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Found 14 results

  1. This is my round 2, of things i found, and helping me properly name and catalog them. First picture, i think is some kind of coral? 2nd picture - Coral also maybe? kinda looks like little suction cup suckers? 3rd picture - Some kinda spiral shell? 4th picture - Another type of shell 5th picture - probally some type of clam shell, i was excited at first and thought it was a crab top shell. 6th picture - I find alot of these types, a shell of some kind? 7-8-9 - This one is weird, looks like some kind of shell, but then looks almost like it has teeth or little legs. Really want to know what this is? (Deer Lake, Pa.) 10th picture - I found this in a secret spot in St Clair, Pa., looks to me like a segment of a fossilized tree, its round, totally flat on top n bottom, and looks like striations lines in bark? if im right anyway knowing type of tree? Thanks in advance to anyone who helps out, i'll just list round one and two for now, till i get some answers, and if i get anywhere with answers i will post some more, thanks all. Paul.
  2. Hey all, I am in need of a little assistance. I am starting a new research project on the fossil record of American Chestnuts and am having trouble finding any information on their early history and evolution. I have found that they started in Louisiana and moved up northward, but I am having trouble finding dates on when exactly. I was also curious if anyone has an idea of where a good site would be to maybe find an American Chestnut tree leaf (or chestnut) fossil? I know some have been found in Oregon and Idaho, but I am looking for somewhere near southeastern Tennessee. I am willing to make a drive, just don't really have the funds (or time) to fly anywhere to search. Thanks for your help!
  3. October of 2014 saw a few storms that rocked the coast of Joggins pretty good. In sites like these, the day(s) after a storm is the best day to see if nature revealed more of its secrets. I invited my friend Ray to come down South to Nova Scotia with me for a little trip and boom, on the road with good company! For people that don't know what or where Joggins is by now (look up my previous posts or just search for it on the 'InTeRnEtS' via a search engine), you'll find out that this UNESCO site plays a crucial part in trying to understand our past, before the domination of giant diapsids, aka dinosaurs. This place touts having discovered some of the (if not the) oldest reptile ever found, which most remains are lodged inside fossil trees which Joggins is reknowned for. The area that we usually like to walk to is a section along the Joggins Formation, located between Lower Cove and Shulie. The formations North/North East of the targeted section, Boss Point/Lower Cove, are older. The cliffs are set as classic layer position, although tilted for a few kilometers, where the older rock is at the bottom, and topped with younger strata. There is a nice spot to park near the small bridge in Lower Cove. From there, you make your way down and start heading South. It only takes a few hundred feet before you start encountering the exposed cliff strata. Calamite within another plant fossil(square on scale=1cm) Walking a few meters more we noticed this while looking up... As we saw some of the sandstone slabs and boulders slide down the cliff, or just hang there precariously, we came up upon this slab. These had wonderful tetrapod tracks running on one side of the slab of sandstone, running from the bottom, and running off on the left side. These prints are not bad, well preserved, and can easily make out the manus and pes (hands and feet) of the track-making animal. The average height of these prints are between 3 to 4.5 CM, with a width of 4 to 4.5 CM. I have many more photos that offer different angles and exact scale measurements, which I didn't post. And yes I realize that the scale on these 3 pics obscure an actual print. My bad. Ray playing the role of the human scale Trying to figure out from which layer this dropped from Being observers without a permit, we had to leave the tracks untouched where we found them. Unfortunate as these are most probably shattered in pieces, carried by the strong tides. We that, we moved on. The remainder of our walk is what is considered a typical Joggins walk, seeing trees, roots, plants, and the occasional fern. Tree cast with coal Close up Stigmaria Mass of ferns Tree cast Calamite There might be changes coming and the chance to save these type of fossils could be made a little easier with positive collaboration with invested entities such as the Joggins Fossil Center. In the future, I and others will have to be more careful in capturing relevant data, flagging the specimen(s), record the coordinates, and try to flag someone who has the power to extract said so fossil(s). This way the chances to save something like the trackways found that day from the ravages of time and nature would be more favorable. Time will tell. Till the next adventure! - Keenan
  4. As I promised myself, this has now become a yearly trip for me. As I'm getting ready to head out soon, let's reminisce on a previous trip that happened on one, if not THE hottest day of June of 2014. ..as one comes down from the wave breakers near the wharf of Stonehaven I checked the weather for that day and I knew it was going to be a hot one, but I never anticipated what hot was in this area. I've prepared but soon to find out I could have been more careful. But I digress. Moving on. If you've been keeping tabs on my previous Clifton posts, you'll remember that these layers are mostly perpendicular to each other, almost perfectly horizontal observed in short distances. The Sandstone tends to meet with meandering bodies of water. When you walk, you'll mostly see the rock layers as shown from the pic above, and then bam, you'll get to see this: The lenses show bodies infilled with different clast size, forming sandstone and/or mudstone type filled channels. Here's what I see when I look at the photo above: Close up Water channels that move, in perpetual motion, migrating this way or that. Interesting features as one tends to keep a closer eye for any sign of trackways. The strata in Clifton also contain in situ wonderful tree specimens that rival the ones at Joggins, at least in size. I can't recall if I've encountered one tree in Clifton that had been scared by flames such as in its almost twin in Joggins, but I'll have to make note next trek. When you're lucky enough, you will get shale that can be split without destroying the whole sample. The fragility of some makes it tough to be able to conserve in one piece but it happens from time to time. The details on some of these plants are exquisite. There are a few other places in New Brunswick, such as Minto, where plants have been perserved in similar high contrast. I haven't had the time to delve into naming different members of specific genus or families, but that will come soon enough. This is an interesting fella Calamite, annularia... As the Sun started beating down on me and my water reserve severely depleting, I turned tail and made my way off the beach. These cliffs created a dead zone as no current was passing through and I could feel the full brunt of an almost 40 degree Celcius heat. By the time I had made my way up and recovered, I've realized how close I came to having a heat stroke. Hospitalization would have probably happened. On my way back to Moncton, which was about 3 hours drive back South of the province, the heat had taken its effects on me and luckily my parents lived on the road on the main stretch. I stopped and rested for a while to try to recuperate and gather some semblance of strength and finished my trip. I think it is in the cards to bring at least a partner next time I go. There is a whole lot to do in Clifton and there are many opportunities to explore in this locale. The main thing beside shining a spotlight in this geographical treasure trove, is to have locals made aware of how important this site is for not just New Brunswick, but for the entire scientific community. There is some work being done on some discoveries made in the recent years, but there is vast potential to make more. As long as there is interest, people will keep being drawn to this forgotten shore where once vast forests doted the land, offering life and shelter to its many denizens. The search continues. - Keenan
  5. Someone searching the Maritimes for nice articulated plants would ususally end up being referred to known fossil localities in Nova Scotia such as Sydney, Cape Breton. The ferns and other flora found in the coal rich cliffs of Cape Breton are of exceptional quality, but what if I tell you that there's a location in New Brunswick that yields specimens that matches in quality? This province has made many contributions to the field of geology and paleontology since Mitchell and Gesner in the 1850s and the days of the Stonehammer Club. There had been a lull for decades, but with the surging in geotourism and the newly founded Stonehammer Geopark, new research has been made on old and new sites alike. One such site is located in Clifton. Rule of thumb here is that West of Bathurst the rocks get older, and younger East. The sedimentary rocks at Clifton are pretty much around the same time period, late in the Carboniferous (~310 to 300 Mya), matching paleoenvironment. Clifton, New Brunswick (circled in red) As my list of grew longer, Clifton stayed on top of it. When Matt called me and asked if I had any plans that weekend, I suggested that we could head up North. He hasn't been in tha area either, so this was the perfect opportunity to go snoop around. We left Moncton Saturday morning and headed North for Bathurst. The car ride to reach Clifton took a little over 2 hours. Reaching Bathurst, we took Highway 11 and proceeded North-East. We passed Clifton to get to Stonehaven where there is a road leading to a wharf. I parked the car, got the gear ready, and went down the rocks forming a breakwater to get to the beach. It was a bit tricky and the tide had just started going out. Facing South-West, towards Clifton Facing North-East, towards Stonehaven We barely set foot on the beach that we came across these beauties. These tracks were probably made by an arthropod, most likely from a horseshoe crab (limulids). What's interesting is how these animals moved (seems to be more than one animal making these traces in the silty material). We'll have to look further into this, but its obvious that this paleoenvironment was influenced by some sort of salt water body, if these animals were indeed ocean dwelling organisms. Parallel prints with tail drag We carried on and stopped at a few easy accessible spots before having to crawl and tread carefully around slippery seaweed covered rocks. Me! After a few slips, bruises, bloody scratches, and wet boots, we made it to where we wanted to be. The cliffs are somewhat similar to other familiar sites such as Joggins in Nova Scotia. The strata of sedimentary rock have a marginal inclination of about 5 degrees. What surprised us was that we found some trees in situ, popping out from the cliffs. Several trees we've seen were pretty well preserved, and a couple up to a meter in diameter. Matt kneeling beside a big tree! Checking for trackways Within these cliffs are gorgeous ferns and other type of plants belonging to the Carboniferous Period. The plants are found on a light gray shale. There are sections of the cliffs that have talus piled up with lots of plant material. Clifton is an interesting site and may yet yield really important information that could form a more detailed picture of the paleoenvironment of the region. The plants, the trees, the terrain, the bodies of water dominating the landscape, and the animals leaving their traces. The information that we were able to gather that day will be shared with the rest of the community. Clifton has come up a few times in scientific literature, but has like most part New Brunswick, been understudied. We realize that the resources aren't always available, so people like me and you can be the foot soldiers and help the academic community by making these type of discoveries like we did today. Till next time. Cheers! - Keenan
  6. Continued from Part 1 After taking a moment to try to sum up some courage to go down the cable (stupid fear of heights), we made it down to the beach and proceeded to walk North and around Cranberry Point. Cranberry Point The strata of these cliffs, as of many of the coast in this area, have a small angle, making identification of specific layers traceable for long distances. Coal seams were numerous and shale layers very thick at some spots. Getting closer to the North-East section of the point, we could start seeing Carboniferous flora such as calamites and trees in situ, in their growth positions. Calamites in growth position, in situ The trees we found in situ were of different conditions, and some of them subject to a future paper. Amongst these big trees were all sorts of foliage of different state. For some reason I didn't take any photos of the ferns we found. Bleh! I'll be posting about another fossil site that has comparable articulated ferns, in Clifton, New Brunswick. What's important to notice is that some of the trees we've inspected showed traces of sooth, a sign of forest fires that would have created victims. Matt inspecting the base of a tree (tree root left of Matt) Impression on coal residue Annularia and/or Asterophylites (extention segments of calamites) Matt standing on top of a tree segment. Where did it come from? Possibly from this one! How big and tall you think this tree is? Tree segments on the beach, possibly from the same specimen When we were at the Fossil Center earlier in the day, we had a conversation with the staff. One thing we noticed was the lack of vertebrate fossils, or even trackways. I've read that back in the 1950s that vertebrate fossils had be found, even in trees, and several trackways. Guess the surprise I had when I came upon these! Tetrapod trackways! After a couple of hours, we wrapped up and picked up our gear. Our next stop on our list is Point Aconi, located a bit North West of Sydney Mines. Some of the best plant fossils came from this area. Folks at the Fossil Center in Sydney Mines occasionally bring people to this place. The coal seams are thick, but care should be taken when approaching the cliffs as shale and mud stone weathers away and leave these big chunks of coal ready to come crashing down. Point Aconi We went down the beach and before turning the corner to reach the point, we came across some fossil trees, matching some of the specimens found at Cranberry Point. We took some data for future reference and carried on. There was at one point some very nice plant fossils, but they've pretty much all been smashes to bits. We did find some nice fragments and nice articulated ferns, but not what I was expecting. I for some reason forgot to take pics of them, which was the purpose of me bringing my snarge camera! Coal breaking away from the cliffs Looking towards the Atlantic Ocean After a while we decided to call it quits for the day and head back to Sydney. We met up with one of Matt's friend and had supper in town. We were invited to crash and tent at another of his friend's grandparents house in the area. We arrived at the house and set our tents and had a nice quick chat with Kendra and her folks. On to Part 3!
  7. From my blog post http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/joggins-march-2013.html I had been cooped up for a few months and the last few weeks of winter had been brutal health wise. I thought at one point I was having cabin fever symptoms. A few weekends ago I had taken a nice little drive in the Cape Enraged (New Brunswick) at the end of my bout with a nasty flu. The weather had been a little bit better and the Sun was actually gonna make an apparition for much of the weekend, so there was no way I would stay at home and not partake in a little road trip! I drove South to Joggins for a short road trip. By the time I would get there, low tide would have already started to turn. I hit the beach at about 8:30am and it was a little bit nippy, especially in the shadow of the cliffs. Big chunks of ice were hanging high and melting, causing sediment to fall in big heaps at the foot of the cliffs. I had a few hours of wandering on the beach before it became too dangerous with the Sun bearing down on the ice. The trees that were familiar to me from last year were practically all gone, either buried in sediment, or carried away by the force of the tides. There was a few that had escaped destruction, for the time being anyways. But with all this weathering and grinding of the rocks by Mother Nature, lots of new material surfaced on the beach. New plants, animals, and trackways littered the beach. I didn't stick around too long, but I did take a few pics here and there. Joggins was a little trip to get me going. I'll probably hit the Blomidon area next to see what secrets the beaches have dug up. Cross bedding Calamite Water channel One of the few remaining trees
  8. Taken from blog post http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/07/joggins-nova-scotia-june-2013.html Being on vacation meant being on the road, looking for rocks. That also meant that during that week, I had to make at least one stop at Joggins, in the wet province of Nova Scotia, where the bees shoot flames, and.. ok, lets move on. Here's a few photos of my trek down the beach. Like always, be mindful of the tides. Not knowing when high tide comes in could spell trouble as exit routes are not easily found. So you'd end up stranded for a few hours, so really not recommended to stick around when high time comes around. Sand nodule containing plants The sand nodules that I found on the beach are extremely hard and those I came across contained mostly plants, like the one I found already cracked on the photo above. Some of them were covered with pyrite (fool's gold). Trackways or sediment deformation? Lots of new plants, especially calamites (some whole) A lonely fern Found the other print of the lonely fern Got to the coal mine shaft and was surprised of how much had eroded away in a matter of weeks. Parts of the top of the shaft had collapsed then washed away, leaving a bigger gap. You could smell sulfur, and it smelled like heck! Mine shaft pic taken last year (left) and this Summer (right) View of inside the shaft Stigmaria ('tree' root) Calamites in situ Sigillaria imprint I was surprised that this time around there were not many trees. I've found one partly buried in scree, and another (mostly flame scarred) loose on the beach. There was a lot of material that had come loose, but the tide had managed to carry and spread these all over. This spot is usually hard to resist when talking rock trip. Every time I come down here, I end up seeing an ever changing scenery. If you're ever in the area of Joggins, Nova Scotia, stop by. Its worth it. Cheers! - Keenan
  9. Taken from blog post http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/06/clifton-new-brunswick-2013.html During my vacation, I made a day trip to Clifton, in northern New Brunswick. I've been to that location last year and made some interesting finds, including some nice ferns. This trip wasn't as fruitful as I had hoped, but I managed to take photos of the numerous trees in situ (surprised by the number present) and the drive in itself was nice. Always be mindful of the tides when you venture down these beaches as you could get trapped with not many ways out. Getting my stuff together Where most of the trees are found Tree #1 - Bottom section (walking stick for scale, 1 meter long) Tree #2 - Tree with roots going through various layers Close-up of 'Tree #2' Tree #3 Tree #4 (zoomed in on right) What would have been 'Tree #5' One of the very few plants I've come across (sparse this year) Tree #6 with broken section on the beach Close-up of 'Tree #6' Tree segments Tree #7 Photo of 'Tree #7' taken the previous year It ended up to be a great day to be on the beach. The morning was gloomy but by the time I was done, the Sun had come out and I ended up enjoying the walk. I'll probably make this a yearly trek to see how the bay shapes the cliffs of Clifton and what could potentially come out. Till next time! - Keenan
  10. From my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/economy-point-copequid-bay.html Back in August of 2012, I took part of a walk organized by the Fundy Geological Museum (FGM). It was in the middle of the week (Thursday August 9th, I think), so there wasn't any tourist or non-employee beside myself. The gang consisted of geology students and staff, led by Ken Adams, the curator of the FGM. Looking out towards Cobequid Bay Economy is located in Nova Scotia, East of Parrsboro in Cumberland County. From Parrsboro, you take the 2 road and head East, past Five Islands Provincial Park. Economy Point has many trails that are beach accessible, but the getting there can be messy with the muddy silt snaking within the bay. View of Five Islands (background) The rocks of this area are part of the Wolfville Formation, Triassic aged red siltstone and desert sandstones, a lot of it apparently sculpted by wind. The bottom part of the cliffs along the bay are of this red sandstone, and upon it rests several feet of glacial till from the last ice age that helped sculpt the area. Moving around entailed hiking up and down huge slabs of sandstone that displayed odd physical features. There are all sorts of trackways and burrows, but there are also structures that none of us could readily identify. Burrows? Plant traces? Toolmarks? Triassic sandstone (bottom), glacial till (top) Diplichnites (such as of a myriapod)? Natural caves Water channel Bird nests in the cliffs The further East we walked, the stranger the physical features would get. Even Ken was baffled by some of the structures we'd come across. Here's a few photos taken by my Blackberry and you be the judge. Can you identify any of the following? Bottom of a tree (?) Tree roots (?) Many of the structures are found on this red sandstone Worm burrows? These holes are so odd. At first I thought they were cavities left behind by plants, but some of these exhibit strange patterns around, looking bizarrely like projectile of some sort. Some of these 'projectile' show patterns and/or direction. Am I imagining things? After a long and hot afternoon, we turned back and made it back to our cars, pondering on what we saw. We were intrigued by what we had found. Was this unique? If not, where else could we find these? Any feedback would be much appreciated! =)
  11. **NOTE** In Nova Scotia, it is illegal to collect fossils or archaeological artifacts without a Heritage Permit or proper authorization. You can message me if you want more info. Hang on tight, my posts are usually long winded! [Taken from my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca] Not too long ago I had made a list of fossil locations I would like to visit when I felt more knowledgeable and honed some of my field work skills. I had told my friend Matt Stimson (who works in the field of palaeontology) that I thought of heading East in Cape Breton sometime in the Summer. He wanted to tag along as he's familiar with the area and wouldn't mind revisiting some of the great locales around Sydney. We decided that we'd spend 3 days in Nova Scotia (August 3rd to 5th, 2012). From Moncton (New Brunswick) to Sydney (Nova Scotia) is about a 5 hour drive one way. On our way to Cape Breton on Friday, we planned to take a little detour to Parrsboro and stop by to see Tim Feydak at Wasson Bluff. As I've mentioned in the past, Wasson Bluff has in its cliffs some of Canada's oldest dinosaurs, prosauropods. Many important scientific contributions were made in this small corner of the world. Tim has taken up the torch and continues the tradition by laboring under the shadow of these red sandstone Triassic cliffs. - Day 1 Matt Stimson (left) and Tim Feydak (center) We swung by and Tim was already at the location working at it. He's been sifting through material for bone fragments from a section of the cliff that was quickly eroding. Shortly after meeting Tim, we were joined by our friend Ken Adams, curator of the Fundy Geological Museum in Parrsboro, and some of its young staff. Some of the crew collecting material from target area Bone in sandstone The tide was coming in, so we decided to give Tim a hand sifting through the material that he had collected. Not only is there bone material from these primitive dinosaurs, but those of ancient reptiles such as crocodiles. Some layers of the cliffs contain bones and teeth of fish such as primitive sharks. We've made a few finds for the short time we were there. These will be brought back to the museum lab for cleaning and prep work. The "Two Brothers" in the background, basalt islands One of the teeth found that day (center, top of rock) After a few hours, we headed out for a bite to eat at one of the local restaurants before hitting the road. The plan was to at least take the 104 East towards Port Hawkesbury, and once crossing the Canso Causeway, to find a camping close to Sydney. Sydney Coal Fields (area of interest in red) We drove for a few hours and we came across the Ben Eoin Beach Resort and Camping Grounds, on the shores of Bras d'Or Lake. The entrance had areas where you could pitch your tent, picnic tables, and spots for starting your campfire. Closer to the lake was a long stretch of land where you could park your camper, with a cabin where you could take your shower. Price was reasonable, and the scenery was beautiful! We threw our tents out and settled for the night. - Day 2 We woke up as the Sun came up, grabbed a bite to eat, and planned our day. There was plenty of time before the tides were low enough to hit our fossil sites in the Sydney area, so Matt suggested we check a quarry before heading to town. Matt getting ready (Quartz vein , rock bearing rubies [center-right to right]) This abandoned quarry bears a regional treasure: Cape Breton rubies! This granite-type hard igneous has rubies which the quality is all over the spectrum. We took our tools and proceeded up the quarry, whacking pieces of this creamy colored ruby gemstone. I've seen one cut before, but its pretty cool to actually get them from the source. Along with the rubies, I also got my hands on some nice quartz crystals from a big vein jutting out vertically from the quarry. Some collected samples Ruby in the rough =) Taking a break, watching grasshoppers doing their business Satisfied with our haul of pretty rocks, we hopped back in the car and headed towards Sydney. Sydney region's areas of interest: 1- Cranberry Point; 2- Point Aconi; 3- Donkin Peninsula First order of business as soon as we rolled in to town was to grab some early dinner. There was still some time before the tides were down, so Matt suggested we go visit the Fossil Center in Sydney Mines. Displays at the Cape Breton Fossil Center, Sydney Mines It was nice to swing by the center to check the type of fossils first hand found in the region. Most of the fossils they have at the center are plants, but man are they nice. The specimens they have are numerous, and in well built displays. We also took a moment to head over their other museum that displayed Sydney's mining past. Megaphyton (tree fern) showing frond scars (elongated oval features) After our visit, we made our way towards Cranberry Point in the Sydney Mines area, stopping at a few places along the way. Many of the coast of the area is elevated, meaning that there are many cliff face to explore, exposing coal seams and various fossils. Fossilized tree This area that the greater Sydney area is located in is described of being part of the Sydney Coal Fields. This section of the island is dominated by Carboniferous Period topography (Nova Scotia Geological Map), contributing to Sydney's rich coal industry. The plants found in these shale are like no other. These articulated plants have been the subject of study since the mid-1860s. Even though there is a rich catalog of fossils, there are still big gaps in the record and much more studying to be done. We were hoping that our weekend would yield more secrets to us. Calamites First location on our list was Cranberry Point, North of Sydney Mines. We had some friends that were at this location recently and confirmed that there were upright trees, mostly bigger than the ones you'd usually see at Joggins, the world famous UNESCO site. Matt had been here in the past, so he knew which roads to take in this maze of houses and cottages. We made our way down Peck Street and Matt was surprised that the road that led to the Point had a brand new house built in its way. We parked the car and walked up to where the old road was and met with the very nice lady that owns the new home. She was very interested by our work and would love for us to drop by after our trek and share what we found. Remains of World War II's past Where Peck Street ends, there's an old dirt road that leads to an old WWII era building, or what's left of it. It sits on a piece of the cliff that is slowly becoming an island. The trail that used to connect the mainland and this quasi-island has eroded away. The only thing that's left is a sheer fall, with a cable dangling down for beach access. That was our way down. Rope access (Gulp!) On to Part 2!
  12. From the album 2012/13 Discoveries

    Little piece of heaven,
  13. Continued from Part 2 Lycopsid tree with bark (top of tree) One of many eagles we sighted flying over us. The high winds will sometimes push small rodents off the cliffs and result in their untimely deaths. This proves easy pickings for those winged predators. We had a guardian dog at Blue Beach, might as well have some guardian Eagles at Joggins. Those were incredibly BIG birds, over a meter in width easily. Hardscrabble Point (with Brian in the foreground) One of many trees exposed in the cliffs View from the car on our way back By the time we chit chatted with Brian a bit and the time he took off, it was close to 8pm. We stopped at a local restaurant to grab a bite to eat and chit chat with friends. We stayed a bit, enough time for me to enjoy some cinnamon goodness. Oooooh sooo good!! Matt had given Don Reid a call but he wasn't there. We stopped at Gloria's house, Don's daughter, and his car was there. We had a great time at their house. I love coming to Joggins where you'll find some of the friendliest people. Great hospitality! By the time we said our goodbyes, it was close to 11pm and it had started to snow. We took the road and let me say that, visibility was snarge. If it weren't for the wind, visibility would have been just fine, but it was like a blizzard. Good thing my car was still winterized, but there was nothing to worry about for the road were in good condition. Driving on country road was nerve wracking, but the highway proved a bit easier. Still, I didn't dare driving more than 80km/hr as sometimes I had to use the lines on the road as guides. As soon as we hit Moncton, it stopped snowing. All and all, this was an excellent trip. Tired, but oh so very freakin well worth it. I was extremely happy to get this type of road trip done this early in the season. I can't wait for other treks in the following weeks, where weather will even be more favorable. We've done a short list of sites we need to check as soon as possible, so we'll have that to keep us very busy for the next little while. I'll be adding a few more posts, so I'll be getting back in the groove. Till then, cheers!
  14. We're taking a closer look at our finds from St. Clair and one of the more interesting fossils is a well articulated stem of some sort - about 7 cm long - broken into two sections. It's in a 3D form attached to the shale so it can be seen from several views. There is a smaller stem fragment associated with it, lying close to the main stem. The last image shows the broken off portion of the main stem. One of the closeups seems to suggest this had a sheath. Also, there is a very thin fossil fragment protruding from the edge of the shale close to the stem that has some texture. There are no closely associated leaves. Not sure there is any way to identify what this might be but interested in ideas, insights, observations.