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Found 50 results

  1. I have these fossils here from the early Jurassic, Northamptonshire. I was wondering if the one on the left could possibly be a coprolite, or some other fossil, although most likely not. It does stick to the tounge. I also have these bumps on bits of rock, and was wondering if they could possibly be due to bivalves? And lastly, a slightly curved thing that has equal thickness which I have no clue what it is. Many thanks
  2. Zoophycos?

    Hey all. Found this sort of trace fossil I'm assuming, in some shale shelves. My initial thought was Gryphaea but it lacks the proper lines and structure to be a shell. Now I'm leaning towards Zoophycos. Can anyone confirm if it is zoophycos, and help with the morphology of this specific find? I'm under the impression that zoophycos morphology changed throughout the ages, and I'm trying to reverse ID the age of rocks I found it in since the geological maps of my area are extremely vague and lack detail. Let me know if more angles are required for this ID. Cheers.
  3. I found these Rhynchosauroides trace fossil trackways well-defined in the Triassic red bed sedimentary deposits in the Newark Basin in southeastern Pennsylvania. Lincoln cent shows scale.
  4. Hi, what's the thought on these? Highlighted, as common. But seller says it comes off easy and kncluded some non highlighted pics too. From Connecticut River Valley.
  5. Another found in So. Colorado

    After reviewing some of the identified fossils on this site, I think I may have a trace fossil..? But on the opposite side if this rock is another impression of a round “shell.” This was found in Southern Colorado. Any idea what the small shell-shape is in my second photo?
  6. Hello, a bunch of Permian trace fossils that I am interested in buying as a bulk order. Before I can confirm, if anyone could take a peek and let me know that they seem ok, that would be great. All from French locations--but correct spelling may have been jumbled in autotranslate. I'm planning to buy the lot, but if anyone spots anything amiss, if you could let me know, that would be great. They do resemble other similar fossils I've seen for sale online. 1 - Dromopus lacertoides -- Lodeve France 2 - Anthichnium salamandroides - Lodeve France 3 - Anthichnium salamandroides 2 - Lodeve France 4 - Salichnium pectinatus - Lodeve France 5 - x3 ripple marks - Lodeve France 6 - Traces of raindrop - Lodeve France
  7. tubular trace fossils ID?

    New to geology, so excuse my paltry terminology. Description: Tubes, many branching, between 1-3cm in diameter, in places as thick as a forest root system, material very sandstone-y, surrounding material clay. from my research these seem like burrow casts of... worms? tetrapods? do burrow casts form in such abundance?
  8. A few troubling fossils

    Hey guys, I got a couple of fossils I am struggling to ID. All fossils shown were found in Fallen Timber creek, Ab, Canada. They were found along a rock bed along the creek itself. The first set of pics is a rather common fossil I find, with it being a imprint of some kind on a black rock. Was wondering if somebody could ID the actually imprint itself as I am having trouble doing so (think it is some kind of coral or other "aquatic vegetation"). The next set is a bone shaped object, looks to be the end of a joint. But I am unsure if it is just fracturing in the sandstone creating the pattern or if it is an actual fossil (as the inside is sandstone). Last I have a very odd shaped rock with some bumps and odd patterns in it. Unsure with this one as well if it is a fossil or just a rock. (ignore the green tint in the first photo) (also in the first photo set, the specimen wraps around the rock) Thanks to everyone for the help
  9. Ripple marks or something else?

    Found this on my phone from two years ago not sure what i am supposed to be looking at? Threw water on it for some reason. Whole rock is about a foot long.
  10. Crinoid segments or not a fossil?

    Found on blackstone river NWT Canada. Not sure what formation it is but its either devonian or cretaceous nothing between. My best guess is Fort Simpson formation so late devonian.
  11. Possible Devonian trace fossil?

    Hi, newer member and fossil newbie, went on one of my first fossil hunting trips recently at a locality I learned about in part from this forum, so thanks. Found a piece of stone with (what I'm 90% sure is) most of a trilobite on the left, but the stone also had a rounded streak through the middle. Does anyone know if this some form of trace fossil, or just awkward shaping of the stone? The piece is from the middle Devonian and Needmore formation of West Virginia, and the streak is roughly four centimeters long.
  12. Why I Love Blacklight!

    Whenever I bring home a new batch of fossils, I pull out my UV rock lamp. Why? Some fossils glow in the dark, but not in a uniform way. Variations in the mineral composition make for a variety of colors, even when the specimen seems fairly uniform in color in daylight. This can make small, hidden details really stand out. Case in point: This afternoon I was putting away some petrified wood I'd collected awhile back. I pulled out my black light to examine them because some of the wood from this site shows a rainbow of color under UV. This one particular piece was mostly orange under UV, though in camera the hues look different. What really got my attention, however, were a few really vibrant spots on one side. Insect traces! The petrified wood chip is only about 8 cm long. Even with a magnifier, some of the small details are hard to spot. I never would have spotted them in daylight, but they were super bright with the UV. Another box I was sorting through this week contained impressions of brachiopods and trilobites in plain, white limestone. It can be hard to see the contours in the matrix, but they show up much differently under the UV. Finally, UV light can be used to identify fossil mollusks whose patterns have bleached away. About 60% of fossil shells fluoresce and some species have been described based on the residual patterns made visible under ultraviolet light. Note: To photograph these, I used a Convoy UV LED flashlight. I set my camera on a tripod for a 4 second exposure at f/22, with ISO set to 1600. I had my DSLR's white balance set for daylight.
  13. Marine Fossils (Ohio)

    Figured I’d post one more while I’ve got the collection out. When I was younger, my grandfather had a gravel driveway put in. I assume it came from Ohio, although I have no idea in truth. I frequently picked through it and found a few fossils. The gravel is clearly made of marine sediment for the most part - I’ve found brachiopods, trilobite fragments, shells, etc. I just wonder what these two could be? The first one has a couple of different structures in it - I’m thinking sponge or coral for the main part. The second, I have no idea. It looks footprint-ish, but this doesn’t make sense due to the marine nature of the gravel. Any ideas? Thanks, Nate
  14. Possible triassic track?

    I found this near the 476 turnpike where they tore up all the ground and exposed the New Brunswick Formation. This formation is triassic. I went to a dump site where the construction company took all the rock. Is this possibly some sort of trace fossil from a lizard or sphenodontid? (If you neer to see it better flip your phone or device upside down)
  15. Ordovician trace fossil?

    This is another piece from the Platteville formation in Beloit Wisconsin. Inside a gastropod shell there is a hexagonal pattern that sort of looks likes Paleodictyon, but I think this fossil formed in too shallow of water for Paleodictyon to occur, but I am not sure. Its on a 3" post-it note for scale. (There is also a nice Pterotheca to the left!)
  16. Trace Fossils? Western Colorado

    Do these appear to be trace fossils? Found in Western Colorado. Thank you
  17. Short visit (1-2 hours) to famous locality near Las Vegas. I wish we would do better home work because some interesting trace fossils were identified only after we watched the video recordings. Perhaps, our "movie" will help you not to miss them when you will visit this unique place. It was a family Christmas trip, by the way. Also, if you know the species, please help with ID.
  18. I found this on the foreshore at Penarth beach (rocky) close to cliffs. I assumed it could be a trace fossil of some kind? Somebody on Reddit suggested perhaps Fusulinids, and they certainly resemble those from what I’ve seen, but it doesn’t look to tie in with the age of the rocks at the site.
  19. Okay so I found this specimen at the Taughannock Falls in Ithaca New York. I found it at the edge of the gorge which consists of Shale, composed of slit and clay that fell onto lime mud and hardened into rock. I've done some research and it appears to be a Brittle star trace fossil formed by their arm grazing the sand floor. Although, these Brittle Star fish traces are known as "Pteridichnites biseriatus" and they have only been discovered so far in upper Devonian shales out in western and eastern Virginia. I'm not an expert but to my knowledge the Ithaca geological formation is Devonian and was slowly covered by sand. Is it possible that the Brittle Star fish once roamed in the ancient sea now known as "Taughannock falls" today? Because a research team is trying to find this specimen and they are wondering if anyone has discovered it. Edit: Im referring to the dotted trackway. check this link out for more information. http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/news/Pteridichnites.htm
  20. Clam flat

    Found (on skis) in glacial material. Most likely from a lower Devonian marine delta related formation. The traces don't photograph well, but they seem to be closely associated with the bivalve fossil. How do the odds look that the association is trace to maker ?
  21. Who's Permian feet made these?

    If anyone is familiar with Permian tracks, can anyone ID these? All I can tell is that they appear to be synapsid tracks, but not Dimetrodon. I'm assuming that means Edaphosaurus is out too, but that's all I can figure. the ONLY details still known are that they're Permian tracks from somewhere in Arizona. There's no more information available. There's 4 plates... 1-pic 1 2-pics 2,3,4 3-pics 5 4-pics 6,7
  22. Everyone, Any help appreciated. It has been cast and is being referred to others as well. This is a large shale slab fro the Devonian which appears to have been flipped over from stream bottom during a heavy flood event. So this is most likely a positive of an actual negative trace. i.e. a perfect squiggly "groove" 3 feet long. Marc
  23. Hello everyone! I found this specimen also in a creek on a walk through a local park north of Pittsburgh. Thinking it may be a burrow fossil, but if it is, was wondering if there is an actual scientific name for it, so I know how to file it away accordingly under the proper name. Found the term Cruziana online, and wondering if this would qualify. Does anyone have any opinions? Or, if it is a burrow, is there any way of narrowing down what might have made it i.e. trilobites/arthropods etc? Details: 1) Found in isolation/there were no other similar pieces nearby. 2) Measures about 8-12 inches long. Burrow notches are about the width of a penny. 3) Again, found in Carboniferous territory in Western Pennsylvania found in a creek. Thanks everyone!
  24. Florida Invertebrate trace?

    Hoping someone easily recognizes these and its an easy answer...my initial searches have been fruitless... So I was supposed to be looking for more Florida coprolites in the garage piles of fossils and got sidetracked looking as this large Turbinella columella and just noticed these tan circular markings on it and wanted to know if they were traces of serpulids? Probably Pliocene Tamiami formation, Sarasota County, Florida. Whats fascinating to me is their spiral?/concentric, ornamented/segmented? shape which appears to actually be etched into the gastropod shell itself. Almost look like cross sections of forams. I've scraped a number of the small white serpulid tubes off thinking I'd see a similar pattern but there is no marking beneath them--its perfectly smooth. If it is a tube, I wasnt aware that they could actually score the surface of the gastropod shell--seems pretty neat if thats what going on but maybe its something entirely different. The gastropod, aside from being badly damaged has sponge borings, barnacle and coral encrustration, and serpulid tubes. Most of the circular traces are around 1mm in diameter and a few push the 2 or 3mm size. Thanks for the help! Regards, Chris
  25. Hello everyone, I am in desperate need of help with a huge debate I have been having with a friend over fossils preserved in ironstone concretions. From some of what I had read to some advice from other members I it possible to find vertebrate bone among shells and other mollusks preserved in an ironstone concretion. Whether it leaves a trace of the organism, morphs the organic material into the structure of the iron concretion through the decomposition with preserving, or whatever else it may be it seems to be possible. So recently I have hunted a place known to have recorded marine cretaceous shell and other mollusk found in ironstone concretion as well as cretaceous plants in shale, it seems like not to vast of enough study has been done there only from what I know, but since no vertebrate material had yet been discovered there though there can maybe be the possibility. I found these two particularly distinct pieces in iron concretions that exactly mimic the scute structure of soft shell turtle and croc in my opinion, I know how iron concretions are famous for leaving psuedofossils and such but these two pieces look way to exact and since its possible for shells and mollusks to preserve why not scutes? So I am here looking to end this debate, I'm looking for your opinion, can these be labeled as fossils, traces, etc? Or are these among some of the world's best iron concretions and nothing more. Your input especially if you are very experience in this subject would be tremendously appreciated.
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