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Found 92 results

  1. Wowowow I was very surprised to find all this amazing stuff today at my favourite river bank fossils spot of the Etobicoke creek. I managed to snag a whole lot of stuff today, some Orthoconic Nautiloids, Brachipods and what I believe to be the nicest tentaculite I've ever seen!!! The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation and they were found in the broken up "rock fields" next to the creek. This is going to be one of my longer posts, so I will have to split them up into section. The full haul, with the typical estwing 22 ounce rock pick (33 cm from bottom of the handle to the top of the hammer end for anyone who doesn't own one). First lets start with the usual: Them cone boys, aka Orthoconic Nautiloids. I believe all of the following to be Treptoceras crebriseptum.
  2. Help in ID of unusual shaped fossil

    Hello, I recently cracked open a rock to find one the most pristine and unusually shaped fossils I've seen in a looong time. I predict it might be the edge of a bivalve shell poking out, but I wanted to know what others might have to say about this. It was found in the rock deposits of the rivers in Toronto, Canada, and is part of the Georgian bay formation. Also, only the bottom half seems to be completely crystallized and is translucent, whereas the top is relatively opaque: I am somewhat worried about totally ruining the fossil if I try to further crack into the matrix, as it is Ordovician era rock which is very hard and often results in the destruction of the specimen when trying to clean up the fossils. Sorry for not providing much to go off of . Thanks in advanced for the help! -Em
  3. Hello to all! Its been a very long time since I've been on here, but my recent trips around the creeks in Toronto, Canada (in the Etobicoke area) have yielded some of my largest and most defined finds of all time, here are some of the nicest Orthoconic Nautiloids I had found yet: Probably the nicest one in my collection at this moment, found almost completely by fluke when I hit a rock with my pick and this bad boy showed up Imprint made by the previous one These last couple would be way nicer, if only I could find a way to get it out of the rock matrix without completely destroying the specimen :/ ... Anyways, it good to be back and hunting this summer after a somewhat stressful finals season. I also have wayyyyyy more stuff that I found such as some unusually large and defined bivalves and tentaculites (maybe?), but I might save those for another time as they definitely weren't as cool as these ones. All were found along river rock deposits In the west side of Toronto (Etobicoke, Humber and Mimico creek) - Georgian Bay formation, excavated using rock pick and chisel.
  4. Don River

    Found this on the riverbank this afternoon with my daughter. She’s terribly excited and I have no frame of reference on whether or not this is a common find in the area or possible age. It’s treasure regardless. any ideas?
  5. Treptoceras crebiseptum

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    The smallest complete Treptoceras crebiseptum specimen in my collection. It even has the body chamber. Length is 10 cm long. Found in the shales of the Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member at Mimico Creek in Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada. Late Ordovician.
  6. Ichnofossil Association

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Ichnofossil association collected somewhere along the Humber River. Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. Late Ordovician. Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada.
  7. Bones upon bones

    Hi everyone, New to the forums, still getting the hang of this but started researching and doing a lot of reading on fossils. Finally found my first fossil with my 3 year old and we definitely need help identifying this item. Location: Toronto, Ontario ( Etobicoke Creek) This location is known to have orthoconic nautiloid - trilobites - bivalve- brachiopod Size : can see from the picture, the bone looking part is the size of a key Extra Info: it looks like there is two bones, one little one above the long one.. the upper small part looks like a bivalve Any advice of what this might be and the approximate age would be of great information to us. Thank you
  8. Hello there! I took advantage of the nice weather we've been having to visit Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) yesterday afternoon. Here are some photos of specimens that I'd like help identifying - perhaps @Tidgy's Dad would like to have a look? Firstly - the whole rock which contains the bryozoans and the unknown black objects: Specimen #1: a nice branching bryozoan - perhaps Homotrypa? Specimen #2: a nice encrusting bryozoan (there are actually two of them) - perhaps Mesotrypa? More to come...
  9. Whitby, ON Trilobites

    Took this opportunity to head to the shores of Lake Ontario in Whitby and find some trilobites, among other stuff! Edit: Kane corrected this - they're nautiloids. Cheers!
  10. scolecodont or conodont?

    Hi again! Over the weekend, I posted pictures of small fossils in a rock I found at Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). I've created this new post just for the shiny black specimens that I found in the rock because a consensus wasn't reached regarding their identity. Each of the two specimens pictured below are 5mm long. My question is: are these items scolecodonts or conodonts? I was leaning towards scolecodonts but I wanted to see what others have to say... Thanks once again! Monica
  11. Hi all! I ventured out to Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario today to look for fossils. It was very cold and the rocks were frozen together, but I managed to pry out one large rock that has some interesting fossils on it. The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Ordovician). The rock caught my eye because I could spot a few Cornulites flexuosus on one side, but after I brought it home and washed it, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the other side had even more interesting items on it! I'm not exactly sure of what I'm looking at, though, so I'm asking for your help. I'll tag @FossilDAWG since he's quite knowledgeable about fossils in my area Firstly, here's the whole rock so you can get an idea of the size of the fossils within the rock (i.e. they're generally quite small): Now on to the fossils! Here are some shiny black items that I've never seen before, but they look like scolecodont Oenonites sp. - what do you think? (I only circled the items that look sharp enough to be identified - the other black items I'm very not sure about!) Here are a couple of long, thin, and delicate-looking crinoid stems - can they be identified at all? Perhaps something like Ectenocrinus simplex (which does occur in the Georgian Bay Formation)? (The second one is located between the branching bryozoans which I think may be the bryozoan Homotrypa sp.) More to come...
  12. Old Mill, Humber River, Toronto

    Hi, I found this off Old Mill Rd., Toronto, near the Humber River. The subject is 4 cm long. I'd appreciate any help identifying it! Thank you, Bellamy
  13. Plant Fossil

    I went on my first fossil trip today. Firstly, I'd like to make sure this is actually a fossil; I spoke to someone experienced who mentioned it's probably a plant fossil. As for the ID itself. It's 8 cm x 3 cm x 1 cm. It was found in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, by the Humber River near Old Mill Station. I would appreciate any help confirming if this is a fossil, and maybe what it is. Thank you!
  14. Hi, This will be my first fossil-hunting trip. I'm from Toronto and have read a few threads mentioning that it's possible to find fossils along the Humber River. However, it's pretty long. I'm wondering if anyone could kindly offer suggestions on areas of the river they may have had success with. Thank you!
  15. Another trip to Etobicoke Creek, this time near Sherway Drive. There were lots of nice things, but quite the same as usual, so I concentrated on looking through the gravel for smaller pieces and ended up with a box of knick-knacks to explore. As usual, my wife found all the interesting items. At one point I picked up a rock and got surprised by a little snake. He was really steamed. We had a delightfully relaxing outing.
  16. A trip to Etobicoke Creek

    Yesterday I visited Etobicoke creek (west end of Toronto) which exposes the ordovician Georgian Bay formation. The creek was abundant with trace fossils and plates of preserved ripples, as well as small orthocone nautiloids.
  17. Shale fossil print

    Hello! I found this odd looking fossil the other day on a river bank in Toronto after splitting the shale. It seems to be possibly be a coal imprint of some sort. Not too sure what it might be. Let me know what you guys think: Thanks for the help!! -Em
  18. Hello fine fossil folks, I will be in Toronto this weekend (Friday night, Saturday night, leave Sunday) with my wife Visiting her aunts, uncles and cousins for a baby shower. Now that we are married they are my family too!! We go to Toronto pretty often now so I figured I’d better get used to some of the local geology/paleontology. Ive seen a few people post some nice Toronto trips. Anyone interested in getting out in the field this weekend? I don’t know when but I imagine my wife will tell me I can get lost for a few hours fossil hunting if I ask nicely . Hope to hear back! I’ll keep this thread going and add to it should I get out there collecting and decide to post the trip. Al
  19. ID for possible coral cross section

    Heyo! I had one more fossil I was looking to get an ID for and it looks to me like it might be a cross section of some kind of coral. It is rather faint so it might actually be nothing but I figured id give it a shot here as you guys are much better at ID than I am (until I catch up!) /\ Main pciture. /\ Here is a little closer showing the details. /\ Cross-section in case its needed. Thanks for help as usual, you guys are always great!! -Em
  20. Heyo! Found on the river banks of Humber river in Toronto, Canada I came across this rock this weekend and I was not sure if it was anything special or just a peculiar shaped rock. After some hesitation I decided to pick it up just in case. It has a very distinct wave looking shape to it and the texture on the 'wavy' surface seems rather fossil-esque but I wasn't sure as the cross section doesn't seem to show much of anything. If I had to take a guess I would say its either a coral or maybe its an imprint of some-kind? Let me know what you think If its anything worth keeping or just random rocks: /\ These two pictures show the general shape and size of the piece. /\ These two pictures show the close-up texture on the surface of both sides. /\ This is the side/cross section. Thanks for the help! -Em
  21. Hi all! I managed to go on 3 large fossil hunting trips this weekend and pulled in easily the BIGGEST haul so far with the most variety as well! The first two pictures were from Mimico creek and the rest were a mix of Humber river and a separate section of Mimico creek. I managed to pull in my second trilobite from the area so that was very exciting! Also pulled a bunch of stuff that I was not able to identify: /\ This was the haul from last Friday night /\ This is the trilobite I found!!! Very excited to have a second one - its been a while since the last one I found /\ This was the full haul for the weekend trip at Mimico and Humber /\ Some Orthoconic Nautiloids as usual. Although it seems that this isn't just the same species I usually find as some of the patterns were much smoother than what I usually find A couple decent looking Crinoid stalks /\ /\ Lots of different shells this time, with a nice range of lined shells as well as 'mussel' looking shells (don't know the scientific names for these ones yet - sorry :/) /\ A close-up of the real nicely defined deathbed of TONS of shells! Unfortunately the hammer I used for cracking bounced off this rock and mashed my thumb in so that wasn't very fun. But its healing up nicely so I'd say it was worth it haha /\ Variety different sizes of coral (if you guys could help me identify which type that would be sweet!) /\ These were the weird ones. I'm not even sure if these are even fossils but I figured I might as well take em just in case - better safe than sorry!! (I am posting these two in identification later!) I was very proud of this haul! Lots of diversity compared to the usual hunt which is nice because I'm kind of getting a little tired of the mountains of Nautiloids we have piling up in the collection Let me know what you guys think of these ones!!! -Em
  22. Toronto creek - big haul

    Location: Etobicoke creek, Toronto, CA Date collected: July 27th, 2019 Hello! I pulled in a whole bunch of fossils along the Etobicoke creek (a little bit further north compared to my last trip - almost same location though). LOTS of Orthoconic Nautiloids (as usual), a couple different bivalves and a few crinoid fragments. This is the nautiloid haul. The top right one doesn't look like much but there are about 5 or 6 nautiloids embedded in the matrix! I'm considering learning how to clean up the fossils so that I can show it off in all its glory! These are the bivalves and other stuff collected. These are two separate MASSIVE chunks of monster Nautiloids (~5cm in diameter) - hopefully I can clean this one up as it would make a veryyy nice shelf piece! Closeup on the full bivalve, I've never really found a complete bivalve with both shells in one clump like this before (correct me if its actually just a lame rock - I could be wrong). I thought this one was really interesting: notice the dark brown, lined layer just under the rocky outer layer? I've seen a good lot of Orthoconic Nautiloids but I haven't seen a layer like this before. Maybe its nothing but I thought it might be worth looking into - let me know if you guys have any info, or what you think! Anyways thats what I pulled in this past weekend! I'd say its a decent haul, not my nicest stuff but still a good lot. -Em
  23. Hello everyone! On Monday, I found a beautiful Treptoceras crebriseptum orthoconic nautiloid in a huge rock at Mimico Creek in the Etobicoke/Toronto area (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). It has been suggested that I might have a complete specimen, so I was hoping that someone out there might be able to let me know if this is the case or not. Here are some pictures... Whole specimen: Close-up of the base of the specimen (specimen has been turned over) - note that it is smoothly rounded and shows no septa - is this the fossilized living chamber of the animal? Close up of the tip of the specimen - note that it seems to end before the rock edge - is this the very tip of the animal? Close up of the piece that shattered off the tip of the specimen - note that it also seems to end before the rock edge: Thanks for your help!!! Monica
  24. Identifying lined protrusions fossil

    Hello! (Sorry in advanced for posting so much in the last few days, just discovered this community and I have so many unidentified fossils accumulated over the years!) We found some rocks on the side of a river in Toronto with weird looking protrusions and I honestly don't even know where to start with these ones, take a look: Thanks in advanced for your time (and paleontology skill)! -Em
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