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Found 21 results

  1. small dromaeosaurid,oldie but goodie

    xinxuxiaolsmallestdinosazhaoianusmicrorapnaturezhonghetopost200010b4c14c3.pdf the other paper on this species(Hwang/Norell) is ,naturally,in Fruitbat's Library,possibly in some others as well salient points(or:"things you might want to remember about this article")(apart from osteological details): edit,hours later:possible repost,because I just noticed this one in Fruitbat's Library. Joe,i feel i owe you an apology. note Maniraptora (GAUTHIER): I posted the Gauthier,a very influential cladistic paper,a while back Note 2: "Archaeoraptor" turned out to be forged
  2. Chris Packham presents!

    Don't forget to watch!It starts just when the Attenborough doc on the Lyme Regis ichthyosaur ends on Beeb one.Apologies if repost
  3. IOW UK dino

    Kats Looking forward to the dental microwear analysis already
  4. troodontology

    sizetheropusapalaiosOntootroodontologgigant_the_Occurrence_of_Exceptionally_Large.pdf
  5. do not try to pronounce this at home

    deklnqwebl_2012.pdf Outtake:
  6. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since December 15, 2017. Order Saurischia Suborder Theropoda General Theropoda General Theropoda - Africa/Middle East Fanti, F. and F. Therrien (2007). Theropod tooth assemblages from the Late Cretaceous Maevarano Formation and the possible presence of dromaeosaurids in Madagascar. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(1). Fanti, F., et al. (2014). Integrating palaeoecology and morphology in theropod diversity estimation: A case from the Aptian-Albian of Tunisia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 410. Galton, P.M. and R.E. Molnar (2012). An unusually large theropod dinosaur tooth from the Kirkwood Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of South Africa. N.Jb.Geol.Palaont.Abh., 263/1. Knoll, F. and J.I. Ruiz-Omenaca (2009). Theropod teeth from the basalmost Cretaceous of Anoual (Morocco) and their palaeobiogeographical significance. Geol.Mag., 146(4). Maganuco, S., A. Cau and G. Pasini (2005). First description of theropod remains from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Madagascar. Atti Soc.it.Sci.nat. Museo civ.Stor.nat. Milano, 146(II). Mateer, N.J. (1987). A New Report of a Theropod Dinosaur from South Africa. Palaeontology, Vol.30, Part 1. Niedźwiedzki, G. and G. Gierliński (2002). Isolated theropod teeth from the Cretaceous strata of Khouribga, Morocco. Geological Quarterly, 46(1). Novas, F.E., F. Dalla Vecchia and D.F. Pais (2005). Theropod pedal unguals from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Morocco, Africa. Rev.Mus. Argentino Cienc.Nat., n.s., 7(2). Rauhut, O.W.M. (2011). Theropod Dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Tendaguru (Tanzania). Palaeontology, Special Papers in Palaeontology, 86. Ray, S. and A. Chinsamy (2002). A theropod tooth from the Late Triassic of southern Africa. J.Biosci., 27. Richter, U., A. Mudroch and L.G. Buckley (2012). Isolated theropod teeth from the Kem Kem Beds (Early Cenomanian) near Taouz, Morocco. Palaontol.Z., 87(2). (Author's personal copy) Sampson, S.D., et al. (1998). Predatory Dinosaur Remains from Madagascar: Implications for the Cretaceous Biogeography of Gondwana. Science, Vol.280. Serrano-Martinez, A., et al. (2016). Isolated theropod teeth from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the early dental evolution of Spinosauridae. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(2). Sereno, P.C., et al. (1996). Predatory Dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous Faunal Differentiation. Science, Vol.272. General Theropoda - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Averianov, A.O. (2007). Theropod dinosaurs from Late Cretaceous deposits in the northeastern Aral Sea region, Kazakhstan. Cretaceous Research, 28. Han, F., et al. (2011). Theropod Teeth from the Middle-Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of Northwest Xinjiang, China. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 31(1). Mo, J.-Y. and X. Xu (2012). Large theropod teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of Jiangxi, southern China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 53(1). Obsorn, H.F. (1924). Three New Theropoda, Protoceratops Zone, Central Mongolia. American Museum Novitates, Number 144. Stilwell, J.D., et al. (2006). Dinosaur sanctuary on the Chatham Islands, Southwest Pacific: First record of theropods from the K-T boundary, Takatika Grit. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 230. General Theropoda - Australia/New Zealand Benson, R.B.J., et al. (2012). Theropod Fauna from Southern Australia Indicates High Polar Diversity and Climate-Driven Dinosaur Provinciality. PLoS ONE, 7(5). Long, J.A. (1995). A theropod dinosaur bone from the Late Cretaceous Molecap Greensand, Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 17. Long, J.A. and A.R.I. Cruickshank (1996). First record of an Early Cretaceous theropod dinosaur bone from Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 18. Thulborn, T. (1998). Australia's Earliest Theropods: Footprint Evidence in the Ipswich Coal Measures (Upper Triassic) of Queensland. GAIA, Number 15. General Theropoda - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Averianov, A.O. and A.A. Yarkov (2004). Carnivorous Dinosaurs (Saurischia, Theropoda) from the Maastrichtian of the Volga-Don Interfluve, Russia. Paleontological Journal, Vol.38, Number 1. Delsate, D. and M.D. Ezcurra (2014). The first Early Jurassic (late Hettangian) theropod dinosaur remains from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Geologica Belgica, 17/2. Ezcuerra, R., et al. (2007). Were non-avian theropod dinosaurs able to swim? Supportive evidence from an Early Cretaceous trackway, Cameros Basin (La Rioja, Spain). Geology, Vol.35, Number 6. Gerke, O. and O. Wings (2016). Multivariate and Cladistic Analysis of Isolated Teeth Reveal Sympatry of Theropod Dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany. PLoS ONE, 11(7). (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Knoll, F., E. Buffetaut and M. Bulow (1999). A theropod braincase from the Jurassic of the Vaches Noires cliffs (Normandy, France): osteology and palaeoneurology. Bull.Soc.geol. France, Vol.170, Number 1. Lindgren, J., et al. (2008). Theropod dinosaur teeth from the lowermost Cretaceous Rabekke Formation on Bornholm, Denmark. Geobios, 41. Madzia, D. (2014). The first non-avian theropod from the Czech Republic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(4). Mateus, I., et al. (1998). Upper Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur embryos from Lourinhã (Portugal). Memorias da Academia de Ciencias de Lisboa, Vol.37. Mateus, O., A. Walen and M.T. Antunes (2006). The Large Theropod Fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its Similarity to the Morrison Formation, With a Description of a New Species of Allosaurus. In: Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 36. Naish, D. (1999). Theropod dinosaur diversity and palaeobiology in the Wealden Group (Early Cretaceous) of England: evidence from a previously undescribed tibia. Geologie en Mijnbouw, 78. Rauhut, O.W.M. and A. Hungerbühler (1998). A Review of European Triassic Theropods. GAIA, Number 15. Rauhut, O.W.M. and J. Kriwet (1994). Teeth of a big Theropod Dinosaur from Porto das Barcas (Portugal). Berliner geowiss. Abh., E 13. Torices, A., et al. (2015). Theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of the South Pyrenees Basin of Spain. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(3). Ribeiro, V, et al. (2014). Two new theropod egg sites from the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal. Historical Biology, Vol.26, Number 2. Zinke, J. and O.W.M. Rauhut (1994). Small theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia) from the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous of the Iberian Peninsula. Berliner geowiss. Abh., E 13. General Theropoda - North America Dalman, S.G. (2014). New data on small theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Como Bluff, Wyoming, USA. Volumina Jurassica, XII(2). Fiorillo, A.R. and R.A. Gangloff (2000). Theropod Teeth from the Prince Creek Formation (Cretaceous) of Northern Alaska, With Speculations on Arctic Dinosaur Paleoecology. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(4). Fiorillo, A.R. and P.J. Currie (1994). Theropod Teeth from the Judith River Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of South-Central Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 14(1). Gates, T.A., L.E. Zanno and P.J. Mackovicky (2015). Theropod teeth from the upper Maastrichtian Hell Creek Formation "Sue" Quarry: New morphotypes and faunal comparisons. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 60(1). Henderson, D.M. (1998). Skull and Tooth Morphology as Indicators of Niche Partitioning in Sympatric Morrison Formation Theropods. Gaia, Number 15. Paul, G.S. (1988). Small Predatory Dinosaurs of the Mid-Mesozoic: The Horned Theropods of the Morrison and Great Oolite - Ornitholestes and Proceratosaurus - and the Sickle-Claw Theropods of the Cloverly, Djadokhta and Judith River - Deinonychus, Velociraptor and Saurornitholestes. Hunteria, Vol.2, Number 4. Sankey, J.T., et al. (2002). Small Theropod and Bird Teeth from the Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian) Judith River Group, Alberta. J.Paleont., 76(4). Sarigul, V. (2017). New Theropod Fossils from the Upper Triassic Dockum Group of Texas, USA, and a Brief Overview of the Dockum Theropod Diversity. PaleoBios, 34. Wick, S.L., T.M. Lehman and A.A. Brink (2015). A theropod tooth assemblage from the lower Aguja Formation (early Campanian) of West Texas, and the roles of small theropod and varanoid lizard mesopredators in a tropical predator guild. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 418. Williamson, T.E. and S.L. Brusatte (2014). Small Theropod Teeth from the Late Cretaceous of the San Juan Basin, Northwestern New Mexico and Their Implications for Understanding Latest Cretaceous Dinosaur Evolution. PLoS ONE, 9(4). Zanno, L.E., et al. (2010). A Preliminary Report on the Theropod Dinosaur Fauna of the Late Campanian Kaiparowits Formation, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. In: Learning from the Land, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Science Symposium Proceedings. Eaton, M. (ed.), Grand Staircase-Escalante Partners, Kanab, Utah. General Theropoda - South America/Central America/Caribbean Canale, J.I., et al. (2017). The oldest theropods from the Neuquen Basin: Predatory dinosaur diversity from the Bajada Colorada Formation (Lower Cretaceous: Berriasian-Valanginian), Neuquen, Argentina. Cretaceous Research, 71. Candeiro, C.R.A., P.J. Currie and L.P. Bergqvist (2012). Theropod teeth from the Marília Formation (Late Maastrichtian) at the paleontological site of Peirópolis in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Geociências, Vol.42(2). Ezcurra, M.D. (2009). Theropod remains from the uppermost Cretaceous of Colombia and their implications for the palaeozoogeography of western Gondwana. Cretaceous Research, 30. (Author's personal copy) Ezcurra, M.D. and F.E. Novas (2016). Theropod dinosaurs from Argentina. Machado, E.B., D. de A. Campos and A.W.A. Kellner (2008). On a theropod scapula (Upper Cretaceous) from the Marilia Formation, Bauru Group, Brazil. Palaontologische Zeitschrift, 82/3. Motta, M.J., et al. (2016). New Theropod Fauna from the Upper Cretaceous (Huincul Formation) of Northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. In: Cretaceous Period: Biotic Diversity and Biogeography. Khosla, A. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 71. Novas, F.E., et al. (2013). Evolution of the carnivorous dinosaurs during the Cretaceous: The evidence from Patagonia. Cretaceous Research, xxx. (Article in press) Rauhut, O.W.M. (2007). A fragmentary theropod skull from the Middle Jurassic of Patagonia. Ameghiniana, 44(2). General Theropoda Barta, D.E., S.J. Nesbitt and M.A. Norell (2017). The evolution of the manus of early theropod dinosaurs is characterized by high inter- and intraspecific variation. Journal of Anatomy (2017). (Thanks to Troodon for finding this one!) Benson, R.B.J., et al. (2012). Air-filled postcranial bones in theropod dinosaurs: physiological implications and the 'reptile'-bird transition. Biological Reviews, 87. Brink, K.S., et al. (2015). Developmental and evolutionary novelty in the serrated teeth of theropod dinosaurs. Scientific Reports, 5:12338. (Thanks to doushantuo for finding this one!) Carpenter, K. (2002). Forelimb Biomechanics of Nonavian Theropod Dinosaurs in Predation. Senckenbergiana lethaea, 82(1). Carpenter, K. (1998). Evidence of Predatory Behavior by Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Gaia, Number 15. Christiansen, P. (1998). Strength Indicator Values of Theropod Long Bones, With Comments on Limb Proportions and Cursorial Potential. Gaia, Number 15. Christiansen, P. and R.A. Farina (2004). Mass Prediction in Theropod Dinosaurs. Historical Biology, Vol.16(2-4). Chure, D.J. (1998). On the Orbit of Theropod Dinosaurs. Gaia, Number 15. Foth, C. and O.W.M. Rauhut (2013). Macroevolutionary and morphofunctional patterns in theropod skulls: A morphometric approach. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(1). Gatesy, S.M. (1990). Caudofemoral musculature and the evolution of theropod locomotion. Paleobiology, 16(2). Gatesy, S.M., M. Baker and J.R. Hutchinson (2009). Constraint-Based Exclusion of Limb Poses for Reconstructing Theropod Dinosaur Locomotion. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 29(2). Gatesy, S.M., et al. (1999). Three-dimensional preservation of foot movements in Triassic theropod dinosaurs. Nature (Letters), Vol.399. Gilmore, C.W. (1920). Osteology of the Carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, With Special Reference to the Genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. United States National Museum, Bulletin 110. (213 pages) Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (1998). Global Correlation of the Triassic Theropod Record. GAIA, Number 15. Hendrickx, C. and O. Mateus (2012). Ontogenetical changes in the quadrates of basal tetanurans. Hendrickx, C., Araujo, R. and O. Mateus (2015). The non-avian theropod quadrate I: standardized terminology with an overview of the anatomy and function. PeerJ, 3:e1245. Hendrickx, C., O. Mateus and R. Araujo (2015). A Proposed Terminology of Theropod Teeth (Dinosauria, Saurischia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, e982797. Hendrickx, C., S.A. Hartman and O. Mateus (2015). An Overview of Non-Avian Theropod Discoveries and Classification. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 12,1. Holtz, T.R. (1998). A New Phylogeny of the Carnivorous Dinosaurs. GAIA, Number 15. Holtz, T.R. (1998). Theropod Paleobiology, More Than Just Bird Origins. GAIA, Number 15. Holtz, T.R. (1994). The Arctometatarsalian Pes, an Unusual Structure of the Metatarsus of Cretaceous Theropoda (Dinosauria: Saurischia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 14(4). Hone, D.W.E. (2010). Dinosaurs of a Feather. BCAS, Vol.24, Number 2. Hone, D.W.E. and O.W.M. Rauhut (2010). Feeding behaviour and bone utilization by theropod dinosaurs. Lethaia, Vol.43. Hutchinson, J.R. and V. Allen (2008). The evolutionary continuum of limb function from early theropods to birds. Naturwissenschaften. Kane, A., et al. (2016). Body Size as a Driver of Scavenging in Theropod Dinosaurs. The American Naturalist, Vol.187, Number 6. Larson, D.W. and P.J. Currie (2013). Multivariate Analyses of Small Theropod Dinosaur Teeth and Implications for Paleoecological Turnover through Time. PLoS ONE, 8(1). Larson, P.L. (1998). The Theropod Reproductive System. Gaia, Number 15. Larsson, H.C.E., P.C. Sereno and J.A. Wilson (2000). Forebrain Enlargement Among Nonavian Theropod Dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(3). Lautenschlager, S., et al. (2013). Edentulism, beaks, and biomechanical innovations in the evolution of theropod dinosaurs. PNAS, Vol.119, Number 51. Middleton, K.M. and S.M. Gatesy (2000). Theropod forelimb design and evolution. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 128. Nesbitt, S.J., et al. (2009). The Theropod Furcula. Journal of Morphology, 000-000. Padian, K., J.R. Hutchinson and T.R. Holtz (1999). Phylogenetic Definitions and Nomenclature of the Major Taxonomic Categories of the Carnivorous Dinosauria (Theropoda). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 19(1). Rauhut, O.W.M. (2007). The myth of the conservative character: braincase characters in theropod phylogenies. Hallesches Jahrb.Geowiss., Vol.23. Rauhut, O.W.M. (2003). The Interrelationships and Evolution of Basal Theropod Dinosaurs. The Palaeontological Society, Special Papers in Palaeontology Number 69. (214 pages) Rayfield, E.J. (2005). Using Finite-Element Analysis to Investigate Suture Morphology: A Case Study Using Large Carnivorous Dinosaurs. The Anatomical Record Part A, 283A. Rothschild, B. and D.H. Tanke (2005). 18. Theropod Paleopathology: State-of-the-Art Review. In: The Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Carpenter, K. (ed.), Indiana University Press. Ruben, J.A., et al. (1999). Pulmonary Function and Metabolic Physiology of Theropod Dinosaurs. Science (Reports), Vol.283. Schmerge, J.D. and B.M. Rothschild (2016). Distribution of the dentary groove of theropod dinosaurs: Implications for theropod phylogeny and the validity of the genus Nanotyrannus Bakker et al., 1988. Cretaceous Research, 61. Smith, J.B., D.R. Vann and P. Dodson (2005). Dental Morphology and Variations in Theropod Dinosaurs: Implications for the Taxonomic Identification of Isolated Teeth. The Anatomical Record Part A, 285A. Snively, E. (2012). Rigid Body Mechanics of Prey Capture in Large Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Masters Thesis - Ohio University. Stevens, K.A. (2006). Binocular Vision in Theropod Dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26(2). Tanke, D.H. and P.J. Currie (1998). Head-Biting Behavior in Theropod Dinosaurs: Paleopathological Evidence. Gaia, Number 15. Tarsitano, S. (1983). Stance and Gait in Theropod Dinosaurs. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol.28, Numbers 1-2. Therrien, F. and D.M. Henderson (2007). My Theropod is Bigger Than Yours...or Not: Estimating Body Size from Skull Length in Theropods. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 27(1). Therrien, F., D.M. Henderson and C.B. Ruff (2005). 10. Bite Me. Biomechanical Models of Theropod Mandibles and Implications for Feeding Behavior. In: The Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Carpenter, K. (ed.), Indiana University Press. White, M.A. (2009). The subarctometatarsus: intermediate metatarsus architecture demonstrating the evolution of the arctometatarsus and advanced agility in theropod dinosaurs. Alcheringa, 33. Zanno, L.E. and P.J. Makovicky (2011). Herbivorous ecomorphology and specialization patterns in theropod dinosaur evolution. PNAS, Vol.108, Number 1. Zelenitsky, D.K. (2006). Reproductive Traits of Non-Avian Theropods. J.Paleont.Soc. Korea, Vol.22, Number 1.
  7. Dinosaur Track? Nova Scotia

    ...Will post 3 more images Is this a Dinosaur footprint? Looks like Theropod maybe? Found on Nova Scotia Beach Any insight is appreciated for this amateur. Thanks in advance.
  8. junKundrtcaizhitheropdinosaoviraptosganzhouchinalagersta46-6.pdf Given the source publications,do not expect the use of popular nomenclature. I found the possible presence of a rhamphotheca("beak/bill") intriguing,to say the least. Oh yeah,it contains a cladogram,constructed by TNT. Postzygodiapophyseal,try to say that three times in succession,quickly
  9. unreasonable predation clause

    Manning et al 2009 Dromaeosaur claws.pdf outtake: avoid when allergic to splines,meshes,trusses,and other modelling
  10. antarctic dinosaur

    plus some phylogenetic testing of megaraptoran affinities,and paleobiological implications smimackovicryolophosantarcdinosaud25.x.pdf Some of you might actually like this(those who like their literature technical)
  11. lot of neck,no woods

    some of you may like this,others may find my style too cryptic to consider opening this. Ignore at your own peril sniveltheropdinosaneckcervicalbiomechanicmethod34.x.pdf
  12. hunting in packs?

    from a while back,but a lemon in the basket. rodeinon_Dinosaur.pdf
  13. feathered,hold the tar

    nat-alado.pdf ok,it's from a while back,and thus old hat Some of you might never get enough of well-preserved dinos,like me. some phylogenetic inferences*,the stringent Nature editing,what more do you want? edit: to own the specimen,obviously *" extensive feathering of the pes was a critical modification in the transition to birds and thatthe pedal scales of extant birds might be secondarily derived structures, a possibility also supported by some developmental studies."
  14. I use it for holding fork and knife

    For what it's worth(coz,like,what do I know,right?) this comes with a high recommendation from yours truly.. I won't even check if that's the case,but this little gem MUST be paywalled,for sure. The author does what he does best:"talkin' about dinosaurs" carrForen_theropod.pdf
  15. the young one(no,not Neil)

    MEGAR
  16. abelisaruid size

    I made a trip to the near future... edit:and Yes,i realize my horrendous spelling mistake CR95667116301902-main.pdf
  17. Smith on T rex dentition

    http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1671/0272-4634(2005)025[0865%3AHITRIF]2.0.CO%3B2 If it's been posted already,my apologies to the previous poster. However,i don't this one want to sink into relative obscurity
  18. 200-Million Year Old Theropod from Wales

    Here is an article from Paleontology News about the new theropod, Dracoraptor http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160120202414.htm A new carnivorous dinosaur species named Dracoraptor hanigani uncovered in the south of Wales is possibly the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur from the UK, according to a study published January 20, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Martill from the University of Portsmouth, England, and colleagues from National Museum Wales and University of Manchester. The authors of this study that analyzed the dinosaur skull and bones, discovered in 2014 on a beach near Penarth, Wales, conclude it is a new species that they have named Dracoraptor hanigani. The name Dracoraptor means 'dragon robber.' Draco, meaning dragon, is the national symbol of Wales. The species name honors Nick and Rob Hanigan, who discovered the fossil. From their analysis, the researchers believe this dinosaur was meat-eating, from the theropod group. They also suggested that it may have been a juvenile animal, as most of its bones were not yet fully formed or fused. Compared to its distant relative the T. rex, it appears to be a small, agile animal, probably only about 70 cm tall and about 200 cm long, with a long tail, likely to help it balance. It lived at the beginning of the Jurassic Period (201 million years ago), at the time when south Wales was a coastal region like it is today. However, at the time, the climate was much warmer, and dinosaurs were just starting to diversify. The new specimen represents the most complete theropod from Wales, and may possibly represent one of the oldest known Jurassic dinosaurs in the UK or even in the world. Co-author Mr. Vidovic adds, "The Triassic-Jurassic extinction event is often credited for the later success of dinosaurs through the Jurassic and Cretaceous, but previously we knew very little about dinosaurs at the start of this diversification and rise to dominance. Now we have Dracoraptor, a relatively complete two meter long juvenile theropod from the very earliest days of the Jurassic in Wales."
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