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Found 33 results

  1. From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    Petrified wood purchased in Pennsylvania. Location of origin, age, and species is all unknown.
  2. Might be a case of pareidolia but these oddly shaped rocks resemble something... First to me looks like tree bark. (is it real?) Second i have no idea what it looks like (most likely just a weird way the rock broke) [Found in Kanawha County WV, Dunkard Group]
  3. This week we found ourselves headed for Carbon County, PA and looked up some places to go hunting. St. Clair was out, but there were some references to Carbondale here and there. As the name suggests, Carbondale was a coal mining town. There are active and inactive areas all over town, much of it fossiliferous. The most popular spot seems to be the one we went to, a tailings pile next to an apartment complex off of Westside Rd. The land status is unknown, but there were was nothing posted, so we ventured in as many have done before us. Our directions said to follow the gravel path between the third and fourth buildings on the right, then bear left and continue to the en of the ravel road, where you'd see a "mountain of tailings." When we parked, I looked from side to side for a pile I expected to be maybe the size of a van. From behind me, I hear my husband say, "Oh, that mountain of tailings." I looked from side to side. No, her told me, look straight ahead and up. Oh! It was indeed a mountain! The pile loomed above the rich grove. How did I miss that? (On a return trip a couple days later, I noticed it also loomed over the apartments!) A narrow trail leads through the woods to a meadow and a bare section of wall just asking to be explored. April was the perfect time to go as all the weeds were down from the winter snows and not yet regrowing much. The trees growing from the wall itself provided just enough footing for me to climb without sliding back down - until I wanted to. Whee! Once I reached the wall, it took me only seconds to spot my first bit of Calamities bark, and then another, and then a complete, 3D stalk section! After about an hour of searching I spotted a limb sticking put of the fine slate crumbs and pulled it out. It was a chunk of Calamites stalk as big as my outstretched hand. I spent a total of about 5 hours over two days scrabbling across a sheer wall of loose shale. Ferns! Leaves! Roots! Seeds! Bark of all different textures! Some of the ferns were incredibly detailed. One had all the miniscule veins outlined in red (pyrite?), while others were just extremely fine impressions in the grey rock. As it turns out, the gravel road itself runs across an overgrown tailings pile. Here and there you can find exposed rock, including bark plates bigger than dinner dishes! After spending what felt like an hour on day 2 (It turned out to be three hours!!!) I decided it was time for lunch and slid down the hill like a little kid. There at the base of the hill, was mu find for the week: a whole section of tree(?) trunk with bark all the way around the specimen. It was lying alone in the woods on some leaves, just waiting for someone to wander off the beaten path. I debated about bringing it home. It was so big! Hubby was snoozing on a nearby rock. Rocks are not his thing and bringing home piles of them doubly so, but he is so sweet that he picked that heavy thing up before I could blink and carried it to the car himself. He's a keeper! It will take quite some time to photograph all my treasures, but I will post in the comments here when I have an album together.
  4. Kathleen B. Pigg of the University of Arizona notes that this "stem subsurface pattern that is sometimes called 'rabbit tracks'. The double track you see is probably a result of a pair of air channels that accompany the leaf trace through the cortex. The vertical ribs are produced by an increase of bark through secondary tissue production." The pair of sepicemns in the first image are the positive and negative impressions of the same piece. The second image is a detail from the same specimen.
  5. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  6. From the album Carbondale, PA

    I found a whole plate of these, but somehow only the one example made it home. 13mm long Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  7. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  8. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Finely parallel-veined leaves of a Cordaites plant alongside the branch or root of a giant Lycopod (aka scale tree or club moss). The latter could grow up to 50 m high! found in Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous) period 299-323 myo
  9. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  10. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a tree-like plant with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Carbondale, PA. Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  11. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a bamboo-like plant closely related to modern horsetails with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  12. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  13. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Unidentified species of petrified wood Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  14. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Detail from previous image Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period 299-323 myo
  15. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Calamities sp., a tree-like plant with hollow, woody stem that grew more than 100 ft high (30m). Found in a tailings pile in Carbondale, PA.
  16. From the album Carbondale, PA

    Syringodendron sp. (Sigillaria family) Carbondale, PA Lewellyn Formation Pennsylvanian period
  17. From the album Nigel's album

  18. Would anyone have any sort of idea of how much this Stigmaria fossil might be worth? It is approximately 12 in. x 6 in., I do not know where it originally is from. It was found within the landscape rocks of my sisters house, which is in southwest Ohio. From what I know of these, they are Carboniferous and not typically found around here, since most of the fossils found here (Cincinnati, OH) are usually Ordovician. I was thinking this stigmaria might have been transported with rocks from a quarry for landscaping purposes. The house is over 50 years old, so I have no way of knowing where the rocks came from. I was thinking of offering my brother in law something for this fossilized tree root (He does not collect fossils by the way.) What would this stigmaria be worth to someone who collects fossils like me? Thanks to anyone who replies, your opinions will be appreciated.
  19. From the album Plant Fossils

    Lepidodendron sp. Location: Villablino, Spain Age: Carboniferous

    © @copy Olof Moleman

  20. Found on a beach outside of Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada - closer to Cheverie. Beautiful slate beaches and near huge gypsum deposits. March 2016
  21. Can anyone tell me the name of the tree ? Diameter: 3 cm
  22. this is given to me via an inheritance so I don't know where it came from it looks like it has dark red blood cells almost in it can't decide if it's bone or tree. any ideas? thank you in advance for your time.
  23. Hello. On my stretch of the Northumberland coast in England I have found evidence of petrified trees, such as this stump. I can find no information about them online in my location, so please could you tell me (based on this stump) when would it have been a living tree and probably what type of tree? At various points along the coast the remains are usually within grey mudrock or grainy sandstone, but this stump is in hard solid rock (I don't know of what type; maybe of silt as it's not visibly grainy). What would the environment have been like here when this tree was alive? Anything extra you can tell me specifically about this tree/stump in the context of my location would be gratefully received; I need as much info as possible, so any further sources of location specific help you could point me towards would be fantastic. Thank you very much.
  24. UPDATE: August 20, 2013 - A new site for Wattieza - the world's oldest known tree Since posting this, the debate about "orthocone" versus "Devonian tree" has been settled. The Devonian tree experts have weighed in and confirm that these are Devonian tree shoots. They were growing in a swampy shallow marine environment similar to how modern mangroves grow. Since our original discovery - which represents an entirely and previously unknown site for Devonian Wattieza trees - my wife and I have collected more than a dozen separate fossils including some with surrounding substrate, from this site. I have cleaned most of the specimens and am taking closeup photos from all perspectives, now, to show such things as the central tube (called a stele) that runs through the core and the texture of the outer covering. In addition to Wattieza we have also discovered a separate Devonian plant species which we are attempting to evaluate and identify. Here is a photo from our SECOND site visit that shows the actual small Wattieza stump fossil that we collected, placed in front of a photo of the same fossil in the substrate as we found it. You can also see the adjacent "stick" which we currently believe is NOT part of the Wattieza stump - a separate closeup of the stick is included. We are currently looking at our several "stick" fossils and planning to cut one to look at the cross-section pattern, to try to determine the plant species. We feel that these finds have the potential to add new information about Devonian trees and plants, from this new site. It is also significant that we found these in a Devonian site where there are normally only marine fossils so we appear to have found a rare "island" of ideal conditions where young mangal Wattieza trees were growing in a paleosol where the conditions allowed fossilization. Geologically, these fossils are at the lower end of the "Tully limestone" formation. Our Devonian tree/plant finds confirm our thinking as "advanced amateur" paleontologists that as amateur fossil hunters we all can and should be using our time and knowledge to discover new sites and add to the fossil record. The small "army" of fossil hunters represented on The Fossil Forum have a unique opportunity to look in places where scientists may not have an opportunity - or inclination - to search. Once in awhile we discover something important, which seems to be the case here. OUR ORIGINAL POST Before I write our 4th of July trip report, I asked for some ID help with 3 tube shaped fossils we discovered at Tully, NY (Devonian, Hamilton Group) - the first opinion I received is that these are orthocone cephalopods. A contrary view is that these are Devonian trees! I modified the description slightly from the original post to reflect the current debate which has made this a "hot" topic. Have to admit, it's kind of cool that our first major fossil trip this year has sparked such an interesting discussion! Nan and I found these in situ sitting vertically in the substrate of a new construction site. I had found a few very large (2 inch diameter) cylinder shaped segments in the rubble that looked like cephalopod pieces and they were the largest we have seen to-date, so we were intrigued and started pulling away the substrate in the vertical walls exposed by the bulldozer. The first two fossils were found about a meter apart and the third was found about 300 meters away over a hill, but in the same level strata and depth. I'll do some minor cleaning, take better pix of the recovered fossils and segments, and add them soon - there appears to be a siphuncle structure running through the center, and other clues to the identity. Here is a quick view of how and where they were found - of course we realize it's very rare to find this type of fossil vertically embedded in the substrate. Nan found the first one, I found the next two and excavated all three - will provide more photos soon but hoped to get an ID first. The third sample had about 2/3 with the bottom portion missing. The first two appear to spread out slightly at the bottom. Several people suggested these could be trees and a few said other creatures but most people I talked to before posting this seem to agree they are orthocone cephalods. Aside from their size and shape (which is unusually large for the Tully shale so these are rare especially found in situ) - the primary convincing evidence is the siphon (siphuncle) protruding from the tip of the top of one of the specimens. This structure runs like a worm through the center - the other segments show holes in the center where the "wormlike body" ran through it. This argues against trees or other creatures but a few people claim that Devonian trees did have a similar center structure. The most confusing aspect is the lack of hard shell which should be present if this were a cephalopod - so what does that suggest? Another type of creature? Did they moult their shells and is this the "soft shelled" phase? Or is this a tree? Here is the top segment from the best specimen which clearly shows the siphuncle protruding at the center. In addition to the segmented tube shaped structures (they are all about the same diameter and length) there appear to be tentacle shaped structures on the left side although I didn't recover those when I extracted the tubes. Of course if this is a tree, then it is possible that those structures could be shoots. The tentacles or shoots were not recovered and are only shown in the photo which unfortunately limits the analysis. Here is how the debate seems to be shaping up: Pro Orthocone Cephalopod - These 3 specimens were found in what appears to be a Devonian marine environment where all of the fossils found there have been marine fossils. They have a small center "worm like" structure running through the center that looks like a siphuncle (siphon). They are all segmented and all the same approximate length and diameter. One was partially collapsed and distorted (some segments bulging outward). No one has suggested a cephalopod species that this might represent. Pro Devonian Tree - The horizontal strata where they were found contained very few if any marine fossils so they could be small young trees growing in the water. There is no trace of any shell fragments which is unusual if this is a cephalopod and the segments don't resemble cephalopod shells. There is a thin outer "skin" which could be consistent with ancient horsetail type bark. In the cross section of the segments, there are no concentric circles - in early trees there was pith, not traditional wood with concentric growth circles and some people have indicated that the first Devonian trees did have a similar center structure. The center core that looks like a siphuncle would be a core structure called a stele. Piranha suggests that this could be Wattieza sp., a prehistoric cladoxylopsid tree from the Middle Devonian that was discovered in Gilboa, New York which would be consistent with the location which was the Hamilton Group near Tully, NY. This genus has been called the earliest known trees. One of our goals for this fossil trip was to find something larger and distinctive/unusual and apparently we've done that. Another goal we've had since last year was to find a Devonian plant of some sort and it would be cool if that's what this turns out to be. I'll be just as happy if these are orthocones. The debate is hot on the ID for these and with all the attention and help from everyone, we should zone in soon. I'll take some more closeup photos this week and post them here. These are some of the largest fossils Nan and I have found so far and certainly the largest we have found in situ - it's fascinating that we found these exactly where they died and were preserved, 385 mya. I have to admit I felt like RomanK, who finds a lot of stunning in situ fossils and I have to admit, I was consciously trying to think like Roman and inspired by his example while searching for these fossils, which involved a lot of "excavation." UPDATE: NEW PHOTOS/CLOSEUPS At the end of this blog (page 3 and 4) I posted some new closeup images.
  25. tree, coral, rock?