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Found 58 results

  1. I have found scattered limestone clasts with submillimeter holes in them. I pick them up wondering if they are stromatoporoids, bryozoans, sponges or the like. The holes do not extend into the interior of the rock. Some of the rocks have lichen and algae growing on them. I finally found a soft dark lichen or algae growing in the holes in the rocks. Let me know if anyone can tell whether the dark spots are lichen or algae. If they are the cause then the rock exhibits bioerosian. Bioerosian was first described by Conrad Neumann in 1966 as “the removal of consolidated mineral or lithic substrate by the direct action of organisms.” The organisms probably secrete acid that dissolves limestone. Algae and lichens were early colonizers of the land. Bioerosian created soil that allowed new forms of life including plants and trees to colonize the land. Check your limestone rocks for these traces of bioerosian. Theoretical these could become trace fossils if buried for more that 10k years. Photos show holes in Tertiary limestone with plant fossils that are from 0.2 to 0.4 mm in diameter. Again, if you know what the black organism is let me know. https://aslopubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4319/lo.1966.11.1.0092 OBSERVATIONS ON COASTAL EROSION IN BERMUDA AND MEASUREMENTS OF THE BORING RATE OF THE SPONGE, CLIONA LAMPA by Conrad Neumann.
  2. Went to Joshua Creek near Mississauga and got bitten by Mosquitoes! This creek yields its treasures very reluctantly. I looked at hundreds of rocks and brought back only six. One is an 'X' shaped burrow. Another has a bunch of wavy ridges through several layers which I presume are either geological or maybe fossil algae that is new to me. Also got a few 'bumpy' bryozoans, which I have taken to calling 'Parvohallopora' until I can figure out what they really are in Georgian Bay formation. Much of the area was packed with trace fossils...intensely detailed, but boring and with no sign of shells or any fossil life forms. The layer can be observed in place, extending for hundreds of meters, with nothing but burrows and little globs. At one point I found, to my surprise, that the broken shale pieces were pressed against a Queenston formation layer with their detailed surface against the flaky shale. That was surprising and unintuitive to me. I visited my traditional tiny outcrops, one with lampshells and the other with large branching bryozoans (flip side of a layer with large wave ripples). Fossil buddies were: toad, frog, cardinal, and 2 woodpeckers.
  3. Hi all, Once again we are back from a weekend of fossil sleuthing in south eastern Arizona south of Tucson. The Upper middle cambrian Abrigo formation is mostly limestones, but the lowermost member is either a dark grey shale, or green glauconitic micaceous shale. Gorgeous stuff! Three main localities were visited - the 80/90 Roadcut (mostly trilobits and brachs), Ajax Hill near Tombstone (trilobits), and and area near Colossal Cave just south of Tucson. (tons of trace fossils). Trace fossils are very abundant in both the Abrigo Formation and the slightly older Bright Angel Shale in northern Arizona. Nearly all trace fossils found were in a micaceous glauconitic green shale, in isolated beds found throughout the Abrigo, especially in its lowest beds. The most commonly found types were from sediment ingesting worms, with a number of disks and rings from stemmed Echinoderms where they attached to the sediments. Also found were the attachment depressions of solitary and colonial cnidarians. Years of searching did not however reveal any trilobite tracks or traces. This was surprising since there are so many trilobite fossils in the Abrigo. Most fossils are in a single bed or plane and represent variations on Planolites, or Paleophycus. Another surprise was that no Skolithos was found either. This seems to indicate we are in a deeper water environment rather than near shore like the Tapeats or Bolsa sandstones. Collecting of the shales was pretty easy. Most were in big piles at the bottom of small cliffs, and often did not have to be split. Nearly all were on the bottom of the slabs (positive hyporelief) and you had to flip over the slab to see what was on the bottom. Here is a representative selection of fossils we have found at the three sites. Paleophycus Hold fast traces of a stemmed echinoderm, possibly Gogia. Bergauaria - A prize find. dozens of Cnidarian (sea anemome) suction cup marks can be seen clustered in a group on this former hardground. Thanks for looking. we put together a far more extensive write up if your interested on our paleo web site, please visit for more exciting specimens: http://www.schursastrophotography.com/paleo/Abrigo-6.html Chris
  4. Fossil footprints found in Sydney suburb are from the earliest swimming tetrapods in Australia by Phil Bell, University of New England https://phys.org/news/2020-05-fossil-footprints-sydney-suburb-earliest.html Roy M. Farman et al. Australia's earliest tetrapod swimming traces from the Hawkesbury Sandstone (Middle Triassic) of the Sydney Basin, Journal of Paleontology (2020). DOI: 10.1017/jpa.2020.22 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/australias-earliest-tetrapod-swimming-traces-from-the-hawkesbury-sandstone-middle-triassic-of-the-sydney-basin/2C787D68A8F2F300B2111A0E68E5981C Yours, Paul H.
  5. Trace fossils or water residue?

    So- been starting to look for my first conodonts in black shale in the Kansas City area and I commonly see what appears to be mineral deposits left when water seeps through layers, then dries, but these are in winterset limestone (as best I can tell) and while they look similar, maybe these are trace fossils? thanks for taking a look! Bone
  6. Devonian Burrows? Fish Poo?

    ID help please! I recently found these strange features in a Devonian rock in Johnson County, Iowa. They are unusual looking enough that I suspect an animal may have been involved in their formation. My first guess was that they were burrows that had filled in with dense crinoid and shell debris, but I'm not sure how that would happen. My second guess was that it could be poop/coprolite from a fish or some other Devonian creature. I didn't have a scale with me, but these would be very large for fish poop. I will post another photo in a separate post below (files are too big). I would be very grateful for any assistance, thank you! Here is a link to a video that may also be helpful:
  7. Trace Fossils from Miocene Potomac

    Hi, longtime lurker first time poster here. I was wondering if you guys can help me ID this concretion my family found years ago near Calvert. I believe it might be a trace fossil of some kind, possibly a burrow or tunnel. I have found similar types at Westmoreland State Park. I can upload pictures from different angles if needed. Any suggestions of what it could be?
  8. Had a great day getting out this weekend and exploring some cretaceous clay outcroppings along the creek bed. Lots off impressions of shells but other interesting things that I don't recognize. Are they anything other than erosion patterns? I have more photos if needed. Thank you! ay ge I think the top is some type of shell but what about underneath?
  9. Jurassic Trace Fossils

    Here's some pictures of Trace fossils from early Jurassic of Western Himalaya. I'm curious if anyone knows what the proper name should be if not "Thalassinoides". Thanks in advance
  10. Several months ago a speaker at a Dallas Paleontological Society general meeting gave a talk that included information about research into the remains of urine spatters left by large herbivorous dinosaurs which had been recently identified. I don't remember who it was, when it was or even the general topic of the talk but I would like to know what the scientific name is for these trace fossils if anyone knows.
  11. Givetian fossils from Poland

    Hello, I have found these during my recent trip to Wymysłów and Śniadka, two locations in Poland with middle Devonian fossils of the Świętomarz Beds. The ones from Wymysłów seem to be some kind of trace fossils:
  12. Deep-water trace fossils

    Hello friends! Today I'm seeking your help to identify a few fossils that I've found over the years. They are trace fossils and I collected them in northern Italy, along a creek. They were not in their original setting, but nearby outcrops dated to the Cretaceous or the beginning of the Caenozoic. These deposits were formed by the action of turbidity currents, in deep waters. If you have any idea for the ID, they are more than welcome! Thank you!
  13. Sun was in abad position unfortunately but I’m curious if you think these are just random marks or something else? The top picture marks are about 8” total. The bottom two with the sets of four are about six inches square per set, on a huge boulder. As always, value your input!
  14. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2215291-540-million-year-old-worm-was-first-segmented-animal-that-could-move/?utm_campaign=RSS|NSNS&utm_source=NSNS&utm_medium=RSS&utm_content=news https://www.courthousenews.com/scientists-uncover-550-million-year-old-fossils-of-bug-trails/
  15. I made a trip today to Albion Falls in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada by public transportation. Albion Falls is a classical waterfall that cascades over the Niagara Escarpment in Hamilton, Ontario and is 19 metres high. The waters flow north along the Redhill Valley as Redhill Creek to empty to Lake Ontario. Once a popular tourist destination, climbing up the waterfall is not allowed anymore due to paramedics having to rescue irresponsible tourists who have hurt and died from slipping and falling. I mostly ended up checking out the Grimsby Formation which is nicely exposed near the waterfall. There are walls of exposure as the water meanders down from the falls, revealing nice explorable spots. The Grimsby Formation is part of the Cataract Group and dates to the early Silurian period. The Grimsby Formation is not popular as it is not fossiliferous. I’ve had better luck finding fossil animals in the Manitoulin and Cabot Head Formations at the Devil’s Punchbowl in Hamilton, Ontario. The reddish maroon bottom part of the exposure is the Grimsby Formation. It is mostly red/purple shale mixed with the same coloured sandstones. Here is a pic showing how the Cabot Head Formation of the Cataract Group progresses into the Grimsby Formation.
  16. Lithoredo abatanica, below article, should have left some interesting trace fossils in the rock record. This Weird Animal Eats Rocks for Breakfast By Laura Geggel, LiveSciecne, June 19, 2019 https://www.livescience.com/65739-newly-discovered-clam-eats-rocks.html It would be a nightmare as an invasive species. The open-access paper is: Shipway, J.R., Altamia, M.A., Rosenberg, G., Concepcion, G.P., Haygood, M.G. and Distel, D.L., 2019. A rock-boring and rock-ingesting freshwater bivalve (shipworm) from the Philippines. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 286(1905), p.20190434. – Open Access https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2019.0434 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31213180 Yours, Paul H.
  17. neo-ichnology/actuopaleontology

    DUN Bibliographic reference: Dundas, K., and Przeslawski, R., (2009). Deep Sea Lebensspuren Biological Features on the Seafloor of the Eastern and Western Australian Margin. Geoscience Australia Record 2009/26, 76 pp. 20,3 MB/RECOMMENDED! Attention: if your eyes start to water when regression analysis and statistics are mentioned ,skip this one
  18. The below paper is an interesting reinterpretation of the depositional environment of the Birket Qarun Formation of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Wadi Al-Hitan, also known as either Valley of Whales or Zeuglodon Valley, in the Western Desert of Egypt. The paper is: Gee, C.T., Sander, P.M., Peters, S.E., El-Hennawy, M.T., Antar, M.S.M., Zalmout, I.S. and Gingerich, P.D., Fossil burrow assemblage, not mangrove roots: reinterpretation of the main whale-bearing layer in the late Eocene of Wadi Al-Hitan, Egypt. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, pp.1-16. The PDF file is at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326955395_Fossil_burrow_assemblage_not_mangrove_roots_reinterpretation_of_the_main_whale-bearing_layer_in_the_late_Eocene_of_Wadi_Al-Hitan_Egypt https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Sander2 The abstract is at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12549-018-0337-0 Yours, Paul H.
  19. Marine Fossil Id Needed

    I found these fossils about a week ago next to Settlement Canyon Reservoir (Tooele County, Ut). I found them about 6600 feet up in elevation at about 1/5 mile away from the reservoir. The images are of the same rock but taken at different angles and sides, all except the last picture.
  20. Due to lost climbing experience I had made a failed approach into an escarpment canyon climb last year. A few months later with skills rebuilt I decided to tackle one of the canyons on the east side of Alamogordo, NM again. The escarpment rise fairly abruptly from the trailhead. Approximately 1,100 feet in 1.3 miles to the highest point of the walkabout. This summary will include some pics from my earlier failed attempt. My goals...to visit a unique looking mud mound, find fossils and get away from it all. One the way up the canyon bottom I spotted this ghostly apparation in an exposed slab. Halycite? The main geologic feature of interest was this formation called 'Teepee Mound'. Look to left side of formation for teepee The geologists summary of what is going on My approach was to continue far up canyon to a higher altitude then cut back west to approach the teepee shape. About midway up the teepee shape from the east looking back to the basin. These formations were thick with crinoids. The teepee actually seemed to be suspended by columns of material. Likely supporting material leached away over the years by water.
  21. "Himalayan Fossils"

    Hey fossil friends! I purchased these fossils a couple years ago from a local gem shop. Unfortunately, all I know about them is that they were labeled "Himalayan fossils" and are quite heavy. One appears to be an impression of an ammonite but I'm not sure what the other is, or if they are genuine. Any help appreciated, thanks!
  22. Ireland trip

    The scenic east coast of Ireland has circa 320 mya outcrops. We found coral fossils around a lake near Sligo. The Liscannor Flagstone trace fossils and what looks like coral, top center, in the steps at Cliffs of Moher:
  23. 600 Million Years Ago, the First Scavengers Lurked in Dark Ocean Gardens, By Asher Elbein, New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/30/science/ediacaran-period-predators.html The bizarre organisms of the Ediacaran Period have long puzzled researchers. Fossil discoveries suggest these ecosystems may have been more complicated than once thought. The paper is: James G. Gehling, Mary L. Droser, 2018, Ediacaran scavenging as a prelude to predation. Emerging Topics in Life Sciences. 2 (2) 213-222; DOI: 10.1042/ETLS20170166 http://www.emergtoplifesci.org/content/2/2/213 Yours, Paul H.
  24. trilobite evolution

    "It seems likely that trilobites were preceded by soft-bodied ancestors: at several localities, sedimentary rocks with trace fossils of trilobite activity underlie the oldest rocks with trilobite body fossils." From http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/arthropoda/trilobita/trilobitafr.html Hello all, I'm looking for papers that support or dispute the above standard line about trilobite ancestors likely having soft bodies. I searched the forum but tags such as "soft body" produces papers that refer to the soft bits of hard bodied trilobites; not true soft bodied trilobites. One or two papers, if you know of any, would be sufficient to get me on my way. Also, if anyone has thoughts about this subject, I would love to hear them. It is bothersome (at least to me) that these creatures seem to have no connection to the Proterozoic.
  25. Hello everyone, I am in desperate need of help with a huge debate I have been having with a friend over fossils preserved in ironstone concretions. From some of what I had read to some advice from other members I it possible to find vertebrate bone among shells and other mollusks preserved in an ironstone concretion. Whether it leaves a trace of the organism, morphs the organic material into the structure of the iron concretion through the decomposition with preserving, or whatever else it may be it seems to be possible. So recently I have hunted a place known to have recorded marine cretaceous shell and other mollusk found in ironstone concretion as well as cretaceous plants in shale, it seems like not to vast of enough study has been done there only from what I know, but since no vertebrate material had yet been discovered there though there can maybe be the possibility. I found these two particularly distinct pieces in iron concretions that exactly mimic the scute structure of soft shell turtle and croc in my opinion, I know how iron concretions are famous for leaving psuedofossils and such but these two pieces look way to exact and since its possible for shells and mollusks to preserve why not scutes? So I am here looking to end this debate, I'm looking for your opinion, can these be labeled as fossils, traces, etc? Or are these among some of the world's best iron concretions and nothing more. Your input especially if you are very experience in this subject would be tremendously appreciated.
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