Top view Front view
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