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Found 43 results

  1. Trace fossil? Bivalve borings?

    Okay, I had originally just thought this specimen was a 'mother nature playing games' kind of rock when I was out exploring on a day that turned out to be filled with lots of trace fossils. After some online research for Ordovician trace fossils I came across some Flickr photos for Petroxestes pera, bivalve borings, that were once called 'turkey tracks'. The particular photo panel labeled, Petroxestes pera bivalve borings on limestone hardground (Turkey Track Layer, Waynesville Formation, Upper Ordovician; Flat Fork Arm of Caesar Creek Lake, Warren County, Ohio, USA) , looks quite similar to the strange marks I found in this upper Ordovician formation here in southern NM. Any trace fossil turkey track experts willing to comment? Thank you in advance, Kato
  2. Found in my yard in Corpus Christi, TX.

    Was digging up a part of the yard with lots of chert scrapers we found and thought I saw something. Mud was wet so wasn't sure. After it dried I found these inside. Is this something or am Crazy?
  3. neo-ichnology!

    mardentomolichevo.1558-5646.2012.01743.x.pdf REANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCEINDICATE THAT THE EARLIEST TRACE FOSSIL OF A WINGED INSECT WAS A SURFACE-SKIMMING NEOPTERAN James H. Marden EVOLUTION/jan.2013 a re-examination of conclusions reached in the item below knechthexapodlagerstatt2b1cf335.pdf Late Carboniferous paleoichnology reveals the oldest full-body impression of a flying insect Richard J. Knecht, Michael S. Engel, and Jacob S. Benner PNAS,vol.108/16,2011
  4. Unknown trace fossil burrow

    Here is a fossil shell I found on a fairly recent trip to big Brook nj, towards the right there is a burrow that looks very straight and in the end of one some kind of dark conical figure is located, not sure what it is, any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
  5. Large cone/bowl shaped trace fossils.

    Cottowood Mbr, Beattie Fm, Council Grove group, Permian. Western Greenwood County, Flint Hills, Kansas. I've found 6 of these in only in this one place. They are most likely the interior molds of the actual trace. They were discovered over a period of several months. They were found as tumbled out, not in situ. I'm inferring what's top and bottom due to some obvious features and basic physics. Some retain what appears to be an original edge around the top. The top diameters range in size from 5" to 10+", with heights from 2" to 6". These were found in an area disturbed by oilfield work where it looks bulldozed out for some purpose. Geologically, the area may have intermittently been shallow or shoreline. I've done an amateur's inventory of fossils in the immediate area and found highest numbers are of very! small bivalves.
  6. Hello everyone. I'm a geologist/stratigraphist and I've been studying Missão Velha Formation (Araripe Basin, Brazil Jurassic-Cretaceous) for a couple of years. We found some structures that seem to be trace fossils, but as geologists, we assume ourselves to be slightly ignorant in ecologic behavior of species. The MV Formation are corsed sandstones, well stratified, with few purple siltic-sandstone levels with ped structures. These trace fossils I'll be presenting next resemble the top of one of these siltic-sandstone levels. They are tridimensional and cilindric, with an spheric edge on the bottom and the top is not well seen. It have sort of a stratification, like it was many piled up rings.
  7. Hello everyone, I am in desperate need of help with a huge debate I have been having with a friend over fossils preserved in ironstone concretions. From some of what I had read to some advice from other members I it possible to find vertebrate bone among shells and other mollusks preserved in an ironstone concretion. Whether it leaves a trace of the organism, morphs the organic material into the structure of the iron concretion through the decomposition with preserving, or whatever else it may be it seems to be possible. So recently I have hunted a place known to have recorded marine cretaceous shell and other mollusk found in ironstone concretion as well as cretaceous plants in shale, it seems like not to vast of enough study has been done there only from what I know, but since no vertebrate material had yet been discovered there though there can maybe be the possibility. I found these two particularly distinct pieces in iron concretions that exactly mimic the scute structure of soft shell turtle and croc in my opinion, I know how iron concretions are famous for leaving psuedofossils and such but these two pieces look way to exact and since its possible for shells and mollusks to preserve why not scutes? So I am here looking to end this debate, I'm looking for your opinion, can these be labeled as fossils, traces, etc? Or are these among some of the world's best iron concretions and nothing more. Your input especially if you are very experience in this subject would be tremendously appreciated.
  8. Good afternoon everybody! During a fieldtrip in Silesia (Poland) last year I visited a rather large spoiltip looking for plant fossils. The spoils left behind by the mining company indicate they still use (or used) the old method to separate the coal from the surrounding debris, allowing the coal to be 'baked' (e. g. the presence of pyrite that turns into sulphuric acid -h2so4- under the influence of wind and rain, ...) something typical for the majority of spoiltips I visited in Western Europe. Unfortunately I have no detailed geological data on the age of the debris in the spoiltip but there is no doubt this is Silesian (upper Carboniferous) in age. I even tend to think this is Westphalian in age based on the fossils found, but let's keep it to upper Carboniferous to be sure. I found several species of Lepidodendron, some Eusphenopterids, both Stigmaria ficoides and S. stellata, etc... And this never-seen-before 'thing'. My initial thought was that this could be some sort stem/branch but, in my 20 years of collecting Paleozoic plants, I have never seen the repetative triangular pattern that covers the branch (or tube if you like). Perhaps this could be some sort of tracefossil? Since my ichnofossil-knowledge is extremely limited someone here can help me out? The height of the 'tubes' varies between 2 and 3mm. Have a nice day! Sven
  9. Hi all, I recently have found trace fossils called Rhizocorallium. It is possibly from the feeding burrows of a Crustacean, annelid type creature. Found in the ~90 million year old marine shallow seas of the Cretaceous period contact between the Austin chalk and Eagleford shale formations. These are very small ones. From the Martin Marietta cement quarry phosphate layer siftings.
  10. Small Footprint

    From the album FreeRuin's Finds

    Either a small footprint or a partial one I believe it to be a Grallator due to its shape and size. Picked it up while hiking. Hartford Basin Portland Formation Massachusetts
  11. Enigmatic Ammonite Eggs (?)

    Hey all: For your consideration and expertise, an ammonite partial collected by the poster's parent has some interesting features. I don't know the exact formation of origin, but within the Rio Puerco river valley known to be Cretaceous period. I'm posting the best images I have at the moment, which, in addition to the partial with the scale cube (lower ammonite partial), are my attempts at using a smart phone to shoot down the dissection scope tube with the ocular removed...It's the best I can do at the moment. In question are the egg like features you can see on the partial. Most ammo eggs I have seen are spherical and not bacilli-like. The black dots are lichens that are commonly found in area rocks, usually in small crevices that trap dew. Thoughts?
  12. Trace Fossil Help

    Found these beauties in my neighborhood on a sidewalk I've walked over for about 15 years... Any ichnologists out there? I'm thinking Cosmoraphe, but I'm a bit out of my depth.
  13. Hi all, I was wondering: would the steinkern of for example a Turritella be considered a fossil or an ichnofossil? Because in fact, the shell itself didn’t become a fossil, and what we are looking at is just sediment that filled in the shell and then solidified. But then again I’ve never heard of a steinkern being referred as an ichnofossil... So what do you guys think: really a fossil, or just a trace fossil? I am curious to see everyone’s opinion Best regards, Max
  14. Possibly bioturbated sandstone?

    I've been adventuring my family property in north-western Pottawatomie county, Oklahoma, for 15 years or so and I've always thought all this sandstone was kinda boring - there didn't seem to be any obvious strata, or differences in composition and no fossils. On Christmas day, however, I went out on the family property to do a bit of photogrammetry of the sandstone outcrops on the property and I stumbled upon a very interesting pattern in the sandstone: I have been told that it looks like bioturbated sandstone, and it certainly looks like some kind of biological pattern. This sandstone belongs to the garber formation in central Oklahoma, and is Permian in age. This is the only place I've seen such a pattern anywhere around here. Is anyone familiar with the garber sandstone or perhaps with similar formations/trace fossils?
  15. Trace in the Round Set

    From the album Starting at the Beginning

    Beach finds I'd kept prior to becoming truly interested and adopting this as a hobby all surrounding a trace fossil that was one of a handful of pieces found 4 months ago that turned me into a rock netd
  16. Trace in the Round Set

    From the album Starting at the Beginning

    Beach finds I'd kept prior to becoming truly interested and adopting this as a hobby all surrounding a trace fossil that was one of a handful of pieces found 4 months ago that turned me into a real rock nerd! I liked how they look as a set, so I framed them and hung them on my wall.
  17. Hello, this is a part 2 of my last thread with some of my other finds that I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if these are footprints of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  18. Hello, I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if this is a footprint of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  19. What is name of the trace fossil?

    Hellow Guys, I have the doubt, the trace fossil of the picture is a rhizocorallium, diplocraterion or taenidium? Or none of those three?
  20. Help with St. Leon, Indiana ID's

    I was hoping that someone on the forum could help with the ID of 2 items that I found earlier in the year at the St. Leon road cut. The first is a nice hash plate that contains something that I believe might be a portion of an Isotelus trilobite- it does not have the shape of a brachiopod and is larger than any brachiopod that I have found there. I also believe that the 2 pieces would connect if not for the matrix between them.
  21. Black shale oddity, any ideas?

    I went down to a new spot i found to see if i could find more Carboniferous shark teeth. Sadly, no teeth. But i found this oddity. I've personally have never seen anything like it, and it kind of reminds me of shark skin, but i'm leaning more towards a strange trace fossil. In the upper right corner and top center you can see symmetry somewhat in the shape i can only describe as a sunflower shape. Other than that the spots seem random. Any opinoins are welcome. I've been searching and searching without any luck. Thanks, guys and gals This is Carboniferous black shale.
  22. Found this at a Southern Oregon Beach- its a full three-toed-foot print- in amber. One of the claws to whatever stepped in it got stuck in the amber as well- and there is a tiny hole in the amber you can look into and see the end of said claw. I've done a breif search and have found very very little when it comes to amber and trace fossils- and in sense lead me to post this to see other opinions.
  23. Some kind of trace fossil?

    Hello all, I found this piece about a couple months ago while searching for dinosaur prints in cretaceous siltstone. I'm not sure what it is, it is raised and could potentially be some type of depositional feature or erosion pattern. What do you think?
  24. Coprolite

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    Coprolite bought at store. From Madagascar. I assume turtle.
  25. Strange trace fossil (?) from Texas

    I found this in Texas, east of San Antonio, near Garden Ridge. It came from Cretaceous strata (Edwards ls., Del Rio clay, or Buda ls.). The matrix is a soft chalky tan-colored limestone. I think it's a trace fossil. It broke apart on transport/recovery, so I reassembled the sections I could. It also had what looks like a bivalve shell associated with it at one end, and a small 2-cm-long tube-like cast. The main fossil is a long flattened tube(?) or tunnel(?), with a very elliptical cross-section: 15 mm wide, 5 mm thick. It has two narrow ridges that run the length of the fossil on one side. Total length, if you reassembled it all together, is about 28 cm. Thanks for any ideas -- this one I have no idea about. I'm pretty sure it's a trace fossil -- a tunnel, burrow, or filled-in depressed track? Thanks, Bob The whole fossil: Note the two narrow longitudinal ridges. Bivalve(?) shell and small tube Lengthwise view. Shell?
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