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Found 293 results

  1. a seedy coat

    Austrian between 4 and 5 Mb A treat,if you ask me.
  2. Acrodus tooth

    From the album Triassic fossils

    This is a 1.2 cm long Acrodus tooth with a nice structure ! Those are very common in some layers in the "Bonebed" in Zwingelhausen but bigger ones are quite rare.
  3. Tanystropheus tooth

    From the album Triassic fossils

    This is my first Tanystropheus tooth from the "Bonebed" of Zwingelhausen. Its about 1.5 cm long. Another picture:
  4. Nothosaurus tooth

    From the album Triassic fossils

    This is my biggest Nothosaurus tooth until now with a length of 2.5 cm ! Its from a quarry near Zwingelhausen from the "Bonebed" (Triassic). Some more pictures:
  5. Nothosaurus vertebra

    From the album Triassic fossils

    A 3 cm long Nothosaurus vertebra from the "Bonebed" in a quarry near Zwingelhausen (Triassic).
  6. Birgeria mougeoti

    From the album Triassic fossils

    A fish tooth (Birgeria mougeoti) from the "Bonebed" in a quarry near Zwingelhausen (Triassic). Its about 1 cm long.and relatively common.
  7. In these two threads I mainly present finished prep results of the fossils I found in a quarry near Zwingelhausen: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83796-maybe-a-new-emphasis/ http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/84219-some-more-bones-and-teeth/ But one of the reason why I currently hunt more in Zwingelhausen is that I can prep the fossils from Zwingelhausen with my new engraving pen (HW-10). Its somehow easier than prepping for example bones from Holzmaden, because there is a better sparation layer between the stone and the fossils. All fossils come from the triassic (Bonebed). At first this 5 cm long vertebra: You can only see the cross section: After 20 minutes of preparing: And the for now finished piece: I prepped it only from one site and didnt glue both sites together until now ... The second one I want to show is a rib fragment from Zwingelhausen: It was broken in three parts and was very difficult to prep. At first I began to prep from the other side but there the separation layer. Because of that there is this hole in the stone to ome to the other side of the fossil. Here is the finished prep work: (After three hours ...) I know that I am not very good in prepping fossils but I hope that I will learn much more in the future and that I become better and better !
  8. Some more bones and teeth !

    Last Sunday I was in the quarry Zwingelhausen and I found again some Triassic stuff ! I only searched in the "Bonebed", where you can find many bones but they are often damaged and worn. In this topic I already presented the quarry and some of my finds from there: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83796-maybe-a-new-emphasis/ Here is a picture of the quarry: This time I found some nice ribs ... For example, this one: It's about 15 cm long and it was very difficult almost impossible to excavate it, because the stone is really hard and the fossil is very fragile ! I will post my finished "prep" (or better gluing) work in the next days Here is another small (5 cm long) rib fragment. It was fun to prep this one so although it's not nice or a complete piece I decided to post this one: The next one is a very nice vertebra: Unprepped: This job wasnt that hard because the separation layer between the stone and the fossil is distinctive and the fossil was already exposed mostly ! The vert is about 4 cm long: I think that most of my bones are Nothosaurus bones ... And the last one for today is this Acrodus tooth: They are very common but this one is big with a length of 1.2 cm and the preservation is very good in my eyes ! I will continue this topic in the next days ... Thanks for watching ! Hope you enjoyed
  9. Malagasy Fish Fossils

    All I know is that they may be from Madagascar - any help identifying the type of fish and age would be great. Triassic perhaps? I'm afraid I have no more information. Thank you!
  10. Dinosaurs ended - and originated - with a bang ? In the new paper, published today in Nature Communications, evidence is provided to match the two events – the mass extinction, called the Carnian Pluvial Episode, and the initial diversification of dinosaurs Press release http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2018/april/dinosaurs-ended-and-originated-with-a-bang-.html Paper https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03996-1
  11. I don't know much about plants. What could this be? Part of a cycad? An infructescence? The fossil comes from the Upper Triassic / Lower Jurassic of Unternschreez near Bayreuth, Germany. Can someone help me with that? Thank you Thomas
  12. Icarealcyon malagasium Beltan, 1984

    From the album Vertebrates

    Icarealcyon malagasium Beltan, 1984 Early Triassic Dienerian Sakamena Formation Ambilobe Madagascar
  13. From the album Vertebrates

    Piveteauia madagascariensis Lehman 1952 Early Triassic Dienerian Sakamena Formation Ambilobe Madagascar J.-P. Lehman. 1952. Etude complémentaire des poissons de l'Eotrias de Madagascar. Kungliga Svenska Vetenskapsakademiens Handlingar 2:1-201
  14. Lit.: F. Wu, Y. Sun, G. Xu, W. Hao, D. Jiang and Z. Sun. 2011. New Saurichthyid Actinopterygian Fishes from the Anisian (Middle Triassic) of Southwestern China. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 56(3):581-614
  15. Icarealcyon malagasium Beltan, 1984

    From the album Vertebrates

    Icarealcyon malagasium Beltan, 1984 Early Triassic Dienerian Sakamena Formation Ambilobe Madagascar Due to its enormous pectoral fins, Icarealcyon malagasium was described by Beltan as a "poisson volant" - a "flying fish" - in the family Semonotidae (not related to what is now known as "flying fish" - these are Exocoetidae in the order Beloniformes). You would expect flying fish to be fast swimmers - the rather thickset appearance of Icarealcyon more likely hints to slow swimmers with relatively high maneuverability (comparable to Albertonia from British Columbia).
  16. Rhaetian Bone ID

    Hi Help needed please, Does anyone recognise what this bone is? It's from the late Triassic, rhaetian of the UK. I don't think it's broken and I suspect it's a skull bone but that's the extent of my guesses. It's about 3 inches long and pretty thin. The outcrop is a bone bed which is mainly marine ie ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs and fish but it does contain the remains of land animals. Bones are isolated and it's extremely rare to find anything associated. thanks Nick
  17. Started my Season

    Yesterday I started my fossil season 2018. It was the first real warm spring weekend this year. What a good feeling to get out again on such a beautyful day. Fortune was along with me and so I found several Triassic ammonoids. The small ones in the block are of upper Carnian(Tuvalian) age. The black Arcestes are of Norian age. Much snow is still on the higher mountains so it will last longer to start collecting at higher locations this year. regards Andreas
  18. Pachystropheus rhaeticus

    Hi Here's a small femur from the Triassic reptile Pachstropheus rhaeticus. The femur is about 2 inches long and sits amongst some Triassic debris including fish teeth. Nick
  19. Nothosaurus youngi LI & RIEPPEL, 2004

    From the album Vertebrates

    Nothosaurus youngi LI & RIEPPEL, 2004 Middle Triassic Fuyan Yunnan China
  20. Triassic Therapod Bone

    I found this piece of bone about a month ago and didn't really know what I was dealing with until I started prepping it out. I know that it is theropod based on the hollow structure, this should be at least somewhat visible in the photo of the broken edge. It came from the Redonda Formation in Eastern New Mexico where theropod remains have been found, but nothing identifiable to species. If anyone here can identify the species that would be fantastic, but I really just want to know what bone it is. My guess is the end of the pubis or ilium, but I was hoping for some other opinions.
  21. Triassic Period Emergence of Dinosaurs

    Decade of fossil collecting in Africa gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaurs Michelle Ma, University Of Washington News, http://www.washington.edu/news/2018/03/28/decade-of-fossil-collecting-in-africa-gives-new-perspective-on-triassic-period-emergence-of-dinosaurs/ https://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2018/03/decade-fossil-collecting-africa-gives-new-perspective-triassic-period Memoir 17: Vertebrate and Climatic Evolution in the Triassic Rift Basins of Tanzania and Zambia, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ujvp20/current Yours, Paul H.
  22. The Mesozoic is an area that is sorely lacking in my collection. I don't know why, but I just never got around to collecting in it. I never fell in love with dinosaurs or mososaurs like a lot of other people. That was until fairly recently, when I finally took it upon myself to diversify my collection and get to know better my area's (and in some ways own backyard!) geology and paleontology. I set out to discover more about Maryland's Mesozoic Park. I guess it would be best to start off from the beginning. I started the journey not knowing what I'd find, but knowing what it was I hoped to find. I wanted a piece of the hallmark of the Mesozoic, the age of reptiles - my very own Old Line State dinosaur! There was only one problem - I didn't know where to find one. I knew generally what formations to look in, but not where, nor even what to look for. So I took up the ole' Google machine and my own literature at home and started uncovering more about where to start looking. That's what lead me to the first site. A TREK INTO THE TRIASSIC It would be disingenuous to say that I did this all by myself, and I would like to thank @WhodamanHD for helping me out tremendously. Without him I likely never would have gotten this together. For those who don't know, I'll take the liberty to describe the geology of the Free State. In Maryland, the only Triassic aged rocks exposed are those of the Newark Group, here divided by the Maryland Geological Survey into two formations - the New Oxford and the Gettysburg Shale. Both units are exposed in the Culpeper Basin (centered around the town of Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland) and the Gettysburg Basin (centered around, in Maryland, the town of Emmitsburg, Frederick County, Maryland). After several months of searching I was never able to find a good exposure near the famous former quarries around the Seneca region in Montgomery County, which is what lead me to the area near Frederick. Here the Triassic rocks are more readily exposed, with reports of numerous fossil discoveries of dinosaur footprints, plants, fish, and others in the area near Mt. St. Mary's University and Rocky Ridge. The Gettysburg Shale in this region is the most fossiliferous, and that is the one I ended up collecting in. Thanks again to @WhodamanHD for giving me info about the site! I spent a good hour or so at the Gettysburg Shale site, my mind full of images of that amazing Grallator sp. print I'd know I'd find. Unfortunately, as the shadows started growing and the day grew colder, I was forced to give up my quest without any dinosaur specimens from this unit. Still, it was nice to finally be able to collect in it and get to experience these amazing rocks up close and personal. The vast majority of the finds from this site were simple trace fossils of I assume to be annelid worms, these being most common in the glossy looking shale.
  23. https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/laelaps/paleo-profile-the-fish-from-china/
  24. This species is also known under the name T. hsui. The discussion about whether this is T. hsui or T. caudex seems to be still going on. Lit,; Xiaofeng, W., Hagdorn, H. & Chuanshang, W. 2006 09 12: Pseudoplanktonic lifestyle of the Triassic crinoid Traumatocrinus from Southwest China. Lethaia , Vol. 39, pp. 187193. Oslo. ISSN 0024-1164 Wang et al,. Restudy of the crinoids Traumatocrinus of the Guanling biota Guizhou. Geological Bulletin of China Vol. 22 No. 4, 2003
  25. A number of collectors are very interested in Triassic Dinosaur tooth material, however, lots of misinformation exists, partially because little is known and dealers want to sell product. My knowledge is very limited so I tried to put together an assemblage of current information that has been published so that we can all become better versed on this topic. I'm not saying its complete but its the best I can do with my limited knowledge. Most technical papers on this subject are outdated, difficult to read for a novice and not complete enough. Fortunately a recent, legible paper was published in 2015 by Heckert & Lucas that has helped me. I've tried to extract the pertinent information, associated with teeth, since that what most collectors are interested in. First let me get on my sandbox and say that we should NOT assume that what is being sold is accurately described regardless who is selling it or how much you like a dealer. Very little is known and even less is described. If a seller insists what he has identified is accurate, have him show you the technical documents that supports his diagnosis. There are a number of theropods and archosaurs in these assemblages that have serrated teeth so identification is difficult. Triassic dealers similar to those in the Kem Kem which label everthing Spinosaurus like to label everything Coelophysis. Just be cautious..its your money. Almost all the teeth you see sold come from New Mexico so I will focus in that region. A Map of New Mexico with the Triassic outcrops shown below as well as the associated Counties. The numbers correlate to the stratigraphic formations shown below in Figure 4. Figure 4 The Zuni Mountains in West-Central NM are from the lower Chinle Group (Bluewater Creek Fm) and contain Tetrapod fossils amphibians and phytosaurs and aetosaurs. Dinosaurs are possible but nothing is diagnostic. Faunal List of the lower Chinle Group Zuni Mountains Northern/West Central New Mexico has yielded some of the most interesting Vertebrate Fossils most associated with Coelophysis at Ghost Ranch. Included in this group are the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation of the western counties. Chindesaurus bryansmalli, Tawa hallae and Daemonosaurus chauliodus are considered valid a dinosaurs in the Petrified Forest Fm. Coelophysis bauri is valid from the Rock Point Formation. Faunal List of the Petrified Forest and Rock Point Formation - Key on this list is Coelophysis bauri in the Rock Point Fm Northeasten New Mexico (Bull Canyon and Redonda Formations). Heckerts 2015 paper comments that dinosaur fossils remains are rare in the Bull Canyon Formation. The coelophysoid Gojirasaurus quayi has been described but its taxonomic placement is uncertain. Herrerasauridae tooth fragments have been found but nothing has been assigned to a taxon. Heckerts & Lucas 2015 Paper on Triassic Vertebrate Paleontology in New Mexico https://libres.uncg.edu/ir/asu/f/Heckert_Andrew_triassic.pdf Bull Canyon Formation 2001 Paper on Vertebrate Fauna https://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/downloads/52/52_p0123_p0151.pdf Latest placement ( Hans-Dieter Sues et al 2011 ) Identifying Coelophysis bauri Teeth - There is lots of variation their teeth and I will show a few types. The Museum of Northern Arizona publication Coelophysis describes the teeth as follows: All the teeth are recurved Premaxillary teeth: rounded cross-section, smaller teeth are ribbed but smooth on larger ones. None show serrations. Maxillary Teeth: the first tooth is recurved with no serrations, second tooth has serrations only on the posterior carina. All the other maxillary teeth have serrations on both edges. Some of the teeth the serrations may be limited to the upper part of the anterior (mesial) edge. Dentary Teeth: the first seven teeth lack serrations, eight tooth serrations only on the posterior edge. Subsequent teeth have serrations on both edges. The first four teeth are elliptical (rounded) in cross-section being compressed after that. Anterior teeth may contain ridges. Serrations are very fine 8 to 9 per millimeter on the posterior (distal) edge. (other publications say 7/mm) Distal Carina Denticles Premaxillary, Maxillary and Dentary teeth shown - Dentary tooth Maxillary Tooth Anterior Denticles Posterior Maxillary Tooth Paper on Coelophsis Teeth by Currie and Buckley Coelophisis.pdf Additional images of the teeth with no supporting info Good overall paper on C. bauri but does nothing to increase our knowledge on how to describe its teeth https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292525024_The_paleobiology_of_Coelophysis_bauri_Cope_from_the_Upper_Triassic_Apachean_Whitaker_quarry_New_Mexico_with_detailed_analysis_of_a_single_quarry_block Other Theropods Gojirasaurus quayi : one tooth was described with the holotype however it was found isolated and cannot be positively assigned to this species. I cannot find an image of it. Chindesaurus bryansmalli : not aware of any skeletal material Daemonosaurus chauliodus The paper does not get into detail on the teeth. See below http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/278/1723/3459.full.pdf Tawa hallae : paper is paywalled 1 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/326/5959/1530
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