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Found 61 results

  1. A few Ordovician unknowns

    Here are a few fossils I recently collected from the Maquoketa Group (Upper Ordovician) in northern Illinois that I'm not sure about. 1) Maybe some kind of trace fossil? 2) The two things in question here are to the left and right of the pentagonal crinoid columnal. The small fossil on the left looks like it might be part of a trilobite genal spine? And the three-pointed fossil to the bottom right I have no idea about. I feel like I've seen something similar before but can't remember.
  2. pseudo fossil, starfish

    While walking back to the car I walked over this interesting specimen. I do not know if it is a pseudo fossil most likely, feeding trace of a star fish with lots of arms most unlikely. This comes from the toolebuc formation in central Queensland and is cretaceous. The item in question is 60 mm across. Any comments appreciated. Mike
  3. Here In Washington State! I purchased an estate with a 1925 Argentina Body & Trace fossil collection from a 1924-25 Meteor expedition, the collection has been sealed since 1935 and I am just now archiving the items with photos and as much information as I have. Although I was told all of the items were collected in the same area as the meteor, the specimens span over Millions of years (Billions if going by the estimated 4.5 Billion year old Meteorite) Ammonites at 409-66Ma to Ground Cherries at 52 Ma with the fruit fossilized and a few with showings of the husk at the tops. There are over 400 pieces so I've got a lot of work to do. I look forward to your comments as well as needed help with some of the loose items that are not easily ID (I know there are other species of fruits, nuts pictured below, this is what is next for me to archive)
  4. Deep-water trace fossils

    Hello friends! Today I'm seeking your help to identify a few fossils that I've found over the years. They are trace fossils and I collected them in northern Italy, along a creek. They were not in their original setting, but nearby outcrops dated to the Cretaceous or the beginning of the Caenozoic. These deposits were formed by the action of turbidity currents, in deep waters. If you have any idea for the ID, they are more than welcome! Thank you!
  5. If any one can or would answer a question for me. I am just curious if these trace fossils are of any value?. I will be honest this is something precious to me and my younger brother that found it. It's going to be in our family for many generations to come. This is special and priceless for many reading. The first being we found it on our family property that's been our family for generation. It was located at the very creek our 15 siblings and us have played in and spent all of our Sumner day's in since we was bigg enough to sit in water. This is a special place for our family. My father played their as a child. My grandfather's and his father played there as well. So I can't explain how much that piece of stone, rock what ever else it is means to us. If any one could help i would appreciate greatly. I am not asking for any figure or any thing of that nature. I just want to know if has value aside from the value we god for it.
  6. These tracks were made by a foot-long worm on a "death march" 550 million years ago. Newsweek, Sept. 4, 2019 (has pictures ) https://www.newsweek.com/ancient-worm-tracks-evolution-life-1457624 Barras, C., 2019. Ancient worm fossil rolls back origins of animal life. Nature, 573(7772), p.15. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02556-x https://www.nature.com/magazine-assets/d41586-019-02556-x/d41586-019-02556-x.pdf Chen, Z., Zhou, C., Yuan, X. and Xiao, S., 2019. Death march of a segmented and trilobate bilaterian elucidates early animal evolution. Nature, pp.1-4. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1522-7 Yours, Paul H.
  7. Just wanted to share the newest addition to my collection. An anchisauripus dinosaur track fossil, collected legally in Massachusetts.
  8. Is this rock considered a fossil

    So is this rock considered a trace fossil or a fossil at all? I am asking because I have seen similar rocks identified as fossils. Thanks.
  9. Help Me Out

    After a little research I think this is coprolite. Rock on one side and something that resembles poop on the other side. See next post for reverse side. Size is 1 1/4 inch by 3/4 inch by 1/4 inch
  10. I just came back from a surveying trip with some specialists from the museum this weekend, and naturally on the day after they left I happened to come across this oddball... It's really nothing like I've ever seen in the area before. The fossil itself is a piece of fragile lignitic wood inside a sandstone concretion, found in a thin layer of the late cretaceous marine Bearpaw formation associated with trace burrow fossils, and known to be deposited in a near-shore deltaic environment. Very well preserved, fragile lignitic wood is common, as well as other trace burrow fossils (you can see some in the concretion itself), which leads me to believe that these are infilled burrows of some kind (termites?). But I've never seen burrows in fossil wood that look like this, never mind in mud or any other substrate. They look to be too closely clustered together to be burrows, as in most substrates this would cause the walls between them to collapse. I know the chances are astronomically low, and that this almost definitely isn't the case, but this looks the most to me like some sort of fungal colony more than anything. Could it be a trace fossil of some kind of fungus or plant? I only have these photos from the field currently, as the specimen is currently jacketed, but I might have a chance to get some better photos either tomorrow or sometime later this week. (PS, I still find myself unable to upload any images to the forum. I get an error message that says, "The page you are trying to access is not available to guests, but may be available if you sign in.") View of concretion Note the lignitic wood still clinging to the top and bottom of the hollow once presumably filled by it. Left close-up Right close-up Some of the smaller "nodules"
  11. Strange Steinkern

    This is a steinkern of a fossil clam that I had purchased, the shell itself fell apart almost immediately and this was left. I just want to confirm that the things on the surface of it are some kinds of trace burrows from worms, I am not really sure but that is what they look like to me. Thank you all.
  12. Track traces?

    Found this slab at Jalama Beach, California on Saturday. It was quite different from all other blank pieces we found. Monterey Shale Formation, Miocene. Some of these prints look like bird tracks to me. Any insights?
  13. Kilkee Ireland

    Looking for help identifying what I believe are trace fossil found on the cliffs in Kilkee Ireland. The area is Upper Carboniferous if I am reading the map correctly. Any help would be appreciated.
  14. Scalarituba

    Nice example of Scalarituba found yesterday as float in NE Ohio. I would like others to confirm my identification. Thank you!
  15. I have heard that it's not uncommon to find examples of the ammonite placenticeras meeki with evidence of supposed mosasaur predation marks. A certain example of mine has since stood out as a possible contender. This example comes from deposits of the late Campanian Bearpaw Formation, a unit that is already well known for its good preservation of late Cretaceous molluscs, including placenticeras meeki with the supposed predation marks. I know that there are competing theories about the origin of these marks, including abrasion by limpets or other gastropods, so I'm curious about whether any of you are in agreement that this conspicuous pattern is evidence that this particular placenticeras was chomped by a mosasaur. A note about the specimen - I somewhat foolishly decided that a fine grain sandpaper was the solution for getting rid of the stubborn bits of sandstone matrix and pyrite that clung to the nacre, so most of the surface, including the rims of the matrix filling the puncture holes, is slightly polished. Also unfortunate is the fact that this ammonite, on account of most of the internal chambers being completely hollow, smashed into hundreds of little pieces once the concretion containing it was split. Fitting these fragments back together is essentially impossible, and I'm regretful that the specimen was ruined slightly by not being extracted carefully enough, but thankfully there's still a significant amount of it that's still intact. If anything, it seems to be telling that the only part of the fossil that isn't hollow (and therefore more durable) is where the puncture holes are, given that these holes would have allowed water and sediment to enter the chambers they had breached. The chambers which did not fill with matrix, on the other hand, could not handle the stress of the concretion being split, and shattered. Anyway, the first photo here shows the first two holes. These are on the left side of the ammonite. Note that the nacre around the punctures is cracked, where otherwise it is smooth and unblemished. The right side, showing the third puncture hole. It is difficult to tell in the photo, but this hole is depressed slightly into the ammonite. The bit near the end of the tape measure could also be a hole, but it's difficult to tell with so much pyrite encrusting it. Finally, a front-facing view. I've added arrows to approximate the location of the holes on either side. Note the preservation of the nacre of the septum, and how much of it is still covered by pyrite. Note that the other end of the fossil has no obvious septa, leading me to believe that this fragment is from near the body chamber. So, thoughts? I know that the origin of this type of trace fossil is still somewhat contested in paleontology, and I'm really curious about what the forum's consensus will be.
  16. Hi all, I have a pair of dino tracks. The left one is a Grallator sp. from the Connecticut River Valley. The right one is an Anomoepus scambus from Granby, Massachusetts. I've been trying to figure out their formation. I know they come from the Newark Supergroup. I would like to narrow it down. Do they come from the Portland Formation?
  17. Controversial fossils suggest life began to move 2.1 billion years ago. New Scientist, February 11, 2019 https://www.newscientist.com/article/2193557-controversial-fossils-suggest-life-began-to-move-2-1-billion-years-ago/ The paper is: Abderrazak El Albani, M. Gabriela Mangano, Luis A. Buatois, Stefan Bengtson, Armelle Riboulleau, Andrey Bekker, Kurt Konhauser, Timothy Lyons, Claire Rollion-Bard, Olabode Bankole, Stellina Gwenaelle Lekele Baghekema, Alain Meunier, Alain Trentesaux, Arnaud Mazurier, Jeremie Aubineau, Claude Laforest, Claude Fontaine, Philippe Recourt, Ernest Chi Fru, Roberto Macchiarelli, Jean Yves Reynaud, François Gauthier-Lafaye, and Donald E. Canfield, 2019, Organism motility in an oxygenated shallow-marine environment 2.1 billion years ago PNAS published ahead of print February 11, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1815721116 https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/02/05/1815721116 Yours, Paul H.
  18. Trace fossil? Bivalve borings?

    Okay, I had originally just thought this specimen was a 'mother nature playing games' kind of rock when I was out exploring on a day that turned out to be filled with lots of trace fossils. After some online research for Ordovician trace fossils I came across some Flickr photos for Petroxestes pera, bivalve borings, that were once called 'turkey tracks'. The particular photo panel labeled, Petroxestes pera bivalve borings on limestone hardground (Turkey Track Layer, Waynesville Formation, Upper Ordovician; Flat Fork Arm of Caesar Creek Lake, Warren County, Ohio, USA) , looks quite similar to the strange marks I found in this upper Ordovician formation here in southern NM. Any trace fossil turkey track experts willing to comment? Thank you in advance, Kato
  19. Found in my yard in Corpus Christi, TX.

    Was digging up a part of the yard with lots of chert scrapers we found and thought I saw something. Mud was wet so wasn't sure. After it dried I found these inside. Is this something or am Crazy?
  20. neo-ichnology!

    mardentomolichevo.1558-5646.2012.01743.x.pdf REANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCEINDICATE THAT THE EARLIEST TRACE FOSSIL OF A WINGED INSECT WAS A SURFACE-SKIMMING NEOPTERAN James H. Marden EVOLUTION/jan.2013 a re-examination of conclusions reached in the item below knechthexapodlagerstatt2b1cf335.pdf Late Carboniferous paleoichnology reveals the oldest full-body impression of a flying insect Richard J. Knecht, Michael S. Engel, and Jacob S. Benner PNAS,vol.108/16,2011
  21. Unknown trace fossil burrow

    Here is a fossil shell I found on a fairly recent trip to big Brook nj, towards the right there is a burrow that looks very straight and in the end of one some kind of dark conical figure is located, not sure what it is, any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
  22. Large cone/bowl shaped trace fossils.

    Cottowood Mbr, Beattie Fm, Council Grove group, Permian. Western Greenwood County, Flint Hills, Kansas. I've found 6 of these in only in this one place. They are most likely the interior molds of the actual trace. They were discovered over a period of several months. They were found as tumbled out, not in situ. I'm inferring what's top and bottom due to some obvious features and basic physics. Some retain what appears to be an original edge around the top. The top diameters range in size from 5" to 10+", with heights from 2" to 6". These were found in an area disturbed by oilfield work where it looks bulldozed out for some purpose. Geologically, the area may have intermittently been shallow or shoreline. I've done an amateur's inventory of fossils in the immediate area and found highest numbers are of very! small bivalves.
  23. Hello everyone. I'm a geologist/stratigraphist and I've been studying Missão Velha Formation (Araripe Basin, Brazil Jurassic-Cretaceous) for a couple of years. We found some structures that seem to be trace fossils, but as geologists, we assume ourselves to be slightly ignorant in ecologic behavior of species. The MV Formation are corsed sandstones, well stratified, with few purple siltic-sandstone levels with ped structures. These trace fossils I'll be presenting next resemble the top of one of these siltic-sandstone levels. They are tridimensional and cilindric, with an spheric edge on the bottom and the top is not well seen. It have sort of a stratification, like it was many piled up rings.
  24. Hello everyone, I am in desperate need of help with a huge debate I have been having with a friend over fossils preserved in ironstone concretions. From some of what I had read to some advice from other members I it possible to find vertebrate bone among shells and other mollusks preserved in an ironstone concretion. Whether it leaves a trace of the organism, morphs the organic material into the structure of the iron concretion through the decomposition with preserving, or whatever else it may be it seems to be possible. So recently I have hunted a place known to have recorded marine cretaceous shell and other mollusk found in ironstone concretion as well as cretaceous plants in shale, it seems like not to vast of enough study has been done there only from what I know, but since no vertebrate material had yet been discovered there though there can maybe be the possibility. I found these two particularly distinct pieces in iron concretions that exactly mimic the scute structure of soft shell turtle and croc in my opinion, I know how iron concretions are famous for leaving psuedofossils and such but these two pieces look way to exact and since its possible for shells and mollusks to preserve why not scutes? So I am here looking to end this debate, I'm looking for your opinion, can these be labeled as fossils, traces, etc? Or are these among some of the world's best iron concretions and nothing more. Your input especially if you are very experience in this subject would be tremendously appreciated.
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