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Found 7 results

  1. Hi! Back with more from the estate sale. I'm guessing this is a jaw section from a Titanothere? It appears to be, but I'm new to the ID game and want to be sure. The estate contained other smaller teeth that also look like Titanothere/Brontothere, but I don't have an exact location as to where it was found. There were many Stylemys turtles in there as well, and I've had those looked at by a paleontologist at SDSM&T and they said the turtles were likely found in the White River formation of the Badlands. Any help is appreciated. Thank you!
  2. Titantothere Teeth Repair

    Hi, I recently purchased some fossil titanothere teeth on eBay. I don't think the seller had ever sold or shipped a fossil before, when it arrived and I picked up the box it became immediately clear that it hadn't been packed well. When I opened it my worst fears were immediately confirmed. Lying there in a single piece of bubble wrap was my fossil in pieces . I'm hoping to repair it and I was thinking of using some plaster and paint certain parts black to repair it but people here are much more experienced than me and usually have better ideas then I do. Here are some photos:
  3. Titanothere Hunt

    This is a trip out to our leased fossil property to dig a Titanothere skull on 9/14/14… See more of this and my trip to the Northwest Nebraska Rock Club show and swap here: http://www.thecrawfordfossilmuseumandgallery.com/?page_id=369 Sorry, the link is fixed now...
  4. Here is my giant vertebra collection. I've had the lower 3 for a decent amount of time, some of you may have seen them before. But my new vert is the huge 1 foot whale found in barrow Alaska. My question is what part of the spine is it from? my guess is the neck, Thanks for looking! -Rylawz
  5. It's been a while since I posted a trip report. The past two weekends have found me out at the White River Fm in eastern WY. The first weekend was just a day... but I found some cool bones. Found a titanothere site. Looks like quite a bit of at least one animal had been here, but much of it has weathered away. After poking around the site, I found some broken tooth bits on the surface, and quickly realized it was a jawbone sticking out of the ground. Way cool. I have never found this many titanothere bones, or a jawbone. Wyoming had a very wet April and the area is greener than I have seen it in years. Beautiiful. Here is the road going in to the Ranch. The ranch has been sold, so the big sign I posted last year of the Ranch is no longer there. But here is a dirt road going towards the Seaman Hills. Here is the titanothere site I found near the end of the day. A vertebra is seen lying on the ground up close. There are titanothere bones all along this ridgetop and along the sides. The area in the black circle is full of titanothere bones, but those over there are really badly preserved. I had to beat a hasty retreat away from the rainstorm. But not before collecting a nearly complete vert and a rib. Here is the jawbone as exposed before I touched anything... a few broken tooth pieces and some bone showing. Last weekend I went back and brought my girlfriend along. She's new at this fossil game but did a great job. Despite the fact that she said early on..."Hey we have three days, can we go to South Dakota on the third day. I've never been to South Dakota". So, watch out, there will be a few pix from SoDak at the end. After a few hours of digging by Becky and me, here is what we had. Pretty cool, not just one jawbone, but a fused matched set, left and right and a really cool procumbent incisor. Here is the jaw. In case you can't see the teeh, in this next photo they are below the red lines. We are looking onto the chewing surfaces, more or less. And this shot shows the beautiful incisor. Here is Becky working real hard at pedestaling the jaws (she had a good teacher, I like to think). We plaster jacketed the thing and rolled it over. Here are a few action shots of that. Writing a label on the plaster. Ready to the roll it over. On the count of three... "ONE TWO FIVE Three sir" And fortunately nothing rolled out the bottom. And then we hauled it out. The site is behind the biggest badlands hill in the background. Becky took this picture from the car. It was about a 3/8 mile walk with a 150 pound rock. The dolly came in rather handy. And then we're off to South Dakota. Becky had never seen Mount Rushmore, and I also convinced her we should stop in at the Black Hills Institute in Hill City. You know, to see if they have a titanothere jaw on display. If you guys ever go through the Black Hills... gotta stop in Hill City. Great little museum. (Their titanothere jaw is much smaller than mine... hehe). And finally a collapsed old homestead on the Ranch at the base of the Seaman Hills.
  6. Okay, traded a couple of premium-grade teeth to a friend and ended up getting my dream fossil out of it: a Titanothere skull from Nebraska. So, now what? If anybody on here is well-versed in Titanotheres, can you help figure a genus? It would have been a little one, as the skull is about 2' long and the animal was very old when it died, indicated by the extremely worn teeth show. Nick
  7. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 14, 2018. Order Perissodactyla Family Lambdotheriidae (†) (may be basal brontotheres) Osborn, H.F. (1913). Lower Eocene Titanotheres. Genera Lambdotherium, Eotitanops. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XXXII, Article XXI. Smith, K.T. (2001). Reassessing the Lambdotherium first appearance datum (Wasatchian, early Eocene) in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. PaleoBios, 21(2). Family Brontotheriidae - (†) The Brontotheres (Titanotheres) Earle, C. (1895). On a Supposed Case of Parallelism in the Genus Palaeosyops. The American Naturalist, Vol.29, Number 343. Earle, C. (1892). A Memoir Upon the Genus Palaeosyops Leidy, And Its Allies. Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Vol.IX. (153 pages) Earle, C. (1891). Palaeosyops and Allied Genera. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Vol.43. Mader, B.J. (2010). A species-level revision of the North American brontotheres Eotitanops and Palaeosyops (Mammalia, Perissodactyla). Zootaxa, 2339. Osborn, H.F. (1913). Lower Eocene Titanotheres. Genera Lambdotherium, Eotitanops. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XXXII, Article XXI. Subfamily Brontotheriinae Holroyd, P.A. and R.L. Ciochon (2000). Bunobrontops savagei: a New Genus and Species of Brontotheriid Perissodactyl from the Eocene Pondaung Fauna of Myanmar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 20(2). Mihlbachler, M.C. and T.A. Demere (2010). Phylogenetic Status of Metarhinus pater (Brontotheriidae: Perissodactyla) from Southern California and Species Variation in Metarhinus from the Middle Eocene of North America. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(4). Stock, C. (1937). An Eocene Titanothere from San Diego County, California, With Remarks on the Age of the Poway Conglomerate. Proc.N.A.S., Vol.23. Wang, Y. and J. Wang (1997). A New Brontothere from Late Middle Eocene of Qufu, Shandong. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 35(1). Tribe Brontotheriini Burger, B.J. and L. Tackett (2014). The stratigraphic importance of the brontothere (cf. Diplacodon elatus) in the Brennan Basin Member of the Duchesne River Formation of Utah. Fossil Record, 17. Subtribe Brontotheriina Averianov, A., et al. (2018). A new brontothere from the Eocene of South China. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 63(1). Li, S. (2018). A new species of Brontotheriidae from the Middle Eocene of Junggar Basin, Xinjiang, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 56(1). Lull, R.S. (1905). Megacerops tyleri, A New Species of Titanothere from the Bad Lands of South Dakota. The Journal of Geology, Vol.13, Number 5. Mihlbachler, M.C. (2011). A New Uintan Horned Brontothere from Wyoming and the Evolution of Canine Size and Sexual Dimorphism in the Brontotheriidae (Perissodactyla: Mammalia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 31(1). Mihlbachler, M.C. (2007). Eubrontotherium clarnoensis, a new genus and species of brontothere (Brontotheriidae, Perissodactyla) from the Hancock Quarry, Clarno Formation, Wheeler County, Oregon. PaleoBios, 27(1). Mihlbachler, M.C. and T.A. Demere (2009). A New Species of Brontotheriidae (Perissodactyla, Mammalia) from the Santiago Formation (Duchesnean, Middle Eocene) of Southern California. Proceedings of the San Diego Society of Natural History, Number 41. Mihlbachler, M.C., S.G. Lucas and R.J. Emry (2004). The Holotype Specimen of Menodus giganteus, and the "Insoluble" Problem of Chadronian Brontothere Taxonomy. In: Paleogene Mammals. Lucas, S.G., K.E. Zeigler and P.E. Kondrashov (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 26. Osborn, H.F. (1896). The Cranial Evolution of Titanotherium. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.VIII, Article IX. Stock, C. (1938). A Titanothere from the Type Sespe of California. Proc.Nat.Acad.Sci. USA, 24(11). Stock, C. (1935). Titanothere Remains from the Sespe of California. Proc.Nat.Acad.Sci. USA, 21(7). Subtribe Embolotheriina Mihlbachler, M.C., et al. (2004). A New Brontothere (Brontotheriidae, Perissodactyla, Mammalia) from the Eocene of the Ily Basin of Kazakstan and a Phylogeny of Asian "Horned" Brontotheres. American Museum Novitates, Number 3439. Wang, B.-Y. (2000). A Skull of Embolotherium (Perissodactyla, Mammalia) from Erden Obo, Nei Mongol, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 38(3). General Brontotheres Granger, W. and W.K. Gregory (1943). A Revision of the Mongolian Titanotheres. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol. LXXX, Article X. Huang, X.-S. and J.-J. Zheng (2004). Brontotheres (Perissodactyla, Mammalia) from the Middle Eocene of Lunan, Yunnan. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 42(4). Mader, B.J. (2008). A species level revision of Bridgerian and Uintan brontotheres (Mammalia, Perissodactyla) exclusive of Palaeosyops. Zootaxa, 1837. Mihlbachler, M.C. and J.X. Samuels (2016). A small-bodied species of Brontotheriidae from the middle Eocene Nut Beds of the Clarno Formation, John Day Basin, Oregon. Journal of Paleontology. Mihlbachler, M.C. (2008). Species Taxonomy, Phylgeny, and Biogeography of the Brontotheriidae (Mammalia: Perissodactyla). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 311. (475 pages) Missiaen, P., G.F. Gunnell and P.D. Gingerich (2011). New Brontotheriidae (Mammalia, Perissodactyla) from the Early and Middle Eocene of Pakistan With Implications for Mammalian Paleogeography. Journal of Paleontology, 85(4). Osborn, H.F. (1929). The Titanotheres of Ancient Wyoming, Dakota and Nebraska - Vol.1. United States Geological Survey Monograph 55. (Note: may be read on-line or downloaded as a 79.3MB pdf file.) Osborn, H.F. (1929). The Titanotheres of Ancient Wyoming, Dakota, and Nebraska - Vol.2. United States Geological Survey Monograph 55 (Note: may be read on-line or downloaded as a 54MB pdf file.) Osborn, H.F. (1919). New Titanotheres of the Huerfano. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol.XLI, Article XV. Osborn, H.F. (1916). Two New Oligocene Titanotheres. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XXXV, Article XL. Osborn, H.F. (1908). New or Little Known Titanotheres from the Eocene and Oligocene. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XXIV, Article XXXII. Osborn, H.F. (1902). The Four Phyla of Oligocene Titanotheres.Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XVI, Article VIII. Stock, C. (1936). Titanotheres from the Titus Canyon Formation, California. Proc.Nat.Acad.Sci. USA, 22(11). Wilson, J.A. (1977). Early Tertiary Vertebrate Faunas, Big Bend Area, Trans-Pecos Texas: Brontotheriidae. The Pearce-Sellards Series, Number 25.
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