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Found 48 results

  1. I have a dinosauromorph foot print is it rare? I will upload photos of my collection when I get home later today so stay updated.
  2. Hi friends, I have several of these fossils. I think they look like some sort of worm fossil but can't find anything on the internet similar for comparison. I really don't think it is trilobite tracks because it is deeper. Sorry, I could only get 2 of my pictures to upload. Thanks so much, I would really appreciate any info.
  3. additions to ichnological knowledge

    Buchwitz Michael Buchwitz and Sebastian Voigt On the Morphological variability of Ichniotherium tracks and the evolution of locomotion in the sistergroup of amniotes DOI 10.7717/peerj.4346 Copyright 2018 Buchwitz and Voigt Distributed under Creative Commons CC Please take note:LARGE,35 MB category: somewhere beyond awesome
  4. Who's Permian feet made these?

    If anyone is familiar with Permian tracks, can anyone ID these? All I can tell is that they appear to be synapsid tracks, but not Dimetrodon. I'm assuming that means Edaphosaurus is out too, but that's all I can figure. the ONLY details still known are that they're Permian tracks from somewhere in Arizona. There's no more information available. There's 4 plates... 1-pic 1 2-pics 2,3,4 3-pics 5 4-pics 6,7
  5. Hello everyone. I am an incredibly novice fossil hunter from Pennsylvania. From where I live, it is heavy Carboniferous territory. One of the items on my bucket list is to eventually find something from a temnospondyl, even if it is nothing more than a trackway or even better - a bone fragment! Would anyone be willing to share with me advice on what to look for / or what has helped them in finding anything from a Temnospondyl or Lepospondyl? Do they appear more in certain rocks than others? I live in the Pittsburgh area, near where Fedexia was discovered ten years ago. I'm hoping to eventually find something related to Fedexia or another temnospondyli. From what I'm realizing, these little guys are hard to come by. Any advice? Thanks everyone!
  6. Fossil Tracks?

    Not sure if these are fossil tracks or not. There is more than one and they are all similar. Maybe some kind of sea creature digging? They were steps to a creek so I can’t place a certain age to them. The age around here is Late Cretaceous so sometime around that time is most likely. Denton, Texas, USA.
  7. Made an incredible discovery at home tonight when I noticed tiny baby dinosaur tracks about only 5.1mm long on a ripple slab I had found. I've never seen baby footprints so small before, so I'm amazed. No wonder I didn't notice them for nearly two weeks after I had found them this month! Since there seems to be a partial adult on the edge it makes me wonder if this dinosaur was walking with its new born baby.
  8. I have started recently being able to hunt dinosaur footprints and while I don't want to cover the ones that are naturally visible I may want some of the lower quality or hard to see tracks to stand out. Anyone prepare tracks themselves or know of a good clear coating? I've heard of rustoleum but I am unsure if it's paint or spray I should be using.
  9. Listing for dimetrodon manus track from el pueblo, NM. Five claw tip impressions but these are the only pics provided. Any thoughts?
  10. This is another update from one of my older posts where we questioned whether or not my dinosaur track slate is authentic or fake. A reliable friend helped me out with this mission. A lot of controversy was behind this fossil. This thick paint/polish applied to these rocks makes it very difficult to determine what is actually is. I decided to completely start from scratch and remove all paint. When I purchased these tracks, I knew little to nothing about these matters...Now I want to share this post to help anyone else who is interested in buying a dinosaur track online to avoid deception. You have to be very careful. ONLY BUY FROM A RELIABLE SOURCE. Please ask for as many pictures as possible from different angles from the seller and ask as many questions as possible. Locality, who, when, background, etc. There should be no reason why the seller wouldn’t be more than happy to help. When I see that thick polish/paint applied to the tracks, I avoid those listings like the plague, because it usually means something’s off, at least from my experience (others agree). Also note that listings with muliple tracks on one rock is subject to even greater suspicion. More the reason to ask questions and request better pictures. With these being sold I see two strategies played out: 1.) The seller takes a rock with one or two real tracks, and then paints on other fakes to deceive you into thinking, “oh...well this track on the left is clearly a footprint, So the other ones painted must be too...I just don’t see it as much.” And 2.) The seller takes rocks that are similar shale, etc. and paints any groove that looks like a toe, paints another one, and there you have it...a “footprint”. Before you know it, you have 20 small, medium, and large completely fabricated tracks on one rock...all fake. But back to my fossil, below are pictures of the process from beginning to end. I still have a little more work to do, but the fossil already looks much better. I dedicated 2 hours to the cleaning. A lot of scrubing. I was happy to find that the Eubrontes track was authentic. Unfortunately the other tracks, not so much. There may be something else there.. but not sure...doubtful. If there are any, they’re definitely not as evident as the Eubrontes. What I used to remove the paint: 1.) Goo Gone (does a great job for cleaning bones and other fossils in general without leaving any marks or damage, great suggestion by @DPS Ammonite). I suggest the spray. Reason being because it’s easier to apply with one hand and scrub with the other. 2.) One roll of paper towels, or rags ( but be prepared to use a ton of rags). I personally did what I can with the paper towels and then used the rags towards the end to give it a better scrub. If anyone has any other questions please privately DM me. I encourage It. I can advise further in terms of where to avoid.
  11. In St George Utah a massive dinosaur track was discovered (and actually is probably all over the entire city). But the focus today is not on the spectacular tracks but the teeth. They had a few on display but I was told they found a lot, enough for a cabinet full. This is Early Jurassic. Here are a few example of a dilophosaurid type dinosaur Here is an example of smaller theropod.
  12. Possible Paw Track?

    I’m hoping someone can tell me if this is a paw track of some sort? There are three indentations on this rock of very similar shape and size. (four inches wide) Or would it have been impossible for this type of rock to have had any tyoe of tracks? The rock was in my barn in middle Tennessee. Thanks.
  13. This is a follow-up from another post of mine regarding some dinosaur tracks I purchased a while back. We decided that that the Eubrontes track is 100% real, but some of the other footprints may be questionable or exaggerated. The stain that was used sort of makes it hard to tell. I’m not the biggest fan of this dark polish, so I was thinking I might want to remove it and apply a much lighter, more subtle polish to correctly identify which are really dino tracks vs. not. The seller told me that it’s a shoe polish that can be removed. My issue is, I’m not sure how to go about it doing it. How do I do this without damaging the specimen ? Will water and a rag potentially damage it? or is there another better way of going about it? Of course in the end event that it’s not removable it’s not the end of the world because it still a very nice piece, but like I said, I would prefer a more professional look, as I’m trying to get a little more serious about my collection. Appreciate the help and thanks
  14. Mesozoic ichnodiversity of Africa

    About 3,4 Mb,and,as such things go,fairly new Kleipl3vmam_Juras_cret_P3P.pdf Useful?Innerestin'?
  15. See El Paso dinosaur tracks in public tour this Sunday El Paso 411, January 5, 2018 http://elpaso411.com/2018/01/see-el-paso-dinosaur-tracks-in-public-tour-this-sunday/ http://www.insightselpaso.org/first-sunday-dinotracks-public-tour/ Note: January 7, 2018 tour is now full. Next tour is February 4, 2018. Go see El Paso Science Center, Inc. at http://www.insightselpaso.org/first-sunday-dinotracks-public-tour/ The Dinosaur Tracks of Mount Cristo Rey http://www.geo.utep.edu/pub/dinosaurs/ Insights offers dino tracks to NM Park could be start for proposed Rio Grande Trail By David Crowder, El Paso Inc. March 14, 2016 http://www.elpasoinc.com/news/local_news/insights-offers-dino-tracks-to-nm/article_80cfee9e-e9f6-11e5-8193-9b3d1927b42b.html Related papers are: Kappus, E. and Cornell, W.C., 2003. A new Cretaceous dinosaur tracksite in Southern New Mexico. Paleontologia Electronica, 6, pp. 1-6. http://palaeo-electronica.org/2003_1/track/track.pdf?iframe=true&width=640&height=480 Kappus, E.J., Lucas, S.G. and Langford, R., 2011. The Cerro de Cristo Rey Cretaceous dinosaur tracksites, Sunland Park, New Mexico, USA, and Chihuahua, Mexico. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 53, pp. 272-288. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283015035_The_Cerro_de_Cristo_Ray_Cretaceous_Dinosaur_tracksites_Sunland_Park_New_Mexico_USA_and_Chihuahua_Mexico Yours, Paul H.
  16. Fossils Stolen from Death Valley National Park Release Date: March 28, 2017 Contact: NPS Investigative Services Branch Tip Line: 888-653-0009 https://www.scribd.com/document/343346806/Stolen-Fossils#from_embed Fossils Tracks Stolen from Death Valley National Park By: Jesus Reyes, News Channel 3, March 28, 2017 http://www.kesq.com/news/fossils-stolen-from-death-valley-national-park/421278918 Fossils Tracks Stolen from Death Valley National Park KTNV News http://www.ktnv.com/news/fossils-stolen-from-death-valley-national-park National Park Service investigating theft of fossil footprints from Death Valley, Las Vegas Review-Journal http://www.reviewjournal.com/local/nevada/national-park-service-investigating-theft-fossil-footprints-death-valley A related article: Ancient beasts roamed this secret spot in Death Valley, but you probably can't go, Los Angeles times, http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-death-valley-fossils-20161116-story.html Yours, Paul H.
  17. Three Toed Tracks In Coconino Sandstone

    I have a piece of Coconino sandstone with tracks from a three toed critter I'd appreciate some help identifying. Thank you.
  18. UNLV researchers puzzle over tracks left near Gold Butte that predate dinosaurs by Henry Brean, Las Vegas review-Journal. November 6, 2016 http://www.lasvegasnow.com/news/ancient-reptile-footprints-found-in-nevada/605337375 http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/science-and-technology/unlv-researchers-puzzle-over-tracks-left-near-gold-butte-predate Stephen Rowland In The News, University of Las Vegas https://www.liedinstitute.com/news/experts/in-the-news/83463 Desert Sands Freeze-Framed Dinosaur Tracks By Linda Faas, Mesquite Citizen Journal http://mesquitecitizen.com/viewnews.php?newsid=6772&id=16 Yours, Paul H. Triassic Gold Butte Clark county
  19. dino on the beach

    razzolgalobnatichvertebrsrep31494.pdf
  20. Montana tracks

    I was looking around a friends rock quarry and found this mudstone slab covered in what looks like bird tracks. Are they? and if so how should I preserve them. I have Paleobond sealer. Should I use it? Thanks
  21. Clifton (June 2014)

    As I promised myself, this has now become a yearly trip for me. As I'm getting ready to head out soon, let's reminisce on a previous trip that happened on one, if not THE hottest day of June of 2014. ..as one comes down from the wave breakers near the wharf of Stonehaven I checked the weather for that day and I knew it was going to be a hot one, but I never anticipated what hot was in this area. I've prepared but soon to find out I could have been more careful. But I digress. Moving on. If you've been keeping tabs on my previous Clifton posts, you'll remember that these layers are mostly perpendicular to each other, almost perfectly horizontal observed in short distances. The Sandstone tends to meet with meandering bodies of water. When you walk, you'll mostly see the rock layers as shown from the pic above, and then bam, you'll get to see this: The lenses show bodies infilled with different clast size, forming sandstone and/or mudstone type filled channels. Here's what I see when I look at the photo above: Close up Water channels that move, in perpetual motion, migrating this way or that. Interesting features as one tends to keep a closer eye for any sign of trackways. The strata in Clifton also contain in situ wonderful tree specimens that rival the ones at Joggins, at least in size. I can't recall if I've encountered one tree in Clifton that had been scared by flames such as in its almost twin in Joggins, but I'll have to make note next trek. When you're lucky enough, you will get shale that can be split without destroying the whole sample. The fragility of some makes it tough to be able to conserve in one piece but it happens from time to time. The details on some of these plants are exquisite. There are a few other places in New Brunswick, such as Minto, where plants have been perserved in similar high contrast. I haven't had the time to delve into naming different members of specific genus or families, but that will come soon enough. This is an interesting fella Calamite, annularia... As the Sun started beating down on me and my water reserve severely depleting, I turned tail and made my way off the beach. These cliffs created a dead zone as no current was passing through and I could feel the full brunt of an almost 40 degree Celcius heat. By the time I had made my way up and recovered, I've realized how close I came to having a heat stroke. Hospitalization would have probably happened. On my way back to Moncton, which was about 3 hours drive back South of the province, the heat had taken its effects on me and luckily my parents lived on the road on the main stretch. I stopped and rested for a while to try to recuperate and gather some semblance of strength and finished my trip. I think it is in the cards to bring at least a partner next time I go. There is a whole lot to do in Clifton and there are many opportunities to explore in this locale. The main thing beside shining a spotlight in this geographical treasure trove, is to have locals made aware of how important this site is for not just New Brunswick, but for the entire scientific community. There is some work being done on some discoveries made in the recent years, but there is vast potential to make more. As long as there is interest, people will keep being drawn to this forgotten shore where once vast forests doted the land, offering life and shelter to its many denizens. The search continues. - Keenan
  22. Joggins, Nova Scotia - October 2014

    October of 2014 saw a few storms that rocked the coast of Joggins pretty good. In sites like these, the day(s) after a storm is the best day to see if nature revealed more of its secrets. I invited my friend Ray to come down South to Nova Scotia with me for a little trip and boom, on the road with good company! For people that don't know what or where Joggins is by now (look up my previous posts or just search for it on the 'InTeRnEtS' via a search engine), you'll find out that this UNESCO site plays a crucial part in trying to understand our past, before the domination of giant diapsids, aka dinosaurs. This place touts having discovered some of the (if not the) oldest reptile ever found, which most remains are lodged inside fossil trees which Joggins is reknowned for. The area that we usually like to walk to is a section along the Joggins Formation, located between Lower Cove and Shulie. The formations North/North East of the targeted section, Boss Point/Lower Cove, are older. The cliffs are set as classic layer position, although tilted for a few kilometers, where the older rock is at the bottom, and topped with younger strata. There is a nice spot to park near the small bridge in Lower Cove. From there, you make your way down and start heading South. It only takes a few hundred feet before you start encountering the exposed cliff strata. Calamite within another plant fossil(square on scale=1cm) Walking a few meters more we noticed this while looking up... As we saw some of the sandstone slabs and boulders slide down the cliff, or just hang there precariously, we came up upon this slab. These had wonderful tetrapod tracks running on one side of the slab of sandstone, running from the bottom, and running off on the left side. These prints are not bad, well preserved, and can easily make out the manus and pes (hands and feet) of the track-making animal. The average height of these prints are between 3 to 4.5 CM, with a width of 4 to 4.5 CM. I have many more photos that offer different angles and exact scale measurements, which I didn't post. And yes I realize that the scale on these 3 pics obscure an actual print. My bad. Ray playing the role of the human scale Trying to figure out from which layer this dropped from Being observers without a permit, we had to leave the tracks untouched where we found them. Unfortunate as these are most probably shattered in pieces, carried by the strong tides. We that, we moved on. The remainder of our walk is what is considered a typical Joggins walk, seeing trees, roots, plants, and the occasional fern. Tree cast with coal Close up Stigmaria Mass of ferns Tree cast Calamite There might be changes coming and the chance to save these type of fossils could be made a little easier with positive collaboration with invested entities such as the Joggins Fossil Center. In the future, I and others will have to be more careful in capturing relevant data, flagging the specimen(s), record the coordinates, and try to flag someone who has the power to extract said so fossil(s). This way the chances to save something like the trackways found that day from the ravages of time and nature would be more favorable. Time will tell. Till the next adventure! - Keenan
  23. Recently bought a couple of Grallator dinosaur footprints. A Podokesaurus South Hadley, MA in the Connecticut River Valley. and one from La Grand-Combe, the Mont Lozère, France. Curious to see what others have.
  24. Roadcuts

    Anyone ever collect along road cuts in Connenticut? It seems like most of the sedimentary rocks of the right age run through interstate highways. If you have collected where was it and what did you find? (pictures would be great, site or fossil)
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