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Found 62 results

  1. Is this a real T-rex tooth? The seller is marketing it as such but I can't stop a hunch that it may not be true. and / or it's a carcharodontosaurus tooth or something but they're usually thinner I thought. There is very little description and not a lot of accompanying information either. What do you experts think?
  2. Another Wyoming dig

    Last years dig season. Fossil was found lying on the ground, no digging. I was saying to myself is that what I think it is, not used to seeing or finding toe bones this large. Measures 17 inches in length. It was in three pieces which fit back together quite nicely. This was in the Lance formation and is complete.
  3. Trex skull section?

    Hello I was offer this has a trex skull section would it be form one? And was told its would be at the rear of the skull. Form hell creek formation
  4. T. rex tooth?

    Hey guys, Is this a T.Rex tooth? It looks like it. It’s only the tip though. Frome Lance Creek, Wyoming, USA Thanks for the imput and regards.
  5. With the current pandemic I decided now was as good of a time as any to get some matrix from the Aguja Formation with the help of PaleoTex! This turned out to be a great decision as I was extremely lucky, finding about basically everything I wanted to, and more in only 5 pounds of matrix! I'll be sure to post pictures but I got numerous amia and gar teeth, along with atleast 36 gar scales. Tons of Crocodile teeth including a large Deinosuchus tooth. Several shark teeth and a partial hybodus spine, also several brackish water pycnodontid teeth and tooth pallets. 4 fish or salamander jaws with teeth. Regarding dinosaur teeth I got 17 Hadrosaur teeth, including 2 partially rooted. A partial Ankylosaurus tooth. 4 Therapod teeth including a perfect Saurornitholestes tooth and a Premax. My favorite find however was the Paronychodon tooth I found! I'll be posting that picture first! Highly recommend this matrix, but I was also told that most people don't find all this stuff, so keep that in mind aswell. Stay safe! Happy hunting! (ID's for these specimens done by lab manager)
  6. Quick tour of my trip to The Ultimate Predator: T.rex exhibit at the American Museum of Natural Hisptory, NYC back in September. Some pics are not of the best quality and I apologize - the room was very dark. Speaking of which, in that dark room when you come face to face with Tyrannosaurus rex at the end of the exhibit, you are left imagining how frightening it would be to encounter such an animal in the evening . Most representations of Tyrannosaurus rex I come across don’t phase me because they either appear too outdated, or unrealistic. This is one is different because it’s not Hollywood. Whether the representation is accurate or not, it’s realistic and quite the brute. Would love to know everyone’s thoughts on this giant rex display. Positives: If you love Tyrannosaurus rex / tyrannosaurs then this is for you: all updated information and facts regarding the animal and its lineage. Dinosaur models are all very cool, realistic, and finally with feathers. Some very rare, incredible specimens on display, but few. Organized and easy to follow as you walk through the timeline. Negatives: Much more replicas than actual specimens.
  7. Dinosaur Saturday

    Hadrosaur carcasses must have been great hiding places for fishes during the Cretaceous. A beautifully preserved primitive sturgeon, in the belly cavity of a Brachylophosaurus skeleton. Thanks Jack Horner Here’s the holotype skull of Gorgosaurus libratus. This specimen was collected by Charles Sternberg from Dino Prov Park, Alberta & described by Lawrence Lambe, Canada’s first vertebrate palaeontolgist. Thanks Dave Evans Thigh bone and shin bone of a subadult Triceratops. The thigh is much longer than the shin making for a relatively short stride, suggesting Triceratops was very slow. T. rex was definitely faster than a trike & probably didn’t need to run to catch one. Compliments of Dave Evans. Wonderful skull of the very early dinosaur Eoraptor from the PVSJ collection in San Juan. It’s from the early Late Triassic Ischigualasto Formation. NHM Dinolab The theropod Coelophysis baur the State Fossil of New Mexico. This mass death assemblage depicts multiple individuals who died at the same time. Thanks Guy Leahy. Here’s a nice big T. rex tooth from Saskatchewan. Not the prettiest but from a cool location. D. Evans Acrocanthosaurus mount completed by the Black Hills Institute. Heading to the Netherlands Something you dont see often jaws of Iguanacolossus fortis. Its a genus of iguanodontian ornithopod dinosaur that lived in North America during the Early Cretaceous period from Utah . Jim Kirkland Dinossur material from Austria wow.... you are looking at the nodosaur Struthiosaurus austriacus, from the Campanian of eastern Austria. Represented by multiple individuals of different growth stages, here is the braincase and two spikes. Tom Raven
  8. Just opened the package up with this beauty in it. I have wanted a T-rex tooth for a long long while but I have never been in a position where I was willing to spend the money for the size I would get. Anyway, after watching them go up in price for the last decade plus, I finally bought one. Sold a nice old winchester rifle to pay for it, but I am pleased as punch with it. It is a hair over 3 inches in length. Found in Hell Creek formation in Powder river county, Montana. Tooth was originally in 4 pieces and has been glued back together. It's got some wear and missing enamel, but personally I think it makes it better. The serrations are amazing.
  9. Not sure if this is the correct place for this, but looking to see if I could get some verification (Is it real? Good quality?) etc as I’m fairly new to collecting.
  10. Hi guys, sorry for posting an ID question here but I don't post very often so not sure where the best place to use on the forum is. I am in the process of buying what I 'think' is a tyrannosaurus rex tooth although the seller has told me it might be either a young t-rex or a large nanotyrannus (I know that there is a lot of division in the scientific community as to whether nanotyrannus is even a real species and not just a juvenile t-rex). Please could you take a look at some of the photos and let me know your thoughts? The tooth was found in Hell Creek and measures 5.2cm (2 1/16 inches). I have heard T-rex teeth typically have no more than 2 serrations per mm also so there is a photo next to a ruler if this will help. Thank you guys so much for your help and apologies if this is posted in totally the wrong place.
  11. Tyrannosaurus rex 2.

    Hi! Again with Dino drawings! Here is the latest one, the Tyrannosaurus rex head.I've done this one for my friend from China, but i wanted to share it here as i always do that.It's complete with details. Hope you will enjoy Pozdrav!
  12. T. rex?

    I found another tooth labeled Trex/nannotyrannus. This one is also from the Hell Creek formation, and it looks like a T. rex tooth to me, but I think it could also be from a nanno. There were only a couple pictures so hopefully someone with more experience than me can help. Thanks!
  13. So i recently spent around 6k on rex material and i need more. Anyone know any good sites?
  14. Updated T.rex

    Cool article from Business Insider on the most accurate T.rex so far to date. This new exhibit is featured at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC also featuring the Tyrannosaur lineage. Really dig the new look! https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/what-paleontologists-got-wrong-about-tyrannosaurus-rex-2019-3
  15. Hell Creek Theropod Bone

    Hi All, I'm looking for some help to try and better ID this bone I collected on a Hell Creek Microsite last Summer. This was only an isolated bone and as you can see isn't complete. The length of the bone is just under 10" and the width is 4" at it's narrow point. It's a fairly flat bone with curved-edges on both sides. It's also hollow as you'll see from the photos of the end. The owner of the ranch said it had a very similar pitting on the surface to other t-rex bones they'd found on the site. This microsite produces plenty of T-rex, Nano, Hadrosaur and Triceratops material. It might of course be impossible to ID due to it's incomplete nature. It is however a pretty large chunk of bone so there are only a few bones that it could be. I was thinking it could be part of a theropod scapula due to the flat near-rectangular shape of this. Any thoughts? Tom
  16. Nanotyrannus or T-Rex?

    I got this tooth a while ago, and It was sold to me as T-Rex. I’m not really sure if it is indeed from one, or a Nanotyrannus. It’s a small tooth, found in the Hell Creek formation. Either way it’ll still be one of my favorite teeth. I’ll post some pictures.
  17. Is this a real T-rex Tibia/femur? It is 5.5 inches long
  18. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-01/fm-fst011519.php https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/animals/a25953914/new-shark-species-sue-t-rex/
  19. Hey guys, Over 4 inches and was discovered in the famous Hell Creek formation
  20. T-rex Tooth (??)

    From the album Dinosaurs

    This is a shattered and crushed tooth from the Hell Creek formation sold as a T-rex tooth. It's difficult to know for sure because of the deformation. It's also possibly a raptor or the "nanotyrannus."
  21. T Rex tooth, my dream

    Hello! Dinosaurs are my passion since I was a child. Right now I have time and money to devote more to my passion. I would like if you could recommend some good paleontologist or seller to buy some not very large tooth, of good quality and at a reasonable price of T Rex (my favorite dinosaur). I'm from Spain, I hope that is not a problem for the shipping issue. Thank you.
  22. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  23. I need help to identify these fossils

    Okay, so I have a couple of fossils in my collection, in which I'd like some more opinions on. First, I bought this un-identified dinosaur chevron bone. It is from the Kem Kem beds, Morocco.
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