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Found 467 results

  1. Happy with my shark spine

    Hi everyone , Just thought I’d like to share this find I made recently. It’s a nice. Hybodont cf. hybodus shark spine from the Rhaetic, Westbury Formation of England. It measures about 12cm. Took about 30mins to an hour extraction and about three hours repair so far. Still haven’t fully repaired it yet. It’s like a jigsaw without the cover! Biggest one I’ve ever found!
  2. Four Triassic teeth

    Found these four, if someone can take a look. All from Bull Canyob. 1 - A preondactylus tooth. 5mm. Now, I know this is from Italy, so I'm guessing name is wrong. But is it pterosaur? 2 - Fabrosaurus. 3mm 3 - Prosauropod. 4mm 4 - Eudiomorphodon - 2mm. Another species I thought was from Italy. Many thanks
  3. Nothosaurus specialist needed

    Hi! I recently bought "so called" Nothosaurus vertebra, but seller didn't have any proof of origin of the specimen. Could you confirm that this is a Nothosaurus vertebra? It was found in triassic site in Silesia, Poland. Another question. Why this bones are do small? Could it be a juvenille reptile or example of a smaller species?
  4. Fossil footprints found in Sydney suburb are from the earliest swimming tetrapods in Australia by Phil Bell, University of New England https://phys.org/news/2020-05-fossil-footprints-sydney-suburb-earliest.html Roy M. Farman et al. Australia's earliest tetrapod swimming traces from the Hawkesbury Sandstone (Middle Triassic) of the Sydney Basin, Journal of Paleontology (2020). DOI: 10.1017/jpa.2020.22 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/australias-earliest-tetrapod-swimming-traces-from-the-hawkesbury-sandstone-middle-triassic-of-the-sydney-basin/2C787D68A8F2F300B2111A0E68E5981C Yours, Paul H.
  5. I picked this up a while ago from the yard of a rockhound who is now deceased, but they could not tell me anything about it at the time anyway... all they could say was it was likely collected somewhere here on Vancouver Island, which would make it either Triassic Parson Bay/Sutton or Quatsino Formation, or Pennsylvanian/Permian Mt Mark or Buttle Lake Fm. I don't think it's likely to be from any of the younger formations. These structures look suspiciously like sponges to me, but I can't say for sure. They've obviously been silicified, which makes ID difficult. Any ideas? I noticed the feature marked with a red circle while looking thru the photos. It might be indicative of ID or maybe I'm just seeing things. I've not bothered to shrink the photos, as I want people to be able to see whatever detail there is on this thing. Hopefully they will load... I'll post one at a time if I have to.
  6. Possible trackway?

    Formation: Thaynes Fm. NOT Nugget Sandstone. Age: Early to Middle Triassic I’ve got a real brain puzzler here. I believe it is a trackway given the regular spacing and exact same prints but I don’t know what would have made it. I’ve put the north arrow to point out a third partial track. What do you think?
  7. I was wondering if there are any permian to cretaceous reptile/amphibian fossils that even an newbie like me can acquire without having to dig or pay a huge price for,I looked for permian and triassic stuff and it is really hard to find such things Are barasaurus legal to buy?
  8. Collection

    Hi all, after seeing all these nice collections from other members I also want to share the collection of my father and I with you. The collections is of various time periods and sites. We started collecting in 2009 close to home in a quarry nearby Maastricht called 't Rooth (sadly this quarry is close for visitors since 2016). From there on we started visiting other quarries and the collection started too grew massively. We frequently visited the ENCI, Winterswijk and Solnhofen. I will start off with some of the display cabinets
  9. I'm looking for some places to look for Triassic fossils in west texas. I've heard that there is some exposed along US-84 but I'm looking for a little more around there.
  10. I have my eye on them, but I thought I'd check first. First is labelled as a small carnivore Gralkator/Coelophysis from Scotland late Triassic to Early Jurassic. Matrix is 220mm x 77mm The 2nd pair is again small carnivore but from Hampton County USA, early Jurassic. Thanks
  11. Ammonites Epidaurus Greece

    Hello! I am doing some labelling and archiving so that I do not loose track of my fossils. Most of them, I have managed to narrow down to species, but for these little fellas. Some info: Triassic age Scale bar: 1cm 70% Sturia sp.or 30% Arcestes sp. Date of discovery: 2001 (My first found fossils) Location: 37°36'19"N 23°04'25"E The matrix is what locally call "Epidaurus marble". Same marble was used on the upper part of the Ancient theatre nearby, that's why it is full of cephalopods. I have read THIS and THIS post, plus a publication mentioned on the second post so I am between Sturia and Arcestes, mostly balanced towards Sturia. I compared against many photos, but I believe this made up my mind: Currently, this outcrop is not exposed. Used to be a small quarry either for marble or for fossil extraction. Has been covered with soil more than a decade and transformed into an olive oil plantation. Confirmed in person 12/2019. I know my chances are too thin since the samples are two small, but if someone is experienced to Hallstat phase, I would appreciate some advice. Wouldn't bother so much, but these are my firsts and hold deep sentimental value. Thanks in advance!
  12. Fish in a nodule needs ID

    Hi All, I bought a fossil fish on online a while ago. The seller identified it as "PTERONISCULUS Fish fossil Trias 250 mio Madagascar" It would be nice to confirm and also get additional information on possible locality, ideally reference to a scientific publication. I'm really curious about in situ conditions where the fossil was found. Could it be desert, or a mine. It seems like the fish nodules are not that rare if you look on-line but it's hard to find anything about the place of origin. Clearly, recognizing a fish species in this condition is a rare skill. So, many thanks in advance to those who will weigh in and share an opinion and information. Pictures are attached.
  13. Triassic Cephalopods fro Epidaurs

    Hi Guys, I'm taking advantage of this period of staying at home to recheck and better identify the fossils from my collection. Someone can tell me the genus and species of these triassic fossils of Epidaurus. Thanks in advance and please stay home if you can !!
  14. Encrinus liliiformis (Lamarck 1801)

    From the album Echinodermata

    Complete length 20cm. Crown: 10cm. From the German Middle Triassic Muschelkalk at Alverdissen, North Rhine Westfalia. This was part of my reward for translating a colleague's website into English for him.
  15. Footprint maybe?

    Found this not far from the other footprints. This is sandstone. I can’t really tell for sure.
  16. Interesting coprolite

    Hi guys, I normally collect only bones but in the layers where I collect them, coprolites are also often abundant. But mostly they are not very well preserved so I don't take them with me. This one is the best one I found so far and I wonder if it might be possible to find out which animal "produced" it It comes from the so called "Grenzbonebed", which is a triassic layer between Muschelkalk and Keuper. Its approximately 4 cm long. It would be great if someone can help here. Maybe @GeschWhat? My personal guess would be that it comes from a fish (maybe shark)... Thanks and stay healthy!
  17. Triops longicaudatus?? ID request

    Good morning folks. I have a plate containing two of what I 'believe" to be Triops longicaudatus specimens. I purchased it from China years ago and it was listed as "tadpoles from China". My research leads me to the Triops species, am I correct? If not, please point me in the right direction. The largest specimen measures 9cm x 4.2cm. Help......
  18. a pistosauroid

    A NEW SPECIMEN OF THE TRIASSIC PISTOSAUROID YUNGUISAURUS, WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF PLESIOSAURIA (REPTILIA, SAUROPTERYGIA) by TAMAKI SATO, LI-JUN ZHAO, XIAO-CHUN WU and CHUN LI [Palaeontology, Vol. 57, Part 1, 2014, pp. 55–76] satochunlipalassauropyunguistriasspistosaurpala.12048.pdf " Revised diagnosis. Differing from known pistosauroids in the combination of the following characters: single interpterygoid vacuity with a narrow anterior extension, anterior extension of parasphenoid, at least six premaxillary teeth,elongate snout with slender teeth, pineal foramen reachingfrontal/parietal suture, nasal present, longitudinal ridge on temporal bar, sharp parietal crest, lack of squamosal bulbat posterior end of skull table, long mandibular symphysis,prominent coronoid process, constriction of snout and mandible (in adult individuals), about 50 cervical vertebrae with short neural arch and accessory articulation (zygosphene/zygantrum), rod-shaped chevrons not united medially, sickle-shaped clavicle, small scapula withoutventral plate, dorsal process of scapula slightly widen,absence of interglenoidal thickening of coracoids, semicircular pubis, long shaft of ilium, slender humerus and epipodials, hourglass-shaped ulna, at least 11 carpals and 8 tarsals (in adult individuals), hyperphalangy in manus"
  19. I recently purchased a small lot of Bull Canyon Formation, New Mexico teeth, most of which were Phytosaurid. Then i noticed this tooth and how eerily similar it is too Pterosaur teeth from Morocco. From what i've read, there have been documented Eudimorphodon fossils collected from the Chinle Group, however i cannot find pictures for comparison. The closest teeth i can find from New Mexico are Preondactylus and Peteinosaurus teeth that have been put up for sale on multiple websites, though the information provided with them is unhelpful. I've included a photo of the "front", "back" and a side profile of the tooth. If clearer photos are needed to assist with identification, i can get some taken and uploaded.
  20. Triassic Shale Skull

    Red shale by flat run creek. Is it a skull? If so any help identifying appreciated.
  21. The old Granton Quarry site, located in North Bergen, New Jersey was a working quarry that has produced fauna from the Upper Triassic Lockatong Formation part of the Newark Super Group. Underneath a basalt cap, in beds that are tilted, are shales and sandstones deposited in an ancient tropical lake bed. Biodiversity is far from rich. The most common vertebrate fossil found is Diplurus newarki, a small coelacanth, usually 2-4 inches in length. Other fossils include Estheria ovate, a clam-shaped shrimp-like crustacean. Rare remains of reptiles have also been found at the site. Development has claimed most of the quarry site, but an outcrop remains in an area that is unfortunately a repository for trash and graffiti and infested with poison ivy. Because of the poison ivy winter is the only time the site can be visited. I've been visiting the old Granton Quarry site once or twice a year since 2013. I've brought a number of TFF members to Granton, but Tim (fossildude19) has a been my companion for almost all of those trips since the first one. Last Sunday, the weather was mild and Tim and I accompanied by TFF members Dave (Shamalama) and Paul1719 visited once again. The site, always a difficult one to work, is becoming more challenging. The cliff is, I estimate 40-50 feet tall, but it is a less than one inch wide bed of black shale (called G-7) that is very fossiliferous. That bed is generally flush with or indented into the wall. All of the easily accessible G-7 has been already dug out. Where it is exposed and weathered it tends to splinter into fine shards obliterating any fossils that might have been present. Deeper in the wall it incredibly hard. Pulling out a decent size chunk to split is difficult to say the least. Finding a few already started cracks I was able penetrate deeper using my sledge and long chisel. Then I used my crowbar to wedge them out. In a full day of digging I was able to wedge out two chunks of G-7 , each several inches across. From these I got the majority of specimens I found. One piece appears to have two complete or nearly complete Diplurus which I sent to Ptychodus 04 in Texas to prep. In addition to fossils, Tim found a live red-backed salamander, our first amphibian siting of the spring. Here's Tim:
  22. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  23. Coprolite verification

    Good morning folks. I purchased this box of coprolites many years ago under the description "Triassic carnivore fossil dinosaur coprolite, New Mexico". Did I do good or did I get taken?
  24. I'm not to sure if is the right part of the forum to be asking this but is anyone or would anyone know any experts/specialists that have a focus in Triassic Reptile/Amphibian Remains? Can even be a recomendation of an email address for a specific paleontologist I would be able to contact in regard to discussing a specimen directly and privately.
  25. I will trade these fossils for one well preserved European goniatite or European triassic ammonite (specimen with 5 to 8 cm preferentially) because that kind of specimen is lack in my teaching collection. Note the Anorthopygus orbicularis is not a common species and, apart the incomplete test, has an exceptional detailed preservation, rarely seen. Best regards, Ricardo Traded
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