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Found 63 results

  1. A 15cm fossil from "Nautiloid Alley" alongside the creek in Long Branch, Ontario. Also separate images from a "two-fer". For some reason, one sometimes encounters 2 or 3 close together in the same medium sized rock.
  2. Hi everyone, I found some interesting fossils/stones today, its around 8 cm each in length. Can anyone identify them? Thanks a lot!
  3. Fossil ID please

    Hi everyone, I found an interesting piece of stone today at a road construction site. May I ask if someone can tell me more about the possible species and age of this stone? Thank you very much!
  4. Hello everyone, I'm new to this forum and fossil hunt. I found a fossil in Toronto area near a road construction site. It looks like some kind of insect. May I ask if someone could identify the ID of this fossil for me please? Thank you very much!
  5. Ontario Ordovician conular items

    I've received a couple nice Upper Ordovician additions to my collection courtesy of @JUAN EMMANUEL and I'm finally posting them now... (Thanks Juan!) First, is this Tentaculites or Cornulites? I wish I could get better pics. Manitoulin Fm, Hamilton, ON.
  6. Hi guys, I visited Mimico Creek 2 days after the Canadian Thanksgiving this October which also happened to be a really hot day, which was perfect for exploring. During my time hunting the Georgian Bay Formation of Toronto I would come across these exposures that look “folded”. Does anyone happen to know as to what this really is? Here is a pic I took on that trip I mentioned to show as an example. I would find the same distortion in other parts of Toronto, not just in Mimico Creek, but also in places like along the Humber River and Etobicoke Creek.
  7. Rusophycus osgoodii

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Rusophycus osgoodii (author unknown). Found in the Humber River area, Etobicoke, Toronto, Ontario. Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. Late Ordovician. Trilobite burrow on a limestone with other trace fossils. Dime shown to show approximate size.
  8. Hello there! Yesterday, Roger @Ludwigia dropped by for a visit, and we spent the day together checking out my local haunts with Viola. The day started with some coffee and brownies, as well as lovely German gifts from Roger: a Macrocephalites sp. ammonite for Viola (I don't have a picture of it because it's up in her room) and a Brasilia bradfordensis ammonite with a hitchhiking bivalve on the back of the matrix for me!!! See pictures below: We then piled into my car and drove to our first spot: Mimico Creek in Toronto. The fossils here are from the Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Ordovician). Here's a picture of Roger and Viola checking out the site... And one of Roger wielding his hammer... Since I'm still nursing my "fossil elbow", I didn't want to hammer anything; instead, I scraped into the wall of rock and I'm happy to say that I found a couple of sweet little bivalves: one with its two valves partly open (too bad that it's not complete) and another one with some nice ornamentation visible on its shell... @Wrangellian - what do you think? Roger did a little exploring and found some fossiliferous rock further up the wall - I collected two fairly big pieces of this type of rock and, lo and behold, they contained a bunch of brachiopods and their imprints (along with some other goodies)... @Tidgy's Dad - I thought you might like to see them
  9. I found the first two of these pictures in the river bed of Etobicoke creek, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and the final picture is of one I found at the lakefront of marie curtis beach park. I have tried looking online and read they might be from ordivican? but I really have no idea! new to fossiling -- but definitely interested in learning more!
  10. Ordovician bryozoan

    I pulled this one out of a creek bed a couple weeks ago but cant narrow it down. Any ideas? Its from the Georgian Bay fm (Upper Ordovician) Forgot to add: the specimen is ~5cm/2 inches in length
  11. Hello all! Just like to ask if anyone can provide me some locations in/near Toronto, Ontario in Canada, of fossil sites free for the public to collect, that does not require hammering into rocks? Cuz I know of some quarries, but I have to hammer some rocks in order to find fossils. So what I'm saying, is that, whether there are places in Canada, where I can find fossils lying on the ground for me to pick up without any restrictions? Are there? Responses are appreciated, as always.
  12. Hello, I want to put together some pics of some of the reef material that I have found in Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario on the banks of the Credit River. It is now winter and I am missing the warm days in which I can go and wade in the warm waters of the river for fun. I just want to compile and share some specimens that whose photos I have not shared with. All the fossils belong to the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member, which is late Ordovician in age. First is the common coral that displays an enormity of growth forms, Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826).
  13. Lingulichnus verticalis

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Lingulichnus verticalis (Hakes, 1976). Humber RIver area, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Late Ordovician, Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. Oblong to tear shaped burrows made by linguliid brachiopod, species unknown. Approximately 15 cm across.
  14. Phycodes flabellus

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Phycodes flabellus (Miller and Dyer, 1878). Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. From the Humber River, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Late Ordovician burrows organized in a flabellate pattern. Approximately 10 cm across and in width.
  15. So today I was excited when this book came in. It is not in print anymore and I was lucky I managed to order this copy. It talks about the gastropods, cephalopods, and vermes of the Georgian Bay formation of Toronto, Ontario. It even has some nice detailed plates of what can be found in the formation. I never even knew vermes (worms?) can be found in the formation.
  16. Is this a bison tooth fossil?

    Hiya I just found this tooth it is 4cm long on the earth of a house Reno. My guess was a bison but we are in Toronto Canada not many bison here. How old is it? What mammal is it? Please help solve the mystery
  17. Toronto Conularia

    Conularia formosa (Miller and Dyer, 1878). Specimen with a positive and a negative counterpart (matrix). Found while smashing a limestone layer at Mimico Creek, Toronto, Ontario. The matrix of the Conularia has the negative on it, as well as bryozoan bits. Bibliography: Ontario. Department of Mines. The Stratigraphy And Paleontology Of Toronto And Vicinity.
  18. Lingulichnus

    Lingulichnus verticalis (Hakes, 1976). The elliptical shaped and concave burrows or holes were made by a linguloid brachiopod burrowing in the sediment. I took this plate home as I have never seen so many Lingulichnus burrows on one plate. Rock is limestone and was most likely mud before it lithified. Bibliography: Systematic Ichnology of the Late Ordovician Georgian Bay Formation of Southern Ontario, Eastern Canada, 1998, by D. Christopher A. Stanley and Ron K. Pickerill
  19. I found this crinoid head on a limestone that belongs to the Georgian Bay Formation, late Ordovician, today at the Humber River in Toronto, Ontario. Is this crinoid a Cincinnaticrinus or a Glyptocrinus? I have included a nickel for size reference.
  20. Endoceras proteiforme with Endocone Speiss

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Endoceras proteiforme (Hall, 1847) with a conical endocone speiss. Found in Mimico Creek, Toronto, Ontario. Georgian Bay Formation, Humber Member, late Ordovician, Katian. Length is approximately 2 feet long. This specimen is a fragment of the larger body.
  21. Yesterday on April 24 I decided to go and visit a place in Mississauga, Ontario called Streetsville which used to be a township of its own before being joined to Mississauga to form the City of Mississauga. I took public transportation to get there and it took me about 1.5 hrs to get there. I went to the Credit River near Streetsville and explored the banks. I had trouble finding a natural exposure as all I was finding were banks with worn out rocks and silt. The river's bottom does not have the same clarity as the Humber River in Etobicoke as I could not see the shale bottom of river. All I was seeing at the Credit's bottom were worn out rocks, algae and silt. The river was also wider than the Humber and in some places it seemed deeper as well which made me think twice about crossing to reach this natural exposure I found. The banks mostly had worn rocks but some nice material can be found. I was surprised at the fauna I found. The rocks are still part of the Georgian Bay Formation but the fossils are completely alien to my eyes. They were nothing that I usually encounter at the Humber River or at Mimico Creek. The place was littered with small coral bits and there lots of what appeared to be Tetradium bits. There also many brachiopod hash plates around. This hash plate here has a piece of coral at the bottom along with many brachiopod bits. There were some things familiar to me like that hash plate of bryozoans and I only found one cephalopod fragment. Where I usually hunt cephalopods are very common to find in Mimico Creek and at the Humber River. There were also these odd trace fossils lying around.
  22. Hello once again! Viola and I went to a new location for a little fossil-hunting this afternoon, and we think that she may have found a rough-looking trilobite - what do you think? We found it by Mimico Creek in Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). It's in a massive piece of rock so if it is indeed a trilobite then we'll have to find a way to cut the rock to save only her little treasure Thanks in advance! Monica
  23. Toronto Cephalopod Fossils

    Hi guys I just wanted to share some of the more interesting and unusual cephalopods that I've managed to amass over the past and nearly 4 years of hunting along the creeks and rivers of Toronto, Ontario. I was cataloguing them on my computer and I figured out that I might as well share them. The ones below all came from Mimico Creek. All the fossils belong to the Georgian Bay Formation, and are Late Ordovician in age. A Treptoceras crebispetum (author unknown) covered in an unidentified bryozoan. Length is around 15 cm. My first complete specimen and the same species as above. Complete ones like these found in the shale are often squashed. The body chamber is intact and the specimen approaches nearly 40 cm in length. The smallest complete specimen of the species that I have. This has the body chamber. Length is approximately 10 cm.
  24. What sort of Ordivician trace fossil

    Hi guys I found this trace fossil some days ago and I find this fossil a bit puzzling. I have no certainty as to what creature could have made this. This fossil is from Mimico Creek, Toronto, Georgian Bay Formation, Humber Member, late Ordovician.
  25. Conularia formosa

    From the album Urban Fossils of Toronto (Georgian Bay Formation, Lower Member)

    Found at Mimico Creek, Toronto, Ontario. Late Ordovician period. This specimen is a positive with a negative counterpart on limestone. This was also found along with a bunch of other Conularia specimens back in the end of Summer at 2015.
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