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Found 3 results

  1. Thylacoleo partial-skull replica

    Greetings, all: I'm new here, so I apologize if I did something skewy on my first submission. Anyway, I'd like to share an image or two of a thylacoleo carnifex skull replica I've been working on (well, OFF and on) for the past two years. It's a partial skull, but I did that to enhance (what I thing) may be the "realism" of the sculpt, since it's not common to find a "perfect" specimen in the field. Anyway, enjoy!
  2. Thylacoleo carnifex

    Heres one of my favourite finds of last year; a Thylacoleo carnifex premolar. The tooth measures about 4cm long by 3cm wide and is pretty worn, but I love its colours! Found near Tambar Springs NSW
  3. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 28, 2018. Infraclass Marsupialia Superorder Ameridelphia Order Didelphimorphia Family Didelphidae - American Opossums and Their Relatives. Subfamily Caluromyinae - Woolly Opossums, Bushy-tailed Opossums and Their Relatives Flores, D.A. and M.M. Díaz (2009). Postcranial Skeleton of Glironia venusta (Didelphimorphia, Didelphidae, Caluromyinae): Description and Functional Morphology. Zoosyst.Evol., 85(2). Subfamily Derorhynchinae (†) Simpson, G.G. (1938). A New Marsupial from the Eocene of Patagonia. American Museum Novitates, Number 989. Subfamily Didelphinae - American Opossums and Their Relatives Bown, T.M. and K.D. Rose (1979). Mimoperadectes, a New Marsupial, and Worlandia, a New Dermopteran, from the Lower Part of the Willwood Formation (Early Eocene), Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Contributions of the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.25, Number 4. Goin, F.J., et al. (2009). A new large didelphid of the genus Thylophorops (Mammalia: Didelphomorphia: Didelphidae), from the late Tertiary of the Pampean Region (Argentina). Simpson, G.G. (1968). A Didelphid (Marsupialia) from the Early Eocene of Colorado. Peabody Museum of Natural History Postilla, Number 115. Subfamily Herpetotheriinae (†) Case, J.A., F.J. Goin and M.O. Woodburne (2004). "South American" Marsupials from the Late Cretaceous of North America and the Origin of Marsupial Cohorts. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol.11, Numbers 3/4. Gabbert, S.L. (1998). Basicranial Anatomy of Herpetotherium (Marsupialia: Didelphimorphia) from the Eocene of Wyoming. American Museum Novitates, Number 3235. Hayes, G.F. (2005). Arikareean (Oligocene-Miocene) Herpetotherium (Marsupialia, Didelphidae) from Nebraska and Florida. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History, Vol.45, Number 4. Horovitz, I., et al. (2008). The anatomy of Herpetotherium cf. fugax Cope, 1873, a metatherian from the Oligocene of North America. Palaeontographica Abt. A, 284. Selva, C. and S. Ladeveze (2016). Computed microtomography investigation of the skull of Cuvier's famous 'opossum' (Marsupialiformes, Herpetotheriidae) from the Eocene of Montmartre. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. Subfamily Hyladelphinae Oliveira, E.V., et al. (2011). A new hyladelphine marsupial (Didelphimorpha, Didelphidae) from cave deposits of northern Brazil. Zootaxa, 3041. General Didelphidae Chemisquy, M.A., et al. (2015). Evolution of molar shape in didelphid marsupials (Marsupialia: Didelphidae): analysis of the influence of ecological factors and phylogenetic legacy. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 173. Family incertae sedis Subfamily Adinodontinae (†) Hershkovitz, P. (1995). The staggered marsupial third lower incisor: hallmark of cohort Didelphimorphia, and description of a new genus and species with staggered i3 from the Albian (Lower Cretaceous) of Texas. Bonn.zool.Beitr., Vol.45, Numbers 3-4. Family Paradectidae (†) Rose, K.D. (2010). A New Marsupial from the Early Eocene of Virginia. J.Paleont., 84(3). Family Sparassocynidae (†) Forasiepi, A.M., F.J. Goin and A.G. Martinelli (2009). Contribution to the Knowledge of the Sparassocynidae (Mammalia, Metatheria, Didelphoidea), With Comments on the Age of the Aisol Formation (Neogene), Mendoza Province, Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 29(4). General Didelphimorphia Bajpai, S., et al. (2005). First Fossil Marsupials from India: Early Eocene Indodelphis N.Gen. and Jaegeria N.Gen. from Vastan Lignite Mine, District Surat, Gujarat. Journal of the Palaeontological Society of India, 50(1). de Muizon, C. and R.L. Cifelli (2001). A New Basal "Didelphoid" (Marsupialia, Mammalia) from the Early Paleocene of Tiupampa (Bolivia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 21(1). de Paula Couto, C. (1952). Fossil Mammals from the Beginning of the Cenozoic in Brazil. Marsupialia: Didelphidae. American Museum Novitates, Number 1567. Horovitz, I., et al. (2009). Cranial Anatomy of the Earliest Marsupials and the Origin of Opossums. PLoS ONE, 4(12). (Read on-line or download from site) Simpson, G.G. (1974). Notes on Didelphidae (Mammalia, Marsupialia) from the Huayquerian (Pliocene) of Argentina. American Museum Novitates, Number 2559. Simpson, G.G. (1928). Zootaxa 2005. American Eocene Didelphids. American Museum Novitates, Number 307. Turnbull, W.D. (1960). A Lance Didelphid Molar With Comments on the Problems of Lance Therians. Fieldiana Geology, Vol.10, Number 36. Villa Nova, P., L.S. Avilla and É.V. Oliveira (2015). Didelphidae marsupials (Mammalia, Didelphimorphia) from the Late Pleistocene deposit of the Gruta dos Moura Cave, northern Brazil. Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, 87(1). Order Paucituberculata - Shrew Opossums Family Abderitidae (†) Dumont, E.R., S.G. Strait and A.R. Friscia (2000). Abderitid Marsupials from the Miocene of Patagonia: An Assessment of Form, Function and Evolution. J.Paleont., 74(6). Family Caenolestidae Marshall, L.G. (1980). Systematics of the South American Marsupial Family Caenolestidae. Fieldiana Geology, New Series Number 5. Family Palaeothentidae (†) Abello, M.A. and A.M. Candela (2010). Postcranial Skeleton of the Miocene Marsupial Palaeothentes (Paucituberculata, Palaeothentidae): Paleobiology and Phylogeny. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(5). Bown, T.M. and J.G. Fleagle (1993). Systematics, Biostratigraphy and Dental Evolution of the Palaeothentidae, Later Oligocene to Early-Middle Miocene (Deseadan-Santacrucian) Caenolestoid Marsupials of South America. USGS Staff-Published Research, 209. Forasiepi, A.M., et al. (2014). An exceptionally well-preserved skeleton of Palaeothentes from the Early Miocene of Patagonia: new insights into the anatomy of extinct paucituberculatan marsupials. Swiss J.Palaeontol. Goin, F.J., et al. (2003). A New Palaeothentid Marsupial from the Middle Miocene of Bolivia. Palaeontology, Vol.46, Part 2. Rincon, A.D., et al. (2015). Palaeothentid Marsupials of the Salla Beds of Bolivia (Late Oligocene): Two New Species and Insights into the Post-Eocene Radiation of Palaeothentoids. J.Mammal.Evol. General Paucituberculata Goin, F.J., et al. (2009). Earliest South American paucituberculatans and their significance in the understanding of 'pseudodiprotodont' marsupial radiations. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 155. Goin, F.J., et al. (2007). A New Generalized Paucituberculatan Marsupial from the Oligocene of Bolivia and the Origin of 'Shrew-Like' Opossums. Palaeontology, Vol.50, Part 5. Order Polydolopimorphia (†) - South American Marsupials Babot, M.J. and D.A. Garcia-Lopez (2016). Redescription of the argyrolagid Microtragulus bolivianus (Metatheria, Polydolopimorphia, Bonapartheriiformes) based on new remains from Northwestern Argentina. Palaeontologia Electronica, 19.2.23A. Beck, R.M.D. (2016). The Skull of Epidolops ameghinoi from the Early Eocene Itaborai Fauna, Southeastern Brazil, and Affinities of the Extinct Marsupialiform Order Polydolopimorphia. J.Mammal.Evol. Chornogubsky, L., F.J. Goin and M. Reguero (2009). A reassessment of Antarctic polydolopid marsupials (Middle Eocene, La Meseta Formation). Antarctic Science, 21(3). Flynn, J.J. and A.R. Wyss (2004). Chapter 6. A Polydolopine Marsupial Skull from the Cachapoal Valley, Andean Main Range, Chile. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Number 285. Garcia-Lopez, D.A. and M.J. Babot (2015). A Late Miocene Argyrolagidae (Mammalia, Metatheria, Bonapartheriiformes) from Northwestern Argentina. Ameghiniana, Vol.52(3). Goin, F.J. and E.V. Oliveira (2007). A new species of Gashternia (Marsupialia) from Itaborai (Brazil). N.Jb.Geol.Palaont. Abh., Vol.245/3. Goin, F.J., A.M. Candela and C. De Muizon (2003). The Affinities of Roberthoffstetteria nationalgeographica (Marsupialia) and the Origin of the Polydolopine Molar Pattern. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 23(4). Goin, F.J., E.V. Oliveira and A.M. Candela (1998). Carolocoutoia ferigoloi Nov.Gen. and Sp. (Protodidelphidae), a New Paleocene "Opossum-Like" Marsupial from Brazil. Palaeovertebrata, Montpelier, 27(3-4). Superorder Australidelphia Order Notoryctemorphia - Marsupial 'Moles' Family Notoryctidae Archer, M., et al. (2011). Australia's first fossil marsupial mole (Notoryctemorphia) resolves controversies about their evolution and palaeoenvironmental origins. Proc.R.Soc. B, 278. Beck, R.M.D., et al. (2016). Going underground: postcranial morphology of the early Miocene marsupial mole Naraboryctes philcreaseri and the evolution of fossoriality in notoryctemorphians. Memoirs of Museum Victoria, 74. Order Microbiotheria Family Microbiotheriidae Goin, F.J., et al. (2007). New Marsupial (Mammalia) from the Eocene of Antarctica, and the Origins and Affinities of the Microbiotheria. Revista de la Asociacion Geologica Argentina, 62(4). Hershkovitz, P. (1999). Dromiciops gliroides Thomas, 1894, Last of the Microbiotheria (Marsupialia), with a Review of the Microbiotheriidae. Fieldiana Zoology, New Series, Number 93. Marshall, L.G. (1982). Systematics of the South American Marsupial Family Microbiotheriidae. Fieldiana Geology, New Series Number 10. Order Dasyuromorphia Family Dasyuridae - Tasmanian Devil and its Relatives Archer, M., et al. (2016). Earliest known record of a hypercarnivorous dasyurid (Marsupialia) from newly discovered carbonates beyond the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, north Queensland. Memoirs of Museum Victoria, 74. Guiler, E.R. (1982). Temporal and Spatial Distribution of the Tasmanian Devil, Sarcophilus harrisi (Dasyuridae, Marsupialia). Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, Vol.116. Sobbe, I.H. and G.J. Price (2014). Confirmation of the Presence of the Spotted-Tailed Quoll, Dasyurus maculatus (Dasyuridae, Marsupialia) from the Late Pleistocene King Creek Catchment, Darling Downs, Southeastern Queensland, Australia. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum | Nature 59. Van Dyck, S. (1982). Antechinus puteus (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae), A New Fossil Species from the Texas Caves, Southeastern Queensland. Aust.Mammal., 5. Wroe, S. (1999). The Geologically Oldest Dasyurid, From the Miocene of Riversleigh, North-West Queensland. Palaeontology, Vol.42, Part 3. Wroe, S. (1998). A new 'bone-cracking' dasyurid (Marsupialia) from the Miocene of Riversleigh, northwestern Queensland. Alcheringa, 22. Wroe, S. (1997). A Reexamination of Proposed Morphology-Based Synapomorphies for the Families of Dasyuromorphia (Marsupialia). I. Dasyuridae. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol.4, Number 1. Family incertae sedis Wroe, S. (2001). A new genus and species of dasyuromorphian from the Miocene of Riversleigh, northern Australia. Memoirs of the Australian Association of Palaeontologists, 25. Family Malleodectidae (†) Archer, M., et al. (2016). A new family of bizarre durophagous carnivorous marsupials from Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland. Scientific Reports, 6:26911. Family Myrmecobiidae - Numbats Zemann, A., et al. (2013). Ancestry of the Australian Termitivorous Numbat. Molecular Biology and Evolution. Family Thylacinidae (†) - Tasmanian 'Tiger'/'Wolf' and its Relatives Archer, M. (1974). 7. - New information about the Quaternary distribution of the thylacine (Marsupialia, Thylacinidae) in Australia. Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia, Vol.57, Part 2. Attard, M.R.G., et al. (2014). Virtual Reconstruction and Prey Size Preference in the Mid Cenozoic Thylacinid Nimbacinus dicksoni (Thylacinidae, Marsupialia). PLoS ONE, 9(4). Figueirido, B. and C.M. Janis (2011). The predatory behaviour of the thylacine: Tasmanian tiger or marsupial wolf? Biol.Lett., 7(6). Heberle, G. (2004). Reports of alleged thylacine sightings in Western Australia. Conservation Science W.Aust., 5(1). Krajewski, C., et al. (1992). Phylogenetic relationships of of the thylacine (Mammalia: Thylacinidae) among dasyuroid marsupials: evidence from cytochrome b DNA sequences. Proc.R.Soc.Lond. B, 250. Letnic, M., M. Fillios and M.S. Crowther (2012). Could Direct Killing by Larger Dingoes Have Caused the Extinction of the Thylacine from Mainland Australia? PLoS ONE, 7(5). Mackness, B.S., et al. (2002). Confirmation of Thylacinus from the Pliocene Chinchilla Local Fauna. Australian Mammalogy, 24. Menzies, B.R., et al. (2012). Limited Genetic Diversity Preceded Extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger. PLoS ONE, 7(4). Muirhead, J. (1992). A Specialized Thylacinid, Thylacinus macknessi, (Marsupialia: Thylacinidae) from Miocene Deposits of Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland. Australian Mammalogy, 15. Muirhead, J. and A.K. Gillespie (1995). Additional Parts of the Type Specimen of Thylacinus macknessi (Marsupialia: Thylacinidae) from Miocene Deposits of Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland. Australian Mammalogy, 18. Muirhead, J. and M. Archer (1990). Nimbacinus dicksoni, a Plesiomorphic Thylacine (Marsupialia: Thylacinidae) from Tertiary Deposits of Queensland and the Northern Territory. Mem.Qd.Mus., 28(1). Muirhead, J. and S. Wroe (1998). A New Genus and Species, Badjcinus turnbulli (Thylacinidae: Marsupiala), from the Late Oligocene of Riversleigh, Northern Australia, and an Investigation of Thylacinid Phylogeny.Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 18(3). Murray, P. and D. Megirian (2000). Two new genera and three new species of Thylacinidae (Marsupialia) from the Miocene of the Northern Territory, Australia. The Beagle, Records of the Museums and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, 16. Wroe, S. (1996). Muribacinus gadiyuli, (Thylacinidae: Marsupialia), A Very Plesiomorphic Thylacinid from the Miocene of Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland, and the Problem of Paraphyly for the Dasyuridae (Marsupialia). Journal of Paleontology, Vol.70, Number 6. Wroe, S. and A. Musser (2001). Tne skull of Nimbacinus dicksoni (Thylacinidae: Marsupialia). Australian Journal of Zoology, 49. Yates, A.M. (2015). Thylacinus (Marsupialia: Thylacinidae) from the Mio-Pliocene boundary and the diversity of Late Neogene thylacinids in Australia. PeerJ 3: e931. Yates, A.M. (2014). New craniodental remains of Thylacinus potens (Dasyuromorphis: Thylacinidae), a carnivorous marsupial from the late Miocene Alcoota Local Fauna of central Australia. PeerJ 2: e547. General Dasyuromorphia Cramb, J., S. Hocknull and G.E. Webb (2009). High diversity Pleistocene rainforest Dasyurid assemblages with implications for the radiation of the dasyuridae. Austral Ecology, 34(6). Wroe, S., et al. (2000). Cladistic Analysis of Dasyuromorphan (Marsupialia) Phylogeny Using Cranial and Dental Characters. Journal of Mammalogy, 81(4). Order Peramelemorphia - Bandicoots and Bilbies Family Chaeropodidae (†) - Pig-footed Bandicoots Hocknull, S.A. (2005). Late Pleistocene-Holocene Occurrence of Chaeropus (Paramelidae) and Macrotis (Thylacomyidae) from Queensland. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, Vol.51, Part 1. Travouillon, K.J. (2016). Oldest fossil remains of the enigmatic pig-footed bandicoot show rapid herbivorous evolution. R.Soc. open sci., 3. Wright, W., G.D. Sanson and C. McArthur (1991). Chapter 8. The Diet of the Extinct Bandicoot Chaeropus ecaudatus. In: Vertebrate Palaeontology of Australia. Vickers-Rich, P., et al. (eds.), Pioneer Design Studio in cooperation with Monash University Publications Committee, Melbourne. Family incertae sedis Chamberlain, P.M., et al. (2016). Kutjamarcoot brevisrostrum, gen. et sp.nov., a new short-snouted, early Miocene bandicoot (Marsupialia: Paramelimorphia) from the Kutjamarpu Local Fauna (Wipajiri Formation) in South Australia. Alcheringa, 40. Gurovich, Y., et al. (2014). Biogeographical implications of a new mouse-sized fossil bandicoot (Marsupialia: Paramelemorphia) occupying a dasyurid-like ecological niche across Australia. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, Vol.12, Issue 3. Travouillon, K.J., et al. (2015). Sexually dimorphic bandicoots (Marsupialia: Paramelemorphia) from the Oligo-Miocene of Australia, first cranial ontogeny for fossil bandicoots and new species descriptions. Journal of Mammalian Evolution. Travouillon, K.J., et al. (2013). The oldest fossil record of bandicoots (Marsupialia; Paramelemorphia) from the late Oligocene of Australia. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.16, Issue 2. Travouillon, K.J., et al. (2013). The Genus Galadi: Three New Bandicoots (Marsupialia, Paramelemorphia) from Riversleigh's Miocene Deposits, Northwestern Queensland, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 33(1). Family Paramelidae - Bandicoots Mackness, B.S., et al. (2000). First Fossil Bandicoot from the Pliocene Chinchilla Local Fauna. Australian Mammalogy, 22. Muirhead, J., L. Dawson and M. Archer (1997). Parameles bowenensis, a New Species of Parameles (Paramelemorphia, Marsupialia) from Pliocene Faunas of Bow and Wellington Caves, New South Wales. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, 117. Price, G.J. (2005). Fossil Bandicoots (Marsupialia, Paramelidae) and environmental change during the Pleistocene on the Darling Downs, southeastern Queensland, Australia. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 2(4). Travouillon, K.J., et al. (2014). Earliest Modern Bandicoot and Bilby (Marsupialia, Paramelidae and Thylacomyidae) from the Miocene of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Northwestern Queensland, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 34(2). Family Thylacomyidae - Bilbies Hocknull, S.A. (2005). Late Pleistocene-Holocene Occurrence of Chaeropus (Paramelidae) and Macrotis (Thylacomyidae) from Queensland. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, Vol.51, Part 1. Travouillon, K.J., et al. (2014). Earliest Modern Bandicoot and Bilby (Marsupialia, Paramelidae and Thylacomyidae) from the Miocene of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Northwestern Queensland, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 34(2). Family Yaralidae (†) Muirhead, J. (2000). Yaraloidea (Marsupialia, Paramelemorphia), a New Superfamily of Marsupial and a Description and Analysis of the Cranium of the Miocene Yarala burchfieldi. Journal of Paleontology, Vol.74, Number 3. Muirhead, J. and S.L. Filan (1995). Yarala burchfieldi, A Plesiomorphic Bandicoot (Marsupialia, Paramelemorphia) from Oligo-Miocene Deposits of Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland. J.Paleont., 69(1). Schwartz, L.R.S. (2006). A New Species of Bandicoot from the Oligocene of Northern Australia and Implications of Bandicoots for Correlating Australian Tertiary Mammal Faunas. Palaeontology, Vol.49, Part 5. Order Diprotodontia Alloing-Seguier, L., et al. (2013). The Bony Labyrinth in Diprotodontian Marsupial Mammals: Diversity in Extant and Extinct Forms and Relationships with Size and Phylogeny. J. Mammal Evol. Lorente, M., L. Chornogubsky and F.J. Goin (2016). On the Existence of Non-Microbiotherian Australidelphian Marsupials (Diprotodontia) in the Eocene of Patagonia. Palaeontology, 2016. Family Thylacoleonidae (†) - Marsupial 'Lion' Anderson, C. (1929). Palaeontological Notes No.1. Macropus titan Owen and Thylacoleo carnifex Owen. Records of the Australian Museum, 7(1). Arman, S.D. and G.J. Prideaux (2016). Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave. Scientific Reports, 6:21372. Curry, M., L. Reed and S. Bourne (2014). Catching the Marsupial 'Lion' by the Tail: Thylacoleo carnifex and the Naracoorte Caves. ACKMA Journal, Number 97. Gill, E.D. (1973). Antipodal Distribution of the Holotype Bones of Thylacoleo carnifex Owen (Marsupialia). Sci.Rep., Tohoko Univ., 2nd Series (Geol.), Special Volume Number 6. Gillespie, A.K., M. Archer and S.J. Hand (2017). A new Oligo-Miocene marsupial lion from Australia and revision of the family Thylacoleonidae. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 2017. (Thanks to Kasia for pointing me to this one!) Gillespie, A.K., M. Archer and S.J. Hand (2016). A tiny new marsupial lion (Marsupialia, Thylacoleonidae) from the Early Miocene of Australia. Palaeontologia Electronica, 19.2.26A. Gillespie, A.K., et al. (2014). New material referable to Wakaleo (Marsupialia: Thylacoleonidae) from the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland: revising species boundaries and distributions in Oligo/Miocene marsupial lions. Alcheringa, 38. Owen, Prof. (1883). Pelvic Characters of Thylacoleo carnifex. Phil.Trans.R.Soc.Lond., 174, XIX. Owen, Prof. (1866). On the Fossil Mammals of Australia - Part II. Description of an almost entire Skull of Thylacoleo carnifex, Owen, from a freshwater deposit, Darling Downs, Queensland. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Vol.156, Article IV. Owen, Prof. (1859). On the Fossil Mammals of Australia - Part I. Description of a mutilated Skull of a large Marsupial Carnivore (Thylacoleo carnifex, Owen), from a calcareous conglomerate stratum, eighty miles S.W. of Melbourne, Victoria. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Vol.149, Article XVI. Pledge, N.S. (1975). A New Species of Thylacoleo (Marsupiala: Thylacoleonidae) with Notes on the Occurrences and Distribution of Thylacoleonidae in South Australia. Rec. S. Aust. Mus., 17(16). Wroe, S., et al. (2003). An alternative method for predicting body mass: the case of the Pleistocene marsupial lion. Paleobiology, 29(3). Wroe, S., et al., (1999). Estimating the weight of the Pleistocene marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex (Thylacoleonidae: Marsupialia): implications for the ecomorphology of a marsupial super-predator and hypotheses of impoverishment of Australian marsupial carnivore faunas.Australian Journal of Zoology, 47. Yates, A.M. (2015). New craniodental remains of Wakaleo alcootaensis (Diprotodontia: Thylacoleonidae) a carnivorous marsupial from the late Miocene Alcoota Local Fauna of the Northern Territory, Australia. PeerJ, 3:e1408. Suborder Vombatiformes - Koalas, Wombats and Their Relatives Family Maradidae (†) Black, K. (2007). Maradidae: a new family of vombatomorphian marsupial from the late Oligocene of Riversleigh, northwestern Queensland. Alcheringa, 31. Family Phascolarctidae - Koalas and Their Relatives Archer, M., K.H. Black and K. Nettle (1997). Giant Ringtail Possums (Marsupialia, Pseudocheiridae) and Giant Koalas (Phascolarctidae) from the Late Cainozoic of Australia. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, 117. Black, K.H. (2016). Middle Miocene origins for tough-browse dietary specializations in the koala (Mammalia, Phascolarctidae) evolutionary tree: description of a new genus and species from the Riversleigh World Heritage Area. Memoirs of Museum Victoria, 74. Black, K.H. and M. Archer (1997). Nimiokoala Gen.Nov. (Marsupialia, Phascolarctidae) from Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland, With a Revision of Litokoala. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 41(2). Black, K.H., J. Louys and G.J. Price (2014). Understanding morphological variation in the extant koala as a framework for identification of species boundaries in extinct koalas (Phascolarctida; Marsupialia). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, Vol.12, Issue 2. Black, K.H., M. Archer and S.J. Hand (2012). New Tertiary Koala (Marsupialia, Phascolarctidae) from Riversleigh, Australia, With a Revision of Phascolarctid Phylogenetics, Paleoecology and Paleobiodiversity. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 32(1). Louys, J., et al. (2009). Cranial Anatomy of Oligo-Miocene Koalas (Diprotodontia: Phascolarctidae): Stages in the Evolution of an Extreme Leaf-Eating Specialization. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 29(4). (Proof only) Louys, J., et al. (2007). Description of koala fossils from the Miocene of Riversleigh, northwestern Queensland and implications for Litokoala (Marsupialia, Phascolarctidae). Alcheringa, 31. Piper, K.J. (2005). An Early Pleistocene Record of a Giant Koala (Phalascolarctidae, Marsupialia) from Western Victoria. Australian Mammalogy, 27. Pledge, N.S. (2010). A new koala (Marsupialia: Phascolarctidae) from the late Oligocene Etadunna Formation, Lake Eyre Basin, South Australia. Australian Mammalogy, 32. Price, G.J. and S.A. Hocknull (2011). Invictokoala monticola gen. et sp.nov. (Phalascolarctidae, Mammalia), a Pleistocene plesiomorphic koala holdover from Oligocene ancestors. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, Vol.9, Issue 2. Price, G.J., et al. (2009). New Records of Plio-Pleistocene Koalas from Australia: Palaeoecological and Taxonomic Implications. Records of the Australian Museum, Vol.61. Family Vombatidae Louys, J. (2015). Wombats (Vombatidae: Marsupialia) from the Pliocene Chinchilla Sand, southeast Queensland, Australia. Alcheringa, 39, xxx. Superfamily Diprotodontoidea Family Diprotodontidae (†) Camens, A.B. (2010). Systematic and palaeobiological implications of postcranial morphology in the Diprotodontidae (Marsupialia). Ph.D. Thesis - University of Adelaide. (463 pages) Menzies, J., et al. (2008). A possible early age for a diprotodon (Marsupialia: Diprotodontidae) fossil from Papua New Guinea highlands. Alcheringa, 32. Weisbecker, V. and M.R. Sanchez-Villagra (2006). Carpal evolution in diprotodontian marsupials. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 146. Subfamily Diprotodontinae Black, K.H. (2010). Ngapakaldia bonythoni (Marsupialia, Diprotodontidae): new material from Riversleigh, northwestern Queensland, and a reassessment of the genus Bematherium. Alcheringa, iFirst Article. Camens, A.B. and R.T. Wells (2010). Palaeobiology of Euowenia grata (Marsupialia, Diprotodontinae) and its Presence in Northern South Australia. J.Mammal Evol., 17. Mackness, B., K.H. Black and G.J. Price (2014). Occurrence of Euowenia grata (De Vis, 1887) (Diprotodontidae, Marsupialia) from the Pliocene Spring Park Local Fauna, northeastern Queensland. Alcheringa, 39. Pledge, N.S., J.R. Prescott, and J.T. Hutton (2002). A Late Pleistocene Occurrence of Diprotodon at Hallett Cove, South Australia. Trans.R.Soc.S.Aust., 126(1). Price, G.J. (2008). Taxonomy and palaeobiology of the largest-ever marsupial, Diprotodon Owen, 1838 (Diprotodontidae, Marsupialia). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 153. Price, G.J. and I.H. Sobbe (2011). Morphological variation within an individual Pleistocene Diprotodon optatum Owen, 1838 (Diprotodontinae; Marsupialia): implications for taxonomy within diprotodontoids. Alcheringa, 35. Price, G.J. and L.J. Piper (2009). Gigantism of the Australian Diprotodon Owen 1838 (Marsupialia, Diprotodontoidea) through the Pleistocene. Journal of Quaternary Science, 24(8). Sharp, A.C. (2014). Three dimensional digital reconstruction of the jaw adductor musculature of the extinct marsupial giant Diprotodon optatum. PeerJ, 2:e514. Sharp, A.C. and T.H. Rich (2016). Cranial biomechanics, bite force and function of the endocranial sinuses in Diprotodon optatum, the largest known marsupial. Journal of Anatomy, 228(6). Wroe, S., et al. (2003). The size of the largest marsupial and why it matters. Proc.R.Soc.Lond. B (Suppl), 271. Subfamily Zygomaturinae Black, K.H. and S. Hand (2010). First crania and assessment of species boundaries in Nimbadon (Marsupialia, Diprotodontidae) from the Middle Miocene of Australia. American Museum Novitates, Number 3678. (16.4MB download) Black, K.H. and M. Archer (1997). Silvabestius Gen.Nov., A Primitive Zygomaturine (Marsupialia, Diprotodontidae) from Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 41(2). Black, K.H., et al. (2013). Revision in the diprotodontid marsupial genus Neohelos: Systematics and biostratigraphy. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(4). Black, K.H., et al. (2012). Herds Overhead: Nimbadon lavarackorum (Diprotodontidae), Heavyweight Marsupial Herbivores in the Miocene Forests of Australia. PLoS ONE, 7(11). Black, K.H., et al. (2010). First Comprehensive Analysis of Cranial Ontogeny in a Fossil Marsupial - From a 15-Million-Year-Old Cave Deposit in Northern Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(4). Hand, S.J., et al. (1993). Nimbadon, a New Genus and Three New Species of Tertiary Zygomaturines (Marsupialia: Diprotodontidae) from Northern Australia, With a Reassessment of Neohelos. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 33(1). Murray, P., et al. (2000). Morphology, Systematics and Evolution of the Marsupial Genus Neohelos Stirton (Diprotodontidae, Zygomaturinae). MAGNT Research Report Number 6. Family Palochorestidae (†) Trusler, P.W. and A.C. Sharp (2016). Description of new cranial material of Propalorchestes (Marsupialia: Palorchestidae) from the Middle Miocene Camfield Beds, Northern Territory, Australia. Memoirs of Museum Victoria, 74. Suborder Phalangeriformes - Old World Possums Sanchez-Villagra, M.R. and R.F. Kay (1996). Do Phalangeriforms (Marsupialia: Diprotodontia) have a 'Hypocone'? Australian Journal of Zoology, 44. Family Burramyidae - Pygmy Possums Brammall, J. and M. Archer (1997). A New Oligocene-Miocene Species of Burramys (Marsupialia, Burramyidae) from Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 41(2). Harris, J.M. (2008). The Fossil Distribution of the Eastern Pygmy Possum Cercartetus nanus. Australian Mammalogy, 29. Family Miminipossumidae (†) Archer, M., et al. (2018). Miminipossum notioplanetes, a Miocene forest-dwelling phalangeridan (Marsupialia; Diprotodontia) from northern and central Australia. Palaeontologia Electronica, 21.1.2A. Family Pseudocheiridae - Ringtail Possums Archer, M., K.H. Black and K. Nettle (1997). Giant Ringtail Possums (Marsupialia, Pseudocheiridae) and Giant Koalas (Phascolarctidae) from the Late Cainozoic of Australia. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, 117. Roberts, K.K., et al. (2007). New Genus and Species of Extinct Miocene Ringtail Possums (Marsupialia: Pseudocheiridae). American Museum Novitates, Number 3560. Suborder Macropodiformes - Kangaroos, Wallabies and Their Relatives Family Balbaridae (†) Black, K.H., et al. (2014). A New Species of the Basal "Kangaroo" Balbaroo and a Re-Evaluation of Stem Macropodiform Interrelationships. PLoS ONE, 9(11). Family incertae sedis Archer, M. (1979). Wabularoo naughtoni Gen. et Sp.Nov., An Enigmatic Kangarooo (Marsupialia) from the Middle Tertiary Carl Creek Limestone of Northwestern Queensland. Results of the Ray E. Lemley Expeditions, Part 4. Mem.Qd.Mus., 19(3). Family Macropodidae Subfamily Bulungamayinae (†) Butler, K., et al. (2016). Cookeroo, A New Genus of Fossil Kangaroo (Marsupialia, Macropodidae) from the Oligo-Miocene of Riversleigh, Northwestern Queensland, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, e1083029. Cooke, B.N. (1999). Wanburoo hilarus gen. et sp.nov., a lophodont bulungamayine kangaroo (Marsupialia: Macropodoidea: Bulungamayinae) from the Miocene deposits of Riversleigh, northwestern Queensland. Records of the Western Australian Museum, Supplement Number 57. Travouillon, K.J., et al. (2014). Revision of basal macropodids from the Riversleigh World Heritage Area with descriptions of new material of Ganguroo bilamina Cooke, 1997 and a new species. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.17, Issue 1;20A. Subfamily incertae sedis Kear, B.P. and N.S. Pledge (2007). A new fossil kangaroo from the Oligocene-Miocene Etadunna Formation of Ngama Quarry, Lake Palankarinna, South Australia. Australian Journal of Zoology, 55. Subfamily Macropodinae - Kangaroos and Wallabies Anderson, C. (1929). Palaeontological Notes No.1. Macropus titan Owen and Thylacoleo carnifex Owen. Records of the Australian Museum, 7(1).Flannery, T.F. (1989). A new species of Wallabia (Macropodinae: Marsupialia) from Pleistocene deposits in Mammoth Cave, southwestern Western Australia. Rec.West. Aust.Mus., 14(3). Prideaux, G.J. and N. Warburton (2009). Bohra nullarbora sp.nov., a second tree-kangaroo (Marsupialia: Macropodidae) from the Pleistocene of the Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 25. Warburton, N. and G.J. Prideaux (2010). Functional pedal morphology of the extinct tree-kangaroo Bohra (Diprotodontia: Macropodinae). In: Macropods: The Biology of Kangaroos, Wallabies and Rat Kangaroos. Coulson, C. and M. Eldridge (eds.), CSIRO publishing. Subfamily Sthenurinae (†) - Short-faced Kangaroos Janis, C.M., K. Buttrill and B. Figueirido (2014). Locomotion in Extinct Giant Kangaroos: Were Sthenurines Hop-Less Monsters? PLoS ONE, 9(10). Prideaux, G.J. and R.T. Wells (1998). Sthenurus baileyi sp.nov., A New Fossil Kangaroo from the Pleistocene of Southern Australia. Trans.R.Soc.S.Aust., 122(1). Prideaux, G.J., et al. (2009). Extinction implications of a chenopod browse diet for a giant Pleistocene kangaroo. PNAS, Vol.106, Number 28. Family Potoroidae - Bettongs, Potoroos and Rat Kangaroos Archer, M. and T. Flannery (1985). Revision of the Extinct Giant Rat Kangaroos (Potoridae: Marsupialia), With Description of a New Miocene Genus and Species and a New Pleistocene Species of Propleopus. Journal of Paleontology, Vol.59, Number 6. den Boer, W. and B.P. Kear (2018). Is the Fossil Rat-Kangaroo Palaeopotorous priscus the Most Basally Branching Stem Macropodiform? Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, e1428196. Flannery, T. and M. Archer (1987). Bettongia moyesi, A New and Plesiomorphic Kangaroo (Marsupialia: Potoridae) from Miocene Sediments of Northwestern Queensland. In: Possums and Opossums: Studies in Evolution. Archer, M. (ed.), Surrey Beatty & Sons and the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales: Sydney. Wroe, S. (1996). An Investigation of Phylogeny in the Giant Extinct Rat Kangaroo Ekaltadeta (Propleopinae, Potoridae, Marsupialia). Journal of Paleontology, Vol.70, Number 4. Wroe, S., J. Brammall and B.N. Cooke (1998). The Skull of Ekaltadeta ima (Marsupialia, Hypsiprymnodontidae?): An Analysis of Some Marsupial Cranial Features and a Re-Investigation of Propleopine Phylogeny, With Notes on the Inference of Carnivory in Mammals. J.Paleont., 72(4). General Macropodiformes Burk, A. and M.S. Springer (2000). Intergeneric Relationships Among Macropodoidea (Metatheria: Diprotodontia) and The Chronicle of Kangaroo Evolution. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol.7, Number 4. den Boer, W. (2018). Evolutionary Progression of the Iconic Australasian Kangaroos, Rat Kangaroos, and their Fossil Relatives (Marsupialia: Macropodiformes). Ph.D. Dissertation - Uppsala University. (106 page comprehensive summary) Flannery, T.F., et al. (1992). The Macropodoidea (Marsupialia) of the Early Pliocene Hamilton Local Fauna, Victoria, Australia. Fieldiana Geology, New Series Number 25. Kear, B.P., et al. (2008). 2. Evolution of Hind Limb Proportions in Kangaroos (Marsupialia: Macropodoidea). In: Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology: A Tribute to Frederick S. Szalay. Sargis, E.J. and M. Dagosto (eds.), Springer Science + Business Media B.V. Llamas, B., et al. (2014). Late Pleistocene Australian Marsupial DNA Clarifies the Affinities of Extinct Megafaunal Kangaroos and Wallabies. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 32(3). Order Yalkaparidontia (†) Beck, R.M.D., et al. (2018). The Osteology and Systematics of the Enigmatic Australian Oligo-Miocene Metatherian Yalkaparidon (Yalkaparidontidae; Yalkaparidontia; ?Australidelphia; Marsupialia). J.Mammal.Evol. Marsupialia incertae sedis Godthelp, H., et al. (1999). A New Marsupial from the Early Eocene Tingamarra Local Fauna of Murgon, Southeastern Queensland: A Prototypical Australian Marsupial? Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol.6, Number 3. Family Numbigilgidae (†) Beck, R.M.D., et al. (2008). A Bizarre New Family of Marsupialia (Incertae Sedis) from the Early Pliocene of Northeastern Australia: Implications for the Phylogeny of Bunodont Marsupials. J.Paleont., 82(4). Family Stagodontidae (†) Carneiro, L.M. and E.V. Oliveira (2017). Systematic Affinities of the Extinct Metatherian Eobrasilia coutoi Simpson, 1947, a South American Early Eocene Stagodontidae: Implications for "Eobrasiliinae". Rev.bras.paleontol., 20(3). Cifelli, R.L. and J.G. Eaton (1987). Marsupial from the earliest Late Cretaceous of Western US. Nature, Vol.325, Number 6104. Clemens, W.A. (1968). A Mandible of Didelphodon vorax (Marsupialia, Mammalia). Contributions in Science - Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Number 133. Fox, R.C. and B.G. Naylor (2006). Stagodontid marsupials from the Late Cretaceous of Canada and their systematic and functional significance. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 51(1). Matthew, W.D. (1916). A Marsupial from the Belly River Cretaceous. With Critical Observations on the Affinities of the Cretaceous Mammals. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol.XXXV, Article XXV. General Marsupialia General Marsupialia - Africa/Middle East Krause, D.W. (2001). Fossil molar from a Madagascan marsupial. Nature, Vol.412. General Marsupialia - Antarctica Goin, F.J., et al. (2007). New Marsupial (Mammalia) from the Eocene of Antarctica, and the Origins and Affinities of the Microbiotheria. Revista de la Asociacion Geologica Argentina, 62(4). General Marsupialia - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Avarionov, A. and Z. Kielan-Jaworowska (1999). Marsupials from the Late Cretaceous of Uzbekistan. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 44(1). General Marsupialia - Australia/New Zealand Beck, R.M.D. (2012). An 'ameridelphian' marsupial from the early Eocene of Australia supports a complex model of Southern Hemisphere marsupial biogeography. Naturwissenschaften. Beck, R.M.D., et al. (2008). Australia's Oldest Marsupial Fossils and their Biogeographical Implications. PLoS One, 3(3). Black, K.H., et al. (2012). The Rise of Australian Marsupials: A Synopsis of Biostratigraphic, Phylogenetic, Palaeoecologic and Palaeobiogeographic Understanding. In: Earth and Life. Talent, J.A. (ed.), Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012. Dawson, L. (1985). Marsupial Fossils from Wellington Caves, New South Wales: the Historical and Scientific Significance of the Collections in the Australian Museum, Sydney. Records of the Australian Museum, 37(2). Dulhinty, J.A., T.F. Flannery, and J.A. Mahoney (1984). Fossil Marsupial Remains at the Southeastern Corner of Lake Eyre North, South Australia. Trans.R.Soc.S.Aust., 108(2). Godthelp, H., S. Wroe and M. Archer (1999). A New Marsupial from the Early Eocene Tingamarra Local Fauna of Murgon, Southeastern Queensland: A Prototypical Australian Marsupial? Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol.6, Number 3. Turnbull, W.D., E.L. Lundelius and M. Archer (2003). Chapter 18. Dasyurids, Perameloids, Phalangeroids and Vombatoids from the Early Pliocene Hamilton Fauna, Victoria, Australia. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Number 279. Wroe, S. (2003). Australian Marsupial Carnivores: Recent Advances in Palaeontology. In: Predators with Pouches: The Biology of Marsupial Carnivores. (M.Jones, et al., eds.) CSIRO Publishing. General Marsupialia - North America Cifelli, R.L. (2004). Marsupial Mammals from the Albian-Cenomanian (Early-Late Cretaceous) Boundary, Utah. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Number 285. Cifelli, R.L. (1993). Early Cretaceous mammal from North America and the evolution of marsupial dental characters. Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci., USA, Vol.90. Cifelli, R.L. and C. de Muizon (1997). Dentition and Jaw of Kokopellia juddi, a Primitive Marsupial or Near-Marsupial from the Medial Cretaceous of Utah. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol.4, Number 4. Davis, B.M. (2007). A revision of "pediomyid" marsupials from the Late Cretaceous of North America. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 52(2). General Marsupialia - South America/Central America/Caribbean Forasiepi, A.M. and G.W. Roughier (2008). Additional data on early Paleocene metatherians (Mammalia) from Punta Peligro (Salamanca Formation, Argentina): comments on petrosal morphology. J.Zool.Syst.Evol.Res., 47(4). Marshall, L.G. (1990). Fossil Marsupialia from the Type Friasian Land Mammal Age (Miocene), Alto Rio Cisnes, Aisen, Chile. Revista Geologica de Chile, Vol.17, Number 1. Patterson, B. and L.G. Marshall (1978). The Deseadan, Early Oligocene, Marsupialia of South America. Fieldiana Geology, Vol.41, Number 2. Sinclair, W.J. (1905). The Marsupial Fauna of the Santa Cruz Beds. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, Vol.44, Number 179. General Marsupialia Cifelli, R.L. and C. de Muizon (1998). Tooth eruption and replacement patterns in early marsupials. Earth & Plantary Sciences, 326. Cox, C.B. (1973). Systematics and Plate Tectonics in the Spread of Marsupials. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Number 12. Marshall, L.G. (1981). The Families and Genera of Marsupialia. Fieldiana Geology, New Series, Number 8. Meredith, R.W., et al. (2009). Relationships and Divergence Times Among the Orders and Families of Marsupialia. In: Papers on Geology, Vertebrate Paleontology and Biostratigraphy in Honor of Michael O. Woodburne. Albright, L.B. (ed.), Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 65. Nilsson, M.A., et al. (2004). Marsupial relationships and a timeline for marsupial radiation in South Gondwana. Gene, 340. Sanchez-Villagra, M.R. and K.K. Smith (1997). Diversity and Evolution of the Marsupial Mandibular Angular Process. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol.4, Number 2. Metatherians other than Marsupialia Oliveira, E.V. and F.J. Goin (2011). A Reassessment of Bunodont Metatherians from the Paleogene of Itaborai (Brazil): Systematics and Age of the Itaboraian Salma. Rev.bras.paleontol., 14(2). Order incertae sedis Maga, A.M. and R.M.D. Beck (2017). Skeleton of an unusual cat-sized marsupial relative (Metatheria: Marsupialiformes) from the middle Eocene (Lutetian: 44-43 million years ago) of Turkey. PLoS ONE, 12(8). Oliveira, E.V. and F.J. Goin (2015). A New Species of Gaylordia Paula Couto (Mammalia, Metatheria) from Itaborai, Brazil. Rev.bras.paleontol., 18(1). Family Jaskhadelphyidae (†) Oliveira, E.V., N. Zimicz and F.J. Goin (2016). Taxonomy, affinities, and paleobiology of the tiny metatherian mammal Minusculodelphis, from the early Eocene of South America. Sci.Nat., 103: 6. Order Sparassodonta (†) - South American Carnivorous Metatheres Family Borhyaenidae Carter, J.T. (1920). The Microscopical Structure of the Enamel of Two Sparassodonts, Cladosictis and Pharsophorus, As Evidence of Their Marsupial Character: Together With a Note on the Value of the Pattern of the Enamel as a Test of Affinity. Journal of Anatomy, Vol.LIV, Parts 2 & 3. Forasiepi, A.M. (2009). Osteology of Arctodictis sinclairi (Mammalia, Metatheria, Sparassodonta) and phylogeny of Cenozoic metatherian carnivores from South America. Monogr.Mus.Argentino Cienc.Nat., n.s., 6. (174 pages) Marshall, L.G. (1979). Review of the Prothylacininae, an Extinct Subfamily of South American "Dog-like" Marsupials. Fieldiana Geology, New Series Number 3. Simpson, G.G. (1941). The Affinities of the Borhyaenidae. American Museum Novitates, Number 1118. Family Hathliacynidae Carter, J.T. (1920). The Microscopical Structure of the Enamel of Two Sparassodonts, Cladosictis and Pharsophorus, As Evidence of Their Marsupial Character: Together With a Note on the Value of the Pattern of the Enamel as a Test of Affinity. Journal of Anatomy, Vol.LIV, Parts 2 & 3. Engelman, R.K., F. Anaya and D.A. Croft (2015). New Specimens of Acyon myctoderos (Metatheria, Sparassodonta) from Quebrada Honda, Bolivia. Ameghiniana, Vol.52(2). Forasiepi, A.M., et al. (2006). A New Species of Hathyliacynidae (Metatheria, Sparassodonta) from the Middle Miocene of Quebrada Honda, Bolivia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26(3). Marshall, L.G. (1981). Review of the Hathlyacyninae, an Extinct Subfamily of South American "Dog-Like" Marsupials. Fieldiana Geology, New Series Number 7. Family Proborhyaenidae Babot, M.J., J.E. Powell and C. de Muizon (2002). Callistoe vincei, a new Proborhyaenidae (Borhyaenoidea, Metatheria, Mammalia) from the Early Eocene of Argentina. Geobios, 35. Family Thylacosmilidae - South American Saber-toothed Metatheres Forasiepi, A.M. and A.A. Carlini (2010). A new thylacosmilid (Mammalia, Metatheria, Sparassodonta) from the Miocene of Patagonia, Argentina. Zootaxa, 2552. Marshall, L.G. (1976). Evolution of the Thylacosmilidae, extinct saber-toothed marsupials of South America. PaleoBios, Number 23. Quiroga, J.C. and M.T. Dozo (1988). The Brain of Thylacosmilus atrox. Extinct South American Saber-Tooth Carnivore Marsupial. Journal fur Hirnforschung, 29,5. Riggs, E.S. (1933). Prelimiary Description of a New Marsupial Sabertooth from the Pliocene of Argentina. Geological Series of Field Museum of Natural History, Vol.VI. Wroe, S., et al. (2013). Comparative Biomechanical Modeling of Metatherian and Placental Saber-Tooths: A Different Kind of Bite for an Extreme Pouched Predator. PLoS ONE, Vol.8, Issue 6. General Sparassodontans Croft, D.A., et al. (2017). Diversity and disparity of sparassodonts (Metatheria) reveal non-analogue nature of ancient South American mammalian carnivore guilds. Proc.R.Soc. B, 285: 20172012. Echarri, S., et al. (2017). Mandible morphology and diet of the South American extinct metatherian predators (Mammalia, Metatheria, Sparassodonta). Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Lopez-Aguirre, C., et al. (2017). Extinction of South American Sparassodontans (Metatheria): Environmental Fluctuations or Complex Ecological Processes? Palaeontology, Vol.60, Part 1. Wood, H.E. (1924). The Position of the "Sparassodonts": With Notes on the Relationships and History of the Marsupialia. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol.LI, Article IV.
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